Best 66 of Neurology quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 17 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Memory is the coherence of life, that possesses all your emotions, and ambitions. Without it, your joyous as well as agonizing experiences of life won’t have any significance to you whatsoever.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

All our sentiments - religious, romantic or any other - are born in the neurons.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Genes come together to construct a magnificent life-form, while neurons come together to form our Illusion of Consciousness.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Harris Coulter

The association between the post-encephalitic syndrome and demyelination or incomplete myelination of the brain seems quite secure. And the fact that encephalitis -including that caused by vaccination- can cause demyelination has been known since the 1920's!

By Anonym 16 Sep

Cordelia Fine

In the statistical gargon used in psychology, p refers to the probability that the difference you see between two groups (of introverts and extroverts, say, or males and females) could have occurred by chance. As a general rule, psychologists report a difference between two groups as 'significant' if the probability that it could have occurred by chance is 1 in 20, or less. The possibility of getting significant results by chance is a problem in any area of research, but it's particularly acute for sex differences research. Supppose, for example, you're a neuroscientist interested in what parts of the brain are involved in mind reading. You get fifteen participants into a scanner and ask them to guess the emotion of people in photographs. Since you have both males and females in your group, you rin a quick check to ensure that the two groups' brains respond in the same way. They do. What do you do next? Most likely, you publish your results without mentioning gender at all in your report (except to note the number of male and female participants). What you don't do is publish your findings with the title "No Sex Differences in Neural Circuitry Involved in Understanding Others' Minds." This is perfectly reasonable. After all, you weren't looking for gender difference and there were only small numbers of each sex in your study. But remember that even if males and females, overall, respond the same way on a task, five percent of studies investigating this question will throw up a "significant" difference between the sexes by chance. As Hines has explained, sex is "easily assessed, routinely evaluated, and not always reported. Because it is more interesting to find a difference than to find no difference, the 19 failures to observe a difference between men and women go unreported, whereas the 1 in 20 finding of a difference is likely to be published." This contributes to the so-called file-drawer phenomenon, whereby studies that do find sex differences get published, but those that don't languish unpublished and unseen in a researcher's file drawer.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Aldous Huxley

The brain is provided with a number of enzyme systems which serve to co-ordinate its workings. Some of these enzymes regulate the supply of glucose to the brain cells. Mescalin inhibits the production of these enzymes and thus lowers the amount of glucose available to an organ that is in constant need of sugar. When mescalin reduces the brain’s normal ration of sugar what happens? Too few cases have been observed, and therefore a comprehensive answer cannot yet be given. But what happens to the majority of the few who have taken mescalin under supervision can be summarized as follows…

By Anonym 16 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

It's been long since thinking humanity has learnt that love is a majestic creation of the brain, yet that knowledge hasn't made love be deemed any less glorious. Then why should it threaten the religious believer to learn that divinity as well is a natural creation of the brain?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alice Weaver Flaherty

Neurology and psychiatry should be treating the same organ.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Consciousness is simply the brain’s neural response to its surrounding environmental stimuli. Hence when the neural circuits malfunction, Consciousness tends to malfunction as well.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Each day I wake up with a naive perspective of life and universe, and walk towards understanding a little more about the true nature of human perception with all its vivacious nuances and behavioral expressions.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Self is an illusory by-product of the brain's response to the environment, with the purpose of survival of life. However, within the subjective realm of the human mind, due to higher brain capacities, the self is capable of creating its own illusory purpose, in an attempt to provide meaning in life.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Naturalism is the least subjective reality in this human world.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

We are but a bunch of neurons.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Jerry A. Coyne

Which do you think is more valuable to humanity? a. Finding ways to tell humans that they have free will despite the incontrovertible fact that their actions are completely dictated by the laws of physics as instantiated in our bodies, brains and environments? That is, engaging in the honored philosophical practice of showing that our notion of "free will" can be compatible with determinism? or b. Telling people, based on our scientific knowledge of physics, neurology, and behavior, that our actions are predetermined rather than dictated by some ghost in our brains, and then sussing out the consequences of that conclusion and applying them to society? Of course my answer is b).

