Best 88 of Quantum mechanics quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 16 Sep

Daniel M. Greenberger

Einstein said that if quantum mechanics were correct then the world would be crazy. Einstein was right - the world is crazy.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Amit Ray

Universe is like a soup of consciousness. Brain is just a receiver. Awareness is continuously transforming thoughts into matter.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Arthur Henry Reginald Buller

There was a young lady named Bright, Whose speed was far faster than light; She started one day In a relative way, And returned on the previous night.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Amit Ray

Our subconscious thought patterns collapses the quantum wave function and generates the reality. Meditation is streamline the thought patterns.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Amit Ray

Enlightenment is like quantum tunneling - when everyone sees walls and barriers, enlightened one sees infinite possibilities.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Michio Kaku

The mind reels when we realize that, according to this interpretation of quantum mechanics, all possible worlds coexist with us. Although wormholes might be necessary to reach such alternate worlds, these quantum realities exist in the very same room that we live in. They coexist with us wherever we go.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Solange Nicole

People are romantic idiots in the ideals of courtship. When a person says they have x, y, and z, their romantic counterpart takes x, y, and z as distinct points in a person's timeline-versus the imperceptibly messy distances in between (and the attributed entanglement). Thus resulting in happily never afters.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Carlo Rovelli

A university student attending lectures on general relativity i the morning and others on quantum mechanics in the afternoon might be forgiven for thinking that his professors are fools, or have neglected to communicate with each other for at least a century.

By Anonym 16 Sep

John Gribbin

Heisenberg's uncertainty relation measures the amount by which the complementary descriptions of the electron, or other fundamental entities, overlap. Position is very much a particle property - particles can be located precisely. Waves, on the other hand, have no precise location, but they do have momentum. The more you know about the wave aspect of reality, the less you know about the particle, and vice versa. Experiments designed to detect particles always detect particles; experiments designed to detect waves always detect waves. No experiment shows the electron behaving like a wave and a particle at the same time.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ashish Dalela

A theory of reality must not only explain reality, but also knowledge about that reality because knowing reality is part of reality.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Jay Hosking

There are just some things that are outside of comprehension, even if we can quantify them. At some point, science becomes magic.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Louis De Broglie

Many scientists have tried to make determinism and complementarity the basis of conclusions that seem to me weak and dangerous; for instance, they have used Heisenberg's uncertainty principle to bolster up human free will, though his principle, which applies exclusively to the behavior of electrons and is the direct result of microphysical measurement techniques, has nothing to do with human freedom of choice. It is far safer and wiser that the physicist remain on the solid ground of theoretical physics itself and eschew the shifting sands of philosophic extrapolations.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Kevin Michel

To strengthen the connection between your conscious and subconscious, is to gain access to a map and compass, as you travel through parallel worlds.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Ruth Ozeki

To study the self is to forget the self. Maybe if you sat enough zazen, your sense of being a solid, singular self would dissolve and you could forget about it. What a relief. You could just hang out happily as part of an open-ended quantum array.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Lawrence Bragg

Everything in the future is a wave, everything in the past is a particle.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Quantum Mechanics can indeed be extremely complex to grasp, but when we talk about Consciousness, with decades of rigorous studies on the human brain we have realized that actually, there is no other phenomenon in the entire universe that is simpler than the majestic phenomenon of Consciousness. 'If you think you have a solution to the problem of consciousness, you haven’t understood the problem.' This age-old metaphysical and philosophical argument is strictly not true. If you are sufficiently clear-sighted enough, you can realize the problem itself was a matter of the past when we didn’t have insight into the neurological basis of consciousness. And today it is common knowledge in Neuroscience that, all mesmerizing features of the Human Mind, including the glorious Human Consciousness, are born from the tiny specks of jelly inside your head.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Gordon L. Kane

Another very good test some readers may want to look up, which we do not have space to describe here, is the Casimir effect, where forces between metal plates in empty space are modified by the presence of virtual particles. Thus virtual particles are indeed real and have observable effects that physicists have devised ways of measuring. Their properties and consequences are well established and well understood consequences of quantum mechanics.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Leon M. Lederman

One hundred thirty-seven is the inverse of something called the fine-structure constant. ...The most remarkable thing about this remarkable number is that it is dimension-free. ...Werner Heisenberg once proclaimed that all the quandaries of quantum mechanics would shrivel up when 137 was finally explained.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Greg Egan

There’s a cellular automaton called TVC. After Turing, von Neumann and Chiang. Chiang’s version was N-dimensional. That leaves plenty of room for data within easy reach. In two dimensions, the original von Neumann machine had to reach further and further - and wait longer and longer - for each successive bit of data. In a six-dimensional TVC automaton, you can have a three-dimensional grid of computers, which keeps on growing indefinitely - each with its own three-dimensional memory, which can also grow without bound. And when the simulated TVC universe being run on the physical computer is suddenly shut down, the best explanation for what I’ve witnessed will be a continuation of that universe - an extension made out of dust. Maria could almost see it: a vast lattice of computers, a seed of order in a sea of random noise, extending itself from moment to moment by sheer force of internal logic, “accreting” the necessary building blocks from the chaos of non-space-time by the very act of defining space and time.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Michio Kaku

It would take a civilization far more advanced than ours, unbelievably advanced, to begin to manipulate negative energy to create gateways to the past. But if you could obtain large quantities of negative energy—and that's a big “IF”—then you could create a time machine that apparently obeys Einstein's equation and perhaps the laws of quantum theory.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Stephen Hawking

To apply quantum theory to the entire universe... is tricky... particles of matter fired at a screen with two slits in it... exhibit interference patterns just as water waves do. Feynman showed that this arises because a particle does not have a unique history. That is, as it moves from its starting point A to some endpoint B, it doesn’t take one definite path, but rather simultaneously takes every possible path connecting the two points. From this point of view, interference is no surprise because, for instance, the particle can travel through both slits at the same time and interfere with itself. In this view, the universe appeared spontaneously, starting off in every possible way.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Christophe Galfard

The very small quantum world, it seems, is a mixture of possibilities. The quantum fields to which all particles belong are the sum of these possibilities and, somehow, one possibility is chosen out of all the existing ones just by seeing it, just by the very act of detecting it, whenever one tries to probe a particle's nature. Nobody knows why or how this happens.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Frank Wilczek

The answer to the ancient question 'Why is there something rather than nothing?' would then be that ‘nothing’ is unstable.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Kevin Michel

To shift your life in a desired direction, you must powerfully shift your subconscious.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Kevin Michel

To access your subconscious, is to access your 'higher-self.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Greg Egan

The TVC universe will never collapse. Never. A hundred billion years, a hundred trillion; it makes no difference, it will always be expanding. Entropy is not a problem. Actually, ‘expanding’ is the wrong word; the TVC universe grows like a crystal, it doesn’t stretch like a balloon. Think about it. Stretching ordinary space increases entropy; everything becomes more spread out, more disordered. Building more of a TVC cellular automaton just gives you more room for data, more computing power, more order. Ordinary matter would eventually decay, but these computers aren’t made out of matter. There’s nothing in the cellular automaton’s rules to prevent them from lasting forever. Durham’s universe - being made of the same “dust” as the real one, merely rearranged itself. The rearrangement was in time as well as space; Durham’s universe could take a point of space-time from just before the Big Crunch, and follow it with another from ten million years BC. And even if there was only a limited amount of “dust” to work with, there was no reason why it couldn’t be reused in different combinations, again and again. The fate of the TVC automaton would only have to make internal sense - and the thing would have no reason, ever, to come to an end.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Michael Frayn

Margrethe: And when all our eyes are closed, when even the ghosts have gone, what will be left of our beloved world? Our ruined and dishonoured and beloved world?

By Anonym 20 Sep

Sean Carroll

Where misunderstanding dwells, misuse will not be far behind. No theory in the history of science has been more misused and abused by cranks and charlatans—and misunderstood by people struggling in good faith with difficult ideas—than quantum mechanics.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Kevin Michel

There are many, many, many worlds branching out at each moment you become aware of your environment and then make a choice.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Sten F. Odenwald

Quantum fluctuations are, at their root, completely a-causal, in the sense that cause and effect and ordering of events in time is not a part of how these fluctuations work. Because of this, there seem not to be any correlations built into these kinds of fluctuations because 'law' as we understand the term requires some kind of cause-and-effect structure to pre-exist. Quantum fluctuations can precede physical law, but it seems that the converse is not true. So in the big bang, the establishment of 'law' came after the event itself, but of course even the concept of time and causality may not have been quite the same back then as they are now.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Kevin Michel

The subconscious mind is the guiding force for your entire life.

By Anonym 16 Sep

David Wick

It was about three o’clock at night when the final result of the calculation [which gave birth to quantum mechanics] lay before me. At first, I was deeply shaken. I was so excited that I could not think of sleep. So I left the house and awaited the sunrise on top of a rock. — Werner Heisenberg

By Anonym 18 Sep

Rochelle Forrester

The Copenhagen Interpretation has long been the orthodox view of the quantum world and this is not surprising considering how weird the alternatives are. However realism has usually been assumed in the macro world, but given the modern research into animal senses, neurology, and cognitive psychology, realism must inevitably cease to be a serious explanation of the macro world. It seems quite obvious the macro world is sense dependent and the orthodox interpretation of the quantum world postulates a sense dependent world as well. This suggests the same rules can apply to both the macro and quantum worlds which eliminates the need for a dividing line between the two worlds.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Rochelle Forrester

What causes the collapse of the wave function? It is the entry of stimuli into the sensory apparatus of a conscious observer, such as photons of the right wave length hitting the human eye and entering the eye through a lens which focuses the light on to the retina. The retina then sends a signal to the brain via the optic nerve and the brain turns the information into the images we see. Those images and information from the other senses constitute the human sensory world. Clearly the images and other information could not exist without observation. Nothing else in the human sensory world exists without an observation being made, so why should the results of experiments, indicating the presence of quantum entities, which show in macro level experimental apparatus be any different?

By Anonym 19 Sep

Solange Nicole

We are a manifestation that we perpetuate through space-time. Death is the ceasing of the observation of it whether by direct or indirect influence.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Connie Willis

Seriousness of mind was a prerequisite for understanding Newtonian physics. I am not convinced it is not a handicap in understanding quantum theory.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Kevin Michel

Physical reality does not require that we be pleased with its mechanism.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Vishwanath S J

If you love a woman at the realm of "Quantum Mechanics", then you have known her at the events before Big Bang!

By Anonym 18 Sep

Rajnar Vajra

She figured that the main problem in physics is physicists, that most of them are caught in a mind trap because they're so used to things being made of smaller things. So they instinctively believe that reality, at its most basic level, must be made up of and regulated by almost infinitely small elementary particles.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Kevin Michel

The nature of the 'collapse of the wave function' is determined by our self-concept stored in the subconscious mind. Our subconscious mind is aware of the 'many-worlds' occurring simultaneously and chooses the reality we continue to exist in based on our self-concept.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Kevin Michel

More than ninety-five percent of your brain activity, as you consciously read this sentence, is being used by your subconscious mind.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Wald Wassermann

We are Love experiencing itself, in myriad ways.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leonid V. Azaroff

Classical mechanics gave us a deterministic view of the world. Quantum mechanics, conversely, gives us a probabilistic view instead. According to Newton, if you know the cause af an event, you can predict the outcome. According to M.Born, you can only predict how likely that outcome will be.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Kevin Michel

You are deluded if you think that the world around you is a physical construct separate from your own mind.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Amit Ray

Quantum Machine Learning is defined as the branch of science and technology that is concerned with the application of quantum mechanical phenomena such as superposition, entanglement and tunneling for designing software and hardware to provide machines the ability to learn insights and patterns from data and the environment, and the ability to adapt automatically to changing situations with high precision, accuracy and speed.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Karl Popper

The belief in causality is metaphysical. It is nothing but a typical metaphysical hypostatization of a well-justified methodological rule- the scientist's decision never to abandon his search for laws. The metaphysical belief in causality seems thus more fertile in its various manifestations than any indeterminist physics metaphysics of the kind advocated by Heisenberg. Indeed, we can see that Heisenberg's comments have had a crippling effect on research. Connections which are not far to seek may easily be overlooked if its continually repeated that the search for any such connections is 'meaningless'.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Mario Livio

The strength of the familiar electromagnetic force between two electrons, for example, is expressed in physics in terms of a constant known as the fine structure constant. The value of this constant, almost exactly 1/137, has puzzled many generations of physicists. A joke made about the famous English physicist Paul Dirac (1902-1984), one of the founders of quantum mechanics, says that upon arrival to heaven he was allowed to ask God one question. His question was: "Why 1/137?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Kevin Michel

It is well understood in psychology that the subconscious mind has the dominant influence on human decision making, and therefore the pivotal role of the subconscious, for you to achieve success, is inescapable.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Jamal Nazrul Islam

Some people, including Hawking, think that we may be able to understand the big bang or the big crunch (in particular, whether time has a beginning or an end at these events) when we have a satisfactory quantum theory of gravitation.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Albert Einstein

The [quantum] theory reminds me a little of the system of delusions of an exceedingly intelligent paranoiac.