Best 140 of Oliver Sacks quotes - MyQuotes

Follow
Oliver Sacks
By Anonym 13 Sep

Oliver Sacks

I cannot pretend I am without fear. But my predominant feeling is one of gratitude. I have loved and been loved; I have been given much and I have given something in return; I have read and traveled and thought and written. I have had an intercourse with the world, the special intercourse of writers and readers.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Oliver Sacks

there  are  other  senses  -­  secret  senses,  sixth  senses,  if  you  will  -­  equally  vital,  but  unrecognized,  and  unlauded.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Oliver Sacks

My predominant feeling is one of gratitude. I have loved and been loved. I have been given much and I have given something in return. Above all, I have been a sentient being, a thinking animal, on this beautiful planet, and that in itself has been an enormous privilege and adventure.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Oliver Sacks

I feel I should be trying to complete my life, whatever completing a life means.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Oliver Sacks

And I often dream of chemistry at night, dreams that conflate the past and the present, the grid of the periodic table transformed to the grid of Manhattan. […] Sometimes, too, I dream of the indecipherable language of tin (a confused memory, perhaps, of its plaintive “cry”). But my favorite dream is of going to the opera (I am Hafnium), sharing a box at the Met with the other heavy transition metals—my old and valued friends—Tantalum, Rhenium, Osmium, Iridium, Platinum, Gold, and Tungsten.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Sign language is the equal of speech, lending itself equally to the rigorous and the poetic, to philosophical analysis or to making love.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Music, uniquely among the arts, is both completely abstract and profoundly emotional.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Fascinating, Doidge's book is a remarkable and hopeful portrait of the endless adaptability of the human brain.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Oliver Sacks

I think hallucinations need to be discussed. There are all sorts of hallucinations, and then many sorts which are okay, like the ones I think which most of us have in bed at night before we fall asleep, when we can see all sorts of patterns or faces and scenes.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Oliver Sacks

I suspect that music has qualities both of speech and writing - partly built in, partly individually constructed - and this goes on all through one's life.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Oliver Sacks

To live on a day-to-day basis is insufficient for human beings; we need to transcend, transport, escape; we need meaning, understanding, and explanation; we need to see over-all patterns in our lives. We need hope, the sense of a future. And we need freedom (or, at least, the illusion of freedom) to get beyond ourselves, whether with telescopes and microscopes and our ever-burgeoning technology, or in states of mind that allow us to travel to other worlds, to rise above our immediate surroundings. We may seek, too, a relaxing of inhibitions that makes it easier to bond with each other, or transports that make our consciousness of time and mortality easier to bear. We seek a holiday from our inner and outer restrictions, a more intense sense of the here and now, the beauty and value of the world we live in.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Oliver Sacks

The power of music, narrative and drama is of the greatest practical and theoretical importance. ... We see how the retarded, unable to perform fairly simple tasks involving perhaps four or five movements or procedures in sequence, can do these perfectly if they work to music.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Oliver Sacks

The past which is not recoverable in any other way is embedded, as if in amber, in the music, and people can regain a sense of identity.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Oliver Sacks

My own first love was biology. I spent a great part of my adolescence in the Natural History museum in London (and I still go to the Botanic Garden almost every day, and to the Zoo every Monday). The sense of diversity of the wonder of innumerable forms of life has always thrilled me beyond anything else.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Oliver Sacks

It seems that the brain always has to be active, and if the auditory parts of the brain are not getting sufficient input, then they may start to create hallucinatory sounds on their own. Although it is curious that they do not usually create noises or voices; they create music.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Oliver Sacks

The brain is more than an assemblage of autonomous modules, each crucial for a specific mental function. Every one of these functionally specialized areas must interact with dozens or hundreds of others, their total integration creating something like a vastly complicated orchestra with thousands of instruments, an orchestra that conducts itself, with an ever-changing score and repertoire.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Oliver Sacks

When I was five, I am told, and asked what my favorite things in the world were, I answered, smoked salmon and Bach.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Oliver Sacks

It takes a special energy, over and above one's creative potential, a special audacity or subversiveness, to strike out in a new direction once one is settled. It is a gamble as all creative projects must be, for the new direction may not turn out to be productive at all.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Oliver Sacks

I feel a sudden clear focus and perspective. There is no time for anything inessential.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Oliver Sacks

In terms of brain development, musical performance is every bit as important educationally as reading or writing.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Thus the feeling I sometimes have - which all of us who work closely with aphasiacs have - that one cannot lie to an aphasiac. He cannot grasp your words, and cannot be deceived by them; but what he grasps he grasps with infallible precision, namely the expression that goes with the words, the total, spontaneous, involuntary expressiveness which can never be simulated or faked, as words alone can, too easily.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Oliver Sacks

There is only one cardinal rule: One must always listen to the patient.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Biologically, physiologically, we are not so different from each other; historically, as narratives - we are each of us unique.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Waking consciousness is dreaming – but dreaming constrained by external reality

By Anonym 15 Sep

Oliver Sacks

A union of literary and scientific cultures – there was not the dissociation of sensibility that was so soon to come ... Davy himself was writing (and sometimes publishing) a good deal of poetry at the time; his notebooks mix details of chemical experiments, poems, and philosophical reflections all together; and these did not seem to exist in separate compartments in his mind.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Oliver Sacks

To be ourselves we must have ourselves – possess, if need be re-possess, our life-stories. We must “recollect” ourselves, recollect the inner drama, the narrative, of ourselves. A man needs such a narrative, a continuous inner narrative, to maintain his identity, his self.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Oliver Sacks

