Best 1 069 of Jane Austen quotes - MyQuotes

Follow
Jane Austen
By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

I never wish to be parted from you from this day on

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

Vanity, not love, has been my folly.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

And here is my sweet little Annamaria,’ she added, tenderly caressing a little girl of three years old, who had not made a noise for the last two minutes; ‘And she is always so gentle and quiet—Never was there such a quiet little thing!’ But unfortunately in bestowing these embraces, a pin in her ladyship’s head dress slightly scratching the child’s neck, produced from this pattern of gentleness such violent screams, as could hardly be outdone by any creature professedly noisy. The mother’s consternation was excessive; but it could not surpass the alarm of the Miss Steeles, and every thing was done by all three, in so critical an emergency, which affection could suggest as likely to assuage the agonies of the little sufferer. She was seated in her mother’s lap, covered with kisses, her wound bathed with lavender-water, by one of the Miss Steeles, who was on her knees to attend her, and her mouth stuffed with sugar plums by the other. With such a reward for her tears, the child was too wise to cease crying.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

I take no leave of you, Miss Bennet: I send no compliments to your mother. You deserve no such attention. I am most seriously displeased.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

I should like balls infinitely better,' she replied, 'if they were carried on in a different manner; but there is something insufferably tedious in the usual process of such a meeting. It would surely be much more rational if conversation instead of dancing were made the order of they day.' 'Much more rational, my dear Caroline, I dare say, but it would not be near so much like a ball.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

it is a shocking trick for a young person to be always lolling upon a sofa.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

I declare, there is no enjoyment like reading.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

I do regard her as one who is too modest for the world in general to be aware of half her accomplishments, and too highly accomplished for modesty to be natural of any other woman.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

Essa é uma expressão, Sir John - disse Marianne, energicamente -, que eu particularmente detesto. Odeio todos os lugares-comuns com um subentendido picante; e "dar em cima de um homem" ou "fazer uma conquista" são os mais abomináveis de todos. Tendem à grosseria e à vulgaridade, e se a criação de tais expressões pôde alguma vez ser considerada inteligente, o tempo há muito destruiu toda essa engenhosidade.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

Laugh as much as you choose, but you will not laugh me out of my opinion.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

his feelings as to a first, strong attachment; sentences begun which he could not finish, his half averted eyes and more than half expressive glance; all, all declared that he had a heart returning to her at least; that anger, resentment, avoidance, were no more; and that they were succeeded, not merely by friendship or regard, but by the tenderness of the past. Yes, some share of the tenderness of the past. she could not contemplate the change as implying less. He must love her.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

It isn't what we say or think that defines us, but what we do.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

Good company requires only birth, education, and manners, and with regard to education is not very nice. Birth and good manners are essential; but a little learning is by no means a dangerous thing in good company; on the contrary, it will do very well.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

Emma; but you must think him agreeable. Can you lay your hand on your heart, and say you do not? - Indeed I can, Both Hands; and spread to their widest extent.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Jane Austen

Nothing was so likely to do her good as a little quiet cheerfulness at home.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

If you will thank me," he replied, "let it be for yourself alone. That the wish of giving happiness to you might add force to the other inducements which led me on, I shall not attempt to deny. But your family owe me nothing. Much as I respect them, I believe I thought only of you." Elizabeth was too much embarrassed to say a word. After a short pause, her companion added, "You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged; but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever." Elizabeth, feeling all the more than common awkwardness and anxiety of his situation, now forced herself to speak; and immediately, though not very fluently, gave him to understand that her sentiments had undergone so material a change since the period to which he alluded, as to make her receive with gratitude and pleasure his present assurances.The happiness which this reply produced was such as he had probably never felt before, and he expressed himself on the occasion as sensibly and as warmly as a man violently in love can be supposed to do.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

But Catherine did not know her own advantages - did not know that a good-looking girl, with an affectionate heart and a very ignorant mind, cannot fail of attracting a clever young man, unless circumstances are particularly untoward.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

Selfishness must always be forgiven you know, because there is no hope of a cure.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

Every young lady may feel for my heroine in this critical moment, for every young lady has at some time or other known the same agitation.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

I have frequently detected myself in such kind of mistakes... in a total misapprehension of character at some point or other: fancying people so much more gay or grave, or ingenious or stupid than they really are, and I can hardly tell why, or in what the deception originated. Sometimes one is guided by what other people say of them, without giving oneself time to deliberate and judge.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