By Anonym 18 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

The Kingdom of God is an earthly experience which manifests in an unearthly manner.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Mother Nature created God as a neurological anti-depressant sentiment, but Man tore that God apart into pieces and made citadels of differentiation out of them.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Oliver Sacks

With neurology, if you go far enough with it, and you keep going, you end up getting weird. If you go a little further, you end up in the spirit.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Born of neurons, soul is the very essence of being - soul is the very foundation of your existence - your psychological existence, from which all your physical prowess and progress manifest.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Memory is the binding foam of our mental life.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Clifford Geertz

I think what's known about neurology is still scattered and uncertain

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander R. Luria

A man does not consist of memory alone. He has feeling, will, sensibility, and moral being.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

The human construct of the so-called reality is prone to self−deception. One way or another, we all are being deceived by our own mind. We always see what we want to see.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Neuron is to Consciousness, what D.N.A. is to Life. Thus, Biology of Mind is to the twenty-first century, what Biology of Life was to the twentieth century.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Will Boast

The human brain is the universe's most implausible science experiment.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Biologically speaking, you are the child of Mother Nature, and neurologically speaking, you are the heirs of immortal bliss.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

If I ask you, are you conscious right now? You'd go right ahead and tell me - yes. That's because your conscious mind is constructing an awareness in you about everything around you. And underneath that operation of your conscious mind, there are billions of neurons working in proper harmony.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Alexandra Robbins

The human brain takes in information from other people and incorporates it with the information coming from its own senses, neuroscientist Gregory Berns has written. Many times, the group's opinion trumps the individual's before he even becomes aware of it.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Pathology can indeed evoke experiences of Absolute Godliness, but not all God experiences are caused by pathology. They can also occur due to disturbance in the geomagnetic field of our planet, consumption of psychedelics, excruciatingly extreme level of stress during a near- death situation, or ultimately through a natural and healthy procedure of meditation or/and prayer.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

We study humans to give them a healthier and happier life.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Presiding over the entire attack there will be, in du Bois Reymond's words, "a general feeling of disorder," which may be experienced in either physical or emotional terms, and tax or elude the patient's powers of description.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Adrian Raine

Genetics, accidents of birth or events in early childhood have left criminals' brains and bodies with measurable flaws predisposing them to committing assault, murder and other antisocial acts. .... Many offenders also have impairments in their autonomic nervous system, the system responsible for the edgy, nervous feeling that can come with emotional arousal. This leads to a fearless, risk-taking personality, perhaps to compensate for chronic under-arousal. Many convicted criminals, like the Unabomber, have slow heartbeats. It also gives them lower heart rates, which explains why heart rate is such a good predictor of criminal tendencies. The Unabomber, Ted Kaczynski, for example, had a resting heart rate of just 54 beats per minute, which put him in the bottom 3 per cent of the population.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Authenticity and respect go to those who stick to their own specific field of work. For example, I am a Biologist and my work is the understanding of human nature - that's where I place all my attention. I know nothing revelatory about modern physics - I know nothing revelatory about mathematics - I know nothing revelatory about architecture - I know nothing revelatory about any field of understanding except for the ones directly related to biology. It doesn't mean that I cannot learn about other fields - I can, but every human has his or her own distinct knack, and mine is understanding humans - understanding how and why they think, what they think - how and why they feel, what they feel - how and why they behave, the way they behave - how and why they perceive, what they perceive.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Steven Pinker

...the [mental] organization of grammar [is] a case where complexity in the mind is not caused by learning; learning is caused by complexity in the mind.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Through the sacred verses filled with violence and self-righteousness, the minds of the angry individuals find a way to get rid of all their misery. At that unstable state of consciousness, they are drawn to the description of the Holy War. They visualize a glimmer of hope. They feel absolutely immersed in it. Finally when they emerge as holy warriors, they are no longer humans, from the emotional perspective. They emerge as wild beasts, neurologically almost unable to feel human emotions, like empathy, love, kindness and compassion. Consequently the whole world faces the wrath of the most primitive of all human elements in the name of God’s judgment.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Even though it is common knowledge in our field of Neuroscience, I take immense pleasure every time I realize that our perception of the whole universe emerges from the activity of the little specks of jelly inside our skull.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

​God is hardwired within the neural circuitry.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Bessel Van Der Kolk

