Best 1 069 of Jane Austen quotes - MyQuotes

Follow
Jane Austen
By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

But really, and upon my honour, I will try to do what I think to be wisest; and now, I hope you are satisfied.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

Well, my dear," said Mr. Bennet, when Elizabeth had read the note aloud, "if your daughter should have a dangerous fit of illness—if she should die, it would be a comfort to know that it was all in pursuit of Mr. Bingley, and under your orders.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

There was no being displeased with such an encourager, for his admiration made him discern a likeness before it was possible.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

Emma had no opportunity of speaking to Mr. Knightley till after supper; but, when they were all in the ballroom again, her eyes invited him irresistibly to come to her and be thanked.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

They were within twenty yards of each other, and so abrupt was his appearance, that it was impossible to avoid his sight. Their eyes instantly met, and the cheeks of each were overspread with the deepest blush. He absolutely started, and for a moment seemed immoveable from surprise; but shortly recovering himself, advanced towards the party, and spoke to Elizabeth, if not in terms of perfect composure, at least of perfect civility.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

Walter Scott has no business to write novels, especially good ones. He has fame and profit enough as a poet, and should not be taking the bread out of other people's mouths.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

It is very unfair to judge any body's conduct, without an intimate knowledge of their situation.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Jane Austen

She had the comfort of appearing very polite, while feeling very cross.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

I have been a selfish being all my life, in practice, though not in principle.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Jane Austen

The bells rang, and everybody smiled.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

Her husband was really deserving of her; independent of his peerage, his wealth, and his attachment, being to a precision the most charming young man in the world. Any further definition of his merits must be unnecessary; the most charming young man in the world is instantly before the imagination of us all.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Jane Austen

You are too sensible a girl to fall in love merely because you are warned against it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

But history, real solemn history, I cannot be interested in. Can you?" "Yes, I am fond of history." "I wish I were too. I read it a little as a duty, but it tells me nothing that does not either vex or weary me. The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars or pestilences, in every page; the men all so good for nothing, and hardly any women at all -- it is very tiresome.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

That will do extremely well, child. You have delighted us long enough. Let the other young ladies have time to exhibit.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

I will not say that your mulberry trees are dead; but I am afraid they're not alive.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

I wish I might take this for a compliment; but to be so easily seen through I am afraid is pitiful.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

her affection would be his forever.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

Time will generally lessen the interest of every attachment not within the daily circle.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

A woman must have a thorough knowledge of music, singing, drawing, dancing, and the modern languages; she must be well trained in the fighting styles of the Kyoto masters and the modern tactics and weaponry of Europe. And besides all this, she must possess a certain something in her air and manner of walking, the tone of her voice, her address and expressions, or the word will be but half-deserved. All this she must possess, and to all this she must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading, meditation, and Oriental discipline.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

Nobody minds having what is too good for them.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

A man would always wish to give a woman a better home than the one he takes her from; and he who can do it, where there is no doubt of her regard, must, I think, be the happiest of mortals.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

...And talking of the dear family party which would then be restored, of their mutual pursuits and cheerful society, as the only happiness worth a wish.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

I am not born to sit still and do nothing. If I lose the game, it shall not be from not striving for it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

I could not be happy with a man whose taste did not in every point coincide with my own. He must enter in all my feelings; the same books, the same music must charm us both.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

At my time of life opinions are tolerably fixed. It is not likely that I should now see or hear anything to change them.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

I would rather have young people settle on a small income at once, and have to struggle with a few difficulties together, than be involved in a long engagement.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

However, he wrote some verses on her, and very pretty they were.” “And so ended his affection,” said Elizabeth impatiently. “There has been many a one, I fancy, overcome in the same way. I wonder who first discovered the efficacy of poetry in driving away love!” “I have been used to consider poetry as the food of love,” said Darcy. “Of a fine, stout, healthy love it may. Everything nourishes what is strong already. But if it be only a slight, thin sort of inclination, I am convinced that one good sonnet will starve it entirely away.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

When I look out on such a night as this, I feel as if there could be neither wickedness nor sorrow in the world; and there certainly would be less of both if the sublimity of Nature were more attended to, and people were carried more out of themselves by contemplating such a scene.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Jane Austen

She was suddenly roused by the sound of the door-bell, and her spirits were a little fluttered by the idea of its being Colonel Fitzwilliam himself, who had once before called late in the evening, and might now come to inquire particularly after her. But this idea was soon banished, and her spirits were very differently affected, when, to her utter amazement, she saw Mr. Darcy walk into the room. In an hurried manner he immediately began an inquiry after her health, imputing his visit to a wish of hearing that she were better. She answered him with cold civility. He sat down for a few moments, and then getting up, walked about the room. Elizabeth was surprised, but said not a word. After a silence of several minutes, he came towards her in an agitated manner, and thus began: "In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

Give a girl an education and introduce her properly into the world

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

I have no pretensions whatever to that kind of elegance which consists in tormenting a respectable man.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

Emma; but you must think him agreeable. Can you lay your hand on your heart, and say you do not? - Indeed I can, Both Hands; and spread to their widest extent.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

I certainly must,' said she. 'This sensation of listlessness, weariness, stupidity, this disinclination to sit down and employ myself, this feeling of everything's being dull and insipid about the house! I must be in love; I should be the oddest creature in the world if I were not.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

Have you been lately in Sussex?" said Elinor. "I was at Norland about a month ago." "And how does dear, dear Norland look?" cried Marianne. "Dear, dear Norland," said Elinor, "probably looks much as it always does this time of year. The woods and walks thickly covered with dead leaves." "Oh!" cried Marianne, "with what transporting sensations have I formerly seen them fall! How have I delighted, as I walked, to see them driven in showers about me by the wind! What feelings have they, the season, the air altogether inspired! Now there is no one to regard them. They are seen only as a nuisance, swept hastily off, and driven much as possible from the sight." "It is not everyone," said Elinor, "who has your passion for dead leaves.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

A fondness for reading, which, properly directed, must be an education in itself.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

Portable property is happiness in a pocketbook.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

About thirty years ago, Miss Maria Ward of Huntingdon, with only seven thousand pounds, had the good luck to captivate Sir Thomas Bertram, of Mansfield Park, in the county of Northampton, and to be thereby raised to the rank of a baronet's lady, with all the comforts and consequences of an handsome house and large income.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

Pity is for this life, pity is the worm inside the meat, pity is the meat, pity is the shaking pencil, pity is the shaking voice-- not enough money, not enough love--pity for all of us--it is our grace, walking down the ramp or on the moving sidewalk, sitting in a chair, reading the paper, pity, turning a leaf to the light, arranging a thorn.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

A man who has nothing to do with his own time has no conscience in his intrusion on that of others.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

An interval of meditation, serious and grateful, was the best corrective of everything dangerous in such a high-wrought felicity; and she went to her room, and grew steadfast and fearless in the thankfulness of her enjoyment.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

Have a little compassion on my nerves. You tear them to pieces.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

Full many a flower is born to blush unseen, And waste its fragrance on the desert air.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

The less said the better.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

How little of permanent happiness could belong to a couple who were only brought together because their passions were stronger than their virtue.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

A persuadable temper might sometimes be as much in favour of happiness as a very resolute character.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

Elinor agreed to it all, for she did not think he deserved the compliment of rational opposition.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Jane Austen

my idea of good company.. is the company of clever, well-informed people. who have a great deal of conversation.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

I shall ever despise the man who can be gratified by the passion which he never wished to inspire, nor solicited the avowal of.