Best 1 289 of Ethics quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 19 Sep

Peter Singer

There are some things that, once lost, no amount of money can regain. Thus to justify the destruction of an ancient forest on the grounds that it will earn us substantial export income is problematic, even if we could invest that income and increase its value from year to year; for no matter how much we increase its value, its could never buy back the link with the past represented by the forest.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Hubie Brown

TALENT and WORK ETHIC, the most important and RARE combination.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Robert V. Taylor

Secure in whom we are, rooted in one particular tradition or none at all, we have no reason to fear discovering God in the truth and wisdom of many traditions. Love casts out fear inviting us into happiness for all people and Creation.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Baruch Spinoza

Let unswerving integrity be your watchword.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Henri Poincare

Pure analysis puts at our disposal a multitude of procedures whose infallibility it guarantees; it opens to us a thousand different ways on which we can embark in all confidence; we are assured of meeting there no obstacles; but of all these ways, which will lead us most promptly to our goal? Who shall tell us which to choose? We need a faculty which makes us see the end from afar, and intuition is this faculty. It is necessary to the explorer for choosing his route; it is not less so to the one following his trail who wants to know why he chose it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

What is morality but immemorial custom? Conscience is the chief of conservatives.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Berger

Without ethics man has no future. This is to say mankind without them cannot be itself. Ethics determine choices and actions and suggest difficult priorities.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Thomas Aquinas

If the citizens themselves devote their life to matters of trade, the way will be opened to many vices. Since the foremost tendency of tradesmen is to make money, greed is awakened in the hearts of the citizens through the pursuit of trade. The result is that everything in the city will bcome venal; good faith will be destroyed and the way opened to all kinds of trickery; each one will work only for his own profit, despising the public good; the cultivation of virtue will fail since honor, virtue's reward, will be bestowed upon the rich. Thus, in such a city, civic life will necessarily be corrupted. (On Kingship II, 3)

By Anonym 17 Sep

Baruch Spinoza

Nothing forbids man to enjoy himself, save grim and gloomy superstition

By Anonym 19 Sep

Suzy Kassem

Truth is in all our hearts. He who stands by his heart has God in him. Our conscience is what unites us with God.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Hugo Ball

Everywhere, the ethical predicament of our time imposes itself with an urgency which suggests that even the question Have we anything to eat? will be answered not in material but in ethical terms.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Auberon Herbert

To live in a state of liberty is not to live apart from law. It is, on the contrary, to live under the highest law, the only law that can really profit a man, the law which is consciously and deliberately imposed by himself on himself.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert V. Taylor

Courage to be who you are is the cousin of loving the Divine, yourself and others.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Peter Singer

Their reliance on biblical quotations does not augur well for their for their openness to moral reasoning....

By Anonym 13 Sep

Christopher Marlowe

Goodness is beauty in the best estate.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jonathan Wittenberg

There is no spirituality without ethics

By Anonym 16 Sep

Simone De Beauvoir

Ethics is the triumph of freedom over facticity.

By Anonym 16 Sep

G. E. Moore

For it is the business of Ethics, I must insist, not only to obtain true results, but also to find valid reasons for them.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Karl Wilhelm Friedrich Schlegel

Where there is politics or economics, there is no morality.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert Staughton Lynd

Any of us can achieve virtue, if by virtue we merely mean the avoidance of the vices that do not attract us.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Sarah Blake

Undismayed by the ordinary evil of the world, he had the place and the power to make good, to do good. And he did so. He believed one could do right. He had been raised to expect that one could. His was the last generation for whom those givens remained as undisturbed as a silk purse.

