Best 549 of James Madison quotes - MyQuotes

Follow
James Madison
By Anonym 14 Sep

James Madison

It is a universal truth that the loss of liberty at home is to be charged to the provisions against danger, real or pretended, from abroad.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Madison

Democracies have been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their death.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Madison

Whenever a youth is ascertained to possess talents meriting an education which his parents cannot afford, he should be carried forward at the public expense.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Madison

The definition of the right of suffrage is very justly regarded as a fundamental article of republican government.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Madison

The fetters imposed on liberty at home have ever been forged out of the weapons provided for defense against real, pretended, or imaginary dangers from abroad.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Madison

The governments of Europe are afraid to trust the people with arms. If they did, the people would certainly shake off the yoke of tyranny, as America did.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Madison

The free system of government we have established is so congenial with reason, with common sense, and with a universal feeling, that it must produce approbation and a desire of imitation, as avenues may be found for truth to the knowledge of nations.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Madison

Outlets for the freed blacks are alone wanted for the erasure of the blot from our Republican character.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Madison

In the compound republic of America, the power surrendered by the people is first divided between two distinct governments, and then the portion allotted to each subdivided among distinct and separate governments. Hence a double security arises to the rights of the people. The different governments will control each other, at the same time that each will be controlled by itself.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Madison

This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land.

By Anonym 16 Sep

James Madison

... [E]xperience witnesseth that ecclesiastical establishments, instead of maintaining the purity and efficacy of Religion, have had a contrary operation. During almost fifteen centuries has the legal establishment of Christianity been on trial. What have been its fruits? More or less in all places, pride and indolence in the Clergy, ignorance and servility in the laity, in both, superstition, bigotry and persecution.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Madison

In no instance have... the churches been guardians of the liberties of the people.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Madison

The capacity of the female mind for studies of the highest order cannot be doubted, having been sufficiently illustrated by its works of genius, of erudition, and of science.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Madison

It is in vain to oppose constitutional barriers to the impulse of self-preservation. It is worse than in vain; because it plants in the Constitution itself necessary usurpations of power, every precedent of which is a germ of unnecessary and multiplied repetitions.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Madison

It is a misfortune, inseparable from human affairs, that public measures are rarely investigated with that spirit of moderation which is essential to a just estimate of their real tendency to advance or obstruct the public good; and that this spirit is more apt to be diminished than prompted, by those occasions which require an unusual exercise of it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Madison

The circulation of confidence is better than the circulation of money.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Madison

But the mild voice of reason, pleading the cause of an enlarged and permanent interest, is but too often drowned, before public bodies as well as individuals, by the clamors of an impatient avidity for immediate and immoderate gain.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Madison

[The proposed establishment] will have a . . . tendency to banish our Citizens. . . . To superadd a fresh motive to emigration by revoking the liberty which they now enjoy, would be the same species of folly which has dishonoured and depopulated flourishing kingdoms.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Madison

War contains so much folly, as well as wickedness, that much is to be hoped from the progress of reason.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Madison

The public affairs of the union are spread throughout a very extensive region, and are extremely diversified by the local affairs connected with them, and can with difficulty be learnt in any other place, than in the central councils, to which a knowledge of them will be brought by the representatives of every part of the empire. Yet some knowledge of the affairs, and even of the laws of all the states, ought to be possessed by the members from each of the states.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Madison

The proposed constitution, therefore, even when tested by the rules laid down by its antagonists, is, in strictness, neither a national nor a federal constitution; but a composition of both. In its foundation it is federal, not national; in the sources from which the ordinary powers of the government are drawn, it is partly federal, and partly national; in the operation of these powers, it is national, not federal; in the extent of them again, it is federal, not national; and finally, in the authoritative mode of introducing amendments, it is neither wholly federal, nor wholly national.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Madison

[Christianity] existed and flourishes, not only without the support of human laws, but in spite of every opposition from them.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Madison

In the first place, it is to be remembered, that the general government is not to be charged with the whole power of making and administering laws. Its jurisdiction is limited to certain enumerated objects, which concern all the members of the republic, but which are not to be attained by the separate provisions of any.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Madison

The purpose of separation of church and state is to keep forever from these shores the ceaseless strife that has soaked the soil of Europe with blood for centuries.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Madison

Liberty may be endangered by the abuse of liberty, but also by the abuse of power.