The social environment interacts with brain chemistry. Manipulating a monkey into a lower position in the dominance hierarchy made his serotonin drop, while chemically enhancing serotonin elevated the rank of former subordinates.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

​Everything that makes you, you, is a biologically existential expression of your entire brain.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Every part of the brain plays a crucial role in the construction of something magnificent which we call ”mind”. But if we observe closely, the mind doesn’t exactly exist as one distinct process or entity or system. It’s rather an illusion. We can understand this better if we see the mind as a nation. Think of the nation you live in. Is there really any such thing as a ”nation”! A nation is simply the collection of activities of a group of people inside an imaginary border. Likewise, mind is the collection of activities of a group of neurons inside the skull. And just like in a nation, when a few neurons malfunction, others can slowly learn to take their place. But when an entire group of neurons in a specific brain region malfunctions, it can impede in the proper functioning of the mind, just like when a huge number of people in an entire state or district stop working, it can affect the functioning of the entire nation.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

​The universe perceives itself through us, or to be more specific, through our neurons.

By Anonym 16 Sep

George Saunders

I guess I was sad that love was not real? Or not all that real, anyway? I guess I was sad that love could feel so real and the next minute be gone, and all because of something Abnesti was doing.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

The lessons of relationship that our primordial ancestors learned are deeply encoded in the genetics of our neurobiological circuits of love. They are present from the moment we are born and activated at puberty by the cocktail of neurochemicals. It’s an elegant synchronized system. At first our brain weighs a potential partner, and if the person fits our ancestral wish list, we get a spike in the release of sex chemicals that makes us dizzy with a rush of unavoidable infatuation. It’s the first step down the primeval path of pair-bonding.

By Anonym 16 Sep

V. S. Ramachandran

It is difficult to overstate the importance of understanding mirror neurons and their function. They may well be central to social learning, imitation, and the cultural transmission of skills and attitudes—perhaps even of the pressed-together sound clusters we call words. By hyperdeveloping the mirror-neuron system, evolution in effect turned culture into the new genome. Armed with culture, humans could adapt to hostile new environments and figure out how to exploit formerly inaccessible or poisonous food sources in just one or two generations—instead of the hundreds or thousands of generations such adaptations would have taken to accomplish through genetic evolution. Thus culture became a significant new source of evolutionary pressure, which helped select brains that had even better mirror-neuron systems and the imitative learning associated with them. The result was one of the many self-amplifying snowball effects that culminated in Homo sapiens, the ape that looked into its own mind and saw the whole cosmos reflected inside.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

The marvelous interplay of various brain circuits creates our instinctual reality of the daily life.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Alexandra Robbins

Nonconformists aren't just going against the grain; they're going against the brain. Either their brains aren't taking the easy way out to begin with, or in standing apart from their peers, these students are standing up to their biology.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

In this universe, all we perceive is a virtual reality created by the neurons.

By Anonym 18 Sep

David Cronenberg

Reality is neurology, and is not absolute.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Robert Jourdain

Planning. Short-term memory. Attention. At first glance, these three frontal lobe functions can seem like diverse activities that just happen to be packed into the same brain region. But on closer inspection it turns out that they are facets of the same basic phenomenon of 'restraint'. Planning restrains our brains from wandering from a chosen path of activity. Short-term memory retrains sensory cortex from moving on to different imagery. Attention constrains the kind of sensory data admitted to sensory cortex.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Brain health is not to be hailed as a habit of the rich and famous, rather it must be made a worldwide trait of human existence.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Winifred Gallagher

Recently, the search for what he calls "the splinters that make up different attention problems" has taken Castellanos in a new direction. First, he explains that your brain is far less concerned with your brilliant ideas or searing emotions than with its own internal "gyroscopic busyness," which consumes 65 percent of its total energy. Every fifty seconds, its activity fluctuates, causing what he calls a "brownout." No one knows the purpose of these neurological events, but Castellanos has a thesis: the clockwork pulses enable the brain's circuits to stay "logged on" and available to communicate with one another, even when they're not being used. "Imagine you're a cabdriver on your day off," Castellanos says. "You don't need to use your workday circuits on a Sunday, but to keep those channels open, your brain sends a ping through them every minute or so. The fluctuations are the brain's investment in maintaining its circuits online.