An interval of meditation, serious and grateful, was the best corrective of everything dangerous in such a high-wrought felicity; and she went to her room, and grew steadfast and fearless in the thankfulness of her enjoyment.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

It taught me to hope, as I had scarcely ever allowed myself to hope before.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Jane Austen

Walter Scott has no business to write novels, especially good ones. — It is not fair. — He has fame and profit enough as a poet, and should not be taking the bread out of other people’s mouths. — I do not like him, and do not mean to like Waverley if I can help it — but fear I must.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

Fortunately for those who pay their court through such foibles, a fond mother, though, in pursuit of praise for her children, the most rapacious of human beings, is likewise the most credulous; her demands are exorbitant; but she will swallow any thing.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

And sometimes I have kept my feelings to myself, because I could find no language to describe them in.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

Elinor agreed to it all, for she did not think he deserved the compliment of rational opposition.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Jane Austen

Može li iko upoznati nečiju narav u Batu, ili na kojem drugom javnom mestu... Sve je to ništavno; ne može se tako ništa znati. Samo kada čovek vidi ženu u njenom domu, među njenim prijateljima, onakvu kakva je uvek. Tek onda može da stekne ispravno mišljenje. Sve drugo je sreća i nagađanje - a često se ispostavi da je zla sreća.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

An agreeable manner may set off handsome features, but can never alter plain ones.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

But are they all horrid, are you sure they are all horrid? [Referring to Gothic novels, fashionable in England at the beginning of the 19th century, but frowned upon in polite society.]

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

In time, we found a common interest in poetry. He reads nothing else. Day in, day out. Never happier he is than when reading impassioned descriptions of hopeless agony or sundered hearts destroyed by wretchedness.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

There is safety in reserve, but no attraction. One cannot love a reserved person.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

Marry me. Marry me, my wonderful, darling friend.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

—Es cierto que no tengo la facilidad que poseen otros —señaló Darcy— de conversar con soltura con aquellos que no conocen. No puedo ceñirme al tono de su conversación, ni fingirme interesado por sus asuntos, como veo hacer tan a menudo.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

Did not you? I did for you. But that is one great difference between us. Compliments always take you by surprise, and me never.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

In every power, of which taste is the foundation, excellence is pretty fairly divided between the sexes.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

My good qualities are under your protection, and you are to exaggerate them as much as possible; and, in return, it belongs to me to find occasion for teasing and quarreling with you as often as may be.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

His cold politeness, his ceremonious grace, were worse than anything.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Jane Austen

Y ahora te doy ese consentimiento a ti, si es que estás decidida a unirte a él. Pero déjame aconsejarte que lo pienses bien. Conozco tu temperamento, Lizzy. Sé que no podrías ser feliz ni respetable si no quisieras de verdad a tu marido, si no lo miraras como a alguien superior. Tu inteligencia y tu ingenio te expondrían a grandes peligros en un matrimonio desigual. Difícilmente escaparías al descrédito y la desdicha. Hija mía, no me inflijas el dolor de verte incapaz de respetar a tu compañero en la vida. No sabes bien el riesgo que corres.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

Lovely & too charming Fair one, notwithstanding your forbidding Squint, your greazy tresses & your swelling Back, which are more frightful than imagination can paint or pen describe, I cannot refrain from expressing my raptures, at the engaging Qualities of your Mind, which so amply atone for the Horror, with which your first appearance must ever inspire the unwary visitor.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

You men have none of you any hearts.' 'If we have not hearts, we have eyes; and they give us torment enough.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

How wonderful, how very wonderful the operations of time, and the changes of the human mind!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

With men he can be rational and unaffected, but when he has ladies to please, every feature works.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

You ought certainly to forgive them as a Christian, but never to admit them in your sight, or allow their names to be mentioned in your hearing.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jane Austen

The family of Dashwood had long been settled in Sussex. Their estate was large, and their residence was at Norland Park, in the centre of their property, where, for many generations, they had lived in so respectable a manner as to engage the general good opinion of their surrounding acquaintance. The late owner of this estate was a single man, who lived to a very advanced age, and who for many years of his life, had a constant companion and housekeeper in his sister.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jane Austen

I do not think I ever opened a book in my life which had not something to say upon woman's inconstancy. Songs and proverbs, all talk of woman's fickleness. But perhaps you will say, these were all written by men.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Jane Austen

You are in a melancholy humour, and fancy that any one unlike yourself must be happy. But remember that the pain of parting from friends will be felt by every body at times, whatever be their education or state. Know your own happiness. You want nothing but patience — or give it a more fascinating name, call it hope.