By Anonym 18 Sep

James Madison

Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind, and unfits it for every noble enterprise, every expanded prospect. [Letter to William Bradford Jr. April 1 1774]

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Madison

Experience has instructed us that no skill in the science of government has yet been able to discriminate and define, with sufficient certainty, its three great provinces the legislative, executive, and judiciary; or even the privileges and powers of the different legislative branches.

By Anonym 18 Sep

James Madison

Since the general civilization of mankind, I believe there are more instances of the abridgment of the freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments of those in power, than by violent and sudden usurpations.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Madison

Those who hold and those who are without property have ever formed distinct interests in society.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Madison

By rendering the labor of one, the property of the other, they cherish pride, luxury, and vanity on one side; on the other, vice and servility, or hatred and revolt.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Madison

They can make no law which will not have its full operation on themselves and their friends, as well as on the great mass of the society.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Madison

The means of defence against foreign danger have been always the instruments of tyranny at home. Among the Romans it was a standing maxim to excite a war, whenever a revolt was apprehended. Throughout all Europe, the armies kept up under the pretext of defending, have enslaved the people.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Madison

In all great changes of established governments, forms ought to give way to substance

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Madison

Hence it is that such democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths. Theoretic politicians, who have patronized this species of government, have erroneously supposed that by reducing mankind to a perfect equality in their political rights, they would, at the same time, be perfectly equalized and assimilated in their possessions, their opinions, and their passions.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Madison

The citizens of the United States have peculiar motives to support the energy of their constitutional charters.

By Anonym 20 Sep

James Madison

Wherever the real power in a Government lies, there is the danger of oppression. In our Governments the real power lies in the majority of the Community, and the invasion of private rights is chiefly to be apprehended, not from acts of Government contrary to the sense of its constituents, but from acts in which the Government is the mere instrument of the major number of the constituents.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Madison

The necessity of a senate is not less indicated by the propensity of all single and numerous assemblies, to yield to the impulse of sudden and violent passions, and to be seduced by factious leaders, into intemperate and pernicious resolutions.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Madison

The Constitution of the United States was created by the people of the United States composing the respective states, who alone had the right.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Madison

I am unable to conceive that the state legislatures which must feel so many motives to watch, and which possess so many means of counteracting the federal legislature, would fail either to detect or to defeat a conspiracy of the latter against the liberties of their common constituencies.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Madison

The danger of disturbing the public tranquillity by interesting too strongly the public passions, is a still more serious objection against a frequent reference of constitutional questions to the decision of the whole society.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Madison

The American people owe it to themselves, and to the cause of free Government, to prove by their establishments for the advancement and diffusion of knowledge, that their political Institutionsare as favorable to the intellectual and moral improvement of Man as they are conformable to his individual and social rights.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Madison

I flatter myself [we] have in this country extinguished forever the ambitious hope of making laws for the human mind.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Madison

Man, who preys both on the vegetable and animal species, is himself a prey to neither. He too possesses the reproductive principle far beyond the degree requisite for the bare continuance of his species. What becomes of the surplus of human life to which this principle is competent?

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Madison

Who does not see that . . . the same authority which can force a citizen to contribute three pence only of his property for the support of any one establishment, may force him to conform to any other establishment in all cases whatsoever?

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Madison

The ultimate authority resides in the people, and that if the federal government got too powerful and overstepped its authority, then the people would develop plans of resistance and resort to arms.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Madison

Good conscience is the most valuable asset of all!

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Madison

In this relation, then, the proposed government cannot be deemed a national one; since its jurisdiction extends to certain enumerated objects only, and leaves to the several states, a residuary and inviolable sovereignty over all other objects.

By Anonym 16 Sep

James Madison

During almost fifteen centuries has the legal establishment of Christianity been on trial. What have been its fruits? More or less in all places, pride and indolence in the Clergy, ignorance and servility in the laity, in both, superstition, bigotry and persecution.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Madison

The experience of the United States is a happy disproof of the error so long rooted in the unenlightened minds of well meaning Christians, as well as in the corrupt hearts of persecuting Usurpers, that without a legal incorporation of religious and civil polity, neither could be supported. A mutual independence is found most friendly to practical Religion, to social harmony, and to political prosperity.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Madison

The operations of the federal government will be most extensive and important in times of war and danger; those of the State governments, in times of peace and security.