In general, people are afraid to acknowledge hallucinations because they immediately see them as a sign of something awful happening to the brain, whereas in most cases theyre not.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Music can lift us out of depression or move us to tears - it is a remedy, a tonic, orange juice for the ear. But for many of my neurological patients, music is even more - it can provide access, even when no medication can, to movement, to speech, to life. For them, music is not a luxury, but a necessity.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Music can lift us out of depression or move us to tears - it is a remedy, a tonic, orange juice for the ear.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Although I think it is wonderful to have the whole world of music available in something that small and to have it conveyed with such fidelity almost straight into the brain, I think the technology is also a danger.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Oliver Sacks

We have, each of us, a life story, whose continuity, whose sense, is our lives.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Memory is dialogic and arises not only from direct experience but from the intercourse of many minds.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Oliver Sacks

There was an irony and a paradox here: Franco thought of Pontito constantly, saw it in fantasy, depicted it, as infinitely desirable – and yet he had a profound reluctance to return. But it is precisely such a paradox that lies at the heart of nostalgia – for nostalgia is about a fantasy that never takes place, one that maintains itself by not being fulfilled. And yet such fantasies are not just idle daydreams or fancies; they press toward some fulfillment, but an indirect one - the fulfillment of art. These, at least, are the terms that D. Geahchan, the French psychoanalyst, has used. With reference in particular to the greatest of nostalgies, Proust, the psychoanalyst David Werman speaks of an 'aesthetic crystallization of nostalgia' - nostalgia raised to the level of art and myth.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Oliver Sacks

I have to live in the richest, deepest, most productive way I can

By Anonym 14 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Music can move us to the heights or depths of emotion. It can persuade us to buy something, or remind us of our first date. It can lift us out of depression when nothing else can. It can get us dancing to its beat. But the power of music goes much, much further. Indeed, music occupies more areas of our brain than language does-humans are a musical species.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Music originally had a social function. You were in church, in a concert hall, a marching band; you were dancing. I'm concerned that music could be too separated from its roots and just become a pleasure-giving experience, like a drug.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Very young children love and demand stories, and can understand complex matters presented as stories, when their powers of comprehending general concepts, paradigms, are almost nonexistent.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Oliver Sacks

...when the brain is released from the constraints of reality, it can generate any sound, image, or smell in its repertoire, sometimes in complex and "impossible" combinations".

By Anonym 13 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Above all, I have been a sentient being, a thinking animal, on this beautiful planet, and that in itself has been an enormous privilege and adventure.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Our tests, our approaches...are ridiculously inadequate. They only show us deficits, they do not show us powers; they only show us puzzles and schemata, when we need to see music, narrative, play, a being conducting itself spontaneously in its own natural way.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Muscular dystrophy ... was never seen until Duchenne described it in the 1850s. By 1860, after his original description, many hundreds of cases had been recognised and described, so much so that Charcot said: 'How is it that a disease so common, so widespread, and so recognisable at a glance - a disease which has doubtless always existed - how is it that it is recognised only now? Why did we need M. Duchenne to open our eyes?'

By Anonym 19 Sep

Oliver Sacks

What could we do? What should we do? 'There are no prescriptions,' Luria wrote, 'in a case like this. Do whatever your ingenuity and your heart suggest. There is little or no hope of any recovery in his memory. But a man does not consist of memory alone. He has feeling, will, sensibilities, moral being - matters of which neuropsychology cannot speak. And it is here, beyond the realm of an impersonal psychology, that you may find ways to touch him, and change him. [...] Neuropsychologically, there is little or nothing you can do; but in the realm of the Individual, there may be much you can do.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Oliver Sacks

When the neglect is severe, the patient may behave almost as if one half of the universe had abruptly ceased to exist in any meaningful form.... Patients with unilateral neglect behave not only as if nothing were actually happening in the left hemispace, but also as if nothing of any importance could be expected to occur there.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Even when other powers have been lost and people may not even be able to understand language, they will nearly always recognize and respond to familiar tunes. And not only that. The tunes may carry them back and may give them memory of scenes and emotions otherwise unavailable for them.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Music has a bonding power, it's primal social cement

By Anonym 14 Sep

Oliver Sacks

Music is...a fundamental way of expressing our humanity - and it is often our best medicine.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Oliver Sacks

If a man has lost a leg or an eye, he knows he has lost a leg or an eye; but if he has lost a self—himself—he cannot know it, because he is no longer there to know it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Oliver Sacks

To live on a day-to-day basis is insufficient; we need to transcend, transport, escape; we need meaning, understanding, and explanation; we need to see over-all patterns in our lives. We need hope, the sense of a future; the freedom to get beyond ourselves...in states of mind that allow us to rise above our immediate surroundings and see the beauty and value of the world we live in.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Oliver Sacks

The real functional "machinery" of the brain, for Edelman, consists of millions of neuronal groups, organized into larger units or "maps". These maps, continually conversing in everchanging, unimaginably complex, but always meaningful patterns, may change in minutes or seconds. One is reminded of C. S. Sherrington's poetic evocation of the brain as "an enchanted loom", where "millions of flashing shuttles weave a dissolving pattern, always a meaningful pattern though never an abiding one; a shifting harmony of subpatterns".

By Anonym 16 Sep

Oliver Sacks

If the students were taught about shuttle flights, plate tectonics and submarine volcanoes, they were also immersed in the traditional myths of their culture—the ancient story, for example, of how the island of Pohnpei had been built under the direction of a mystical octopus, Lidakika. (I was fascinated by this, for it was the only cephalopod creation myth I had ever heard.