Best 209 of Diane Ackerman quotes - MyQuotes

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Diane Ackerman
By Anonym 15 Sep

Diane Ackerman

We live on the leash of our senses.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Words are such small things, like confetti in the brain, and yet they are color and clarify everything, they can stain the mind or warp the feelings.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Life is a thing that mutates without warning, not always in enviable ways. All part of the improbable adventure of being alive, of being a brainy biped with giant dreams on a crazy blue planet.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Diane Ackerman

It's like having a head full of holes, in which the perfect repository of words have shamed themselves," he lamented.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Look at your feet. You are standing in the sky. When we think of the sky, we tend to look up, but the sky actually begins at the earth. We walk through it, yell into it, rake leaves, wash the dog, and drive cars in it. We breathe it deep within us. With every breath, we inhale millions of molecules of sky, heat them briefly, and then exhale them back into the world.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Diane Ackerman

There was nothing to do but wait. It is always like this for naturalists, and for poets--the long hours of travel and preparation, and then the longer hours of waiting. All for that one electric, pulse-revving vision when the universe suddenly declares itself.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Diane Ackerman

We would lie on coral sand, below sugary stars, watching Cassiopeia mount her throne and the Great Bear wash its paws in the South. I would say, "I have a secret to tell you." And, folding me in your arms, boyish and sly, you would answer: "Whisper it into my mouth.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Diane Ackerman

We try to exile ourselves more and more from nature - not always consciously: We build houses; we dismiss nature; nature has to be outside, because we're inside. God forbid something like a cockroach comes inside, or some dust.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Violets smell like burnt sugar cubes that have been dipped in lemon and velvet.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Diane Ackerman

When you consider something like death, after which (there being no news flash to the contrary) we may well go out like a candle flame, then it probably doesn't matter if we try too hard, are awkward sometimes, care for one