By Anonym 13 Sep

William Shakespeare

Is there no respect of place, persons, nor time in you?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ralph Waldo Emerson

The meaning of good and bad, of better and worse, is simply helping or hurting.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jack Nicklaus

Nick O'Leary loves to compete. His work ethic is fantastic, and that's what I like about him. He works, and works, and works; and if he has to get better, he gets better.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Gautama Buddha

Never by hatred is hatred appeased, but it is appeased by kindness. This is an eternal truth.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Simon Du Plock

Modern civilisation does not generate an ethical framework for human life.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

You cannot receive a shock unless you have an electric affinity for that which shocks you.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Thomas Friedman

If you don't have an ethic of conservation, you basically have a license to drive a Hummer through the Amazon.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Peter Singer

No doubt we instinctively prefer to help those who are close to us. Few could stand by and watch a child drown; many can ignore the avoidable deaths of children in Africa or India. The question, however, is not what we usually do, but what we ought to do, and it is difficult to see any sound moral justification for the view that distance, or community membership, makes a crucial difference to our obligations.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Daniel Waterman

With drug use related harms, explanatory models are often presented as predictive tools, even though they ‘are [rarely if ever] predictive of consequent behavior’ or outcomes. Hence, we feel confident in asserting at outset, that prohibition based approaches in drug policy lack a sound basis in empirical research (despite sounding logical, i.e. remove drugs or the means of their production and less drugs will be available to users, thus minimising or eliminating harm), and are not animated by well-defined goals, goals that are not only consistent with the ethical and humanitarian aims of public health policy in general, but also with the fundamental principles of democracy) such as empowering or enabling those best placed to act, but by beliefs, assumptions, hypotheses and expectations.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Martin Luther King Jr.

Through our scientific and technological genius we've made of this world a neighborhood. And now through our moral and ethical commitment we must make of it a brotherhood. We must all learn to live together as brothers—or we will all perish together as fools.

By Anonym 16 Sep

G. E. Moore

If indeed good were a feeling....then it would exist in time. But that is why to call it so is to commit the naturalistic fallacy. It will always remain pertinent to ask, whether the feeling itself is good; and if do, then good cannot itself be identical with any feeling.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Baruch Spinoza

The good which every man, who follows after virtue, desires for himself he will also desire for other men...

By Anonym 13 Sep

Andrew Carnegie

A business is seldom if ever built up except on lines of strictest integrity.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Joanne Harris

If you want something you can have it, but you have to do some work. It's the ethic my mother brought me up with.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Patti Smith

What a model of an artist was for me was an artist who worked. Picasso was the ultimate model, because the work ethic he had.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Winston Churchill

Ethics evolve naturally, and we trample upon them with laws created by reason and experience.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Noam Chomsky

... if we adopt the principle of universality: if an action is right (or wrong) for others, it is right (or wrong) for us. Those who do not rise to the minimal moral level of applying to themselves the standards they apply to others -- more stringent ones, in fact -- plainly cannot be taken seriously when they speak of appropriateness of response; or of right and wrong, good and evil

By Anonym 16 Sep

Charlie Jane Anders

I think that the most basic thing of ethics is being aware of how your actions affect others, and having an awareness of what they want and how they feel.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Langdon Elwyn Mitchell

If we cannot be decent, let us endeavor to be graceful. If we can't be moral, at least we can avoid being vulgar.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Kristin Cashore

It was starting to seem to her that being "forward-thinking" too often involved avoiding any kind of thought at all - especially about things that might benefit from a great deal of thinking.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Sam Harris

If you imagine a world of real abundance. Like a world where we built the right AI that's just pulling wealth out of the atmosphere and no one really has to work anymore, because we literally have machines that can build machines that can build machines, that are all powered by sunlight, that do everything better than we can. Now why wouldn't that be some kind of utopia? Well it wouldn't be a utopia because we have these very weird emotions, or many of us do, that make it seem like it would be wrong to spread the wealth around. Most people are living as though they want to live in a world where there's a few trillionaires living in compounds ringed by razor wire, and everyone else is sort of starving to death. It's like a winner take all scenario. And so, we have to find a new ethic whereby people are no longer—their purchase on existence is no longer justified by doing profitable work that other people will pay them for. In a world of true abundance you shouldn't have to work to justify your life. You should be free to enjoy the wealth of the world. If we are going to get to that place, we have to change our ethics around that.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Friedrich Schleiermacher

Now the relation which, in the sphere of nature, being and semblance or sensation bear to one another in this antithesis, is the same as that which in ethics exists between good and pleasure or feeling.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Immanuel Kant

It is impossible to conceive anything at all in the world, or even out of it, which can be taken as good without qualification, except a good will.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susan Sontag

A six-week trip to China in 1973 convinced me—if I needed convincing—that the autonomy of the aesthetic is something to be protected, and cherished, as indispensable nourishment to intelligence. But a decade-long residence in the 1960s, with its inexorable conversion of moral and political radicalisms into “style,” has convinced me of the perils of over- generalizing the aesthetic view of the world.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ayn Rand

But of all the deadly theories by means of which you are now being destroyed, I would like to warn you about one of the deadliest and most crucial: the alleged dichotomy of science and ethics. It is the doctrine that man's science and ethics - or his knowledge and values, or his body and soul - are two separate, antagonistic aspects of his existence, and that man is caught between them, as a precarious, permanent traitor to their conflicting demands.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Peter Singer

If 10 percent of the population were to take a consciously ethical outlook on life and act accordingly, the resulting change would be more significant than any change of government,

By Anonym 18 Sep

Fernando Savater

¿Sabes cuál es la única obligación que tenemos en esta vida? Pues no ser imbéciles. La palabra «imbécil» es más sustanciosa de lo que parece, no te vayas a creer. Viene del latín baculus que significa «bastón»: el imbécil es el que necesita bastón para caminar. Que no se enfaden con nosotros los cojos ni los ancianitos, porque el bastón al que nos referimos no es el que se usa muy legítimamente para ayudar a sostenerse y dar pasitos a un cuerpo quebrantado por algún accidente o por la edad. El imbécil puede ser todo lo ágil que se quiera y dar brincos como una gacela olímpica, no se trata de eso. Si el imbécil cojea no es de los pies, sino del ánimo: es su espíritu el debilucho y cojitranco, aunque su cuerpo pegue unas volteretas de órdago. Hay imbéciles de varios modelos, a elegir: a) El que cree que no quiere nada, elque dice que todo le da igual, el que vive en un perpetuo bostezo o en siesta permanente, aunque tenga los ojos abiertos y no ronque. b) El que cree que lo quiere todo, lo primero que se le presenta y lo contrario de lo que se le presenta: marcharse y quedarse, bailar y estar sentado, masticar ajos y dar besos sublimes, todo a la vez. c) El que no sabe lo que quiere ni se molesta en averiguarlo. Imita los quereres de sus vecinos o les lleva la contraria porque sí, todo lo que hace está dictado por la opinión mayoritaria de los que le rodean: es conformista sin reflexión o rebelde sin causa. d) El que sabe que quiere y sabe lo que quiere y, más o menos, sabe por qué lo quiere pero lo quiere flojito, con miedo o con poca fuerza. A fin de cuentas, termina siempre haciendo lo que no quiere y dejando lo que quiere para mañana, a ver si entonces se encuentra más entonado. e) El que quiere con fuerza y ferocidad, en plan bárbaro, pero se ha engañado a sí mismo sobre lo que es la realidad, se despista enormemente y termina confundiendo la buena vida con aquello que va a hacerle polvo. Todos estos tipos de imbecilidad necesitan bastón, es decir, necesitan apoyarse en cosas de fuera, ajenas, que no tienen nada que ver con la libertad y la reflexión propias. Siento decirte que los imbéciles suelen acabar bastante mal, crea lo que crea la opinión vulgar. Cuando digo que «acaban mal» no me refiero a que terminen en la cárcel o fulminados por un rayo (eso sólo suele pasar en las películas), sino que te aviso de que suelen fastidiarse a sí mismos y nunca logran vivir la buena vida esa que tanto nos apetece a ti y a mí. Y todavía siento más tener que informarte qué síntomas de imbecilidad solemos tener casi todos; vamos, por lo menos yo me los encuentro un día sí y otro también, ojalá a ti te vaya mejor en el invento... Conclusión: ¡alerta!, ¡en guardia!, ¡la imbecilidad acecha y no perdona!

By Anonym 17 Sep

Peter Singer

...moral relativism, a position many find attractive only until they are faced with someone who is doing something really, really wrong.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Scott K. Edinger

Integrity, by its definition, means adhering consistently to a strong, reliable code of ethics, whatever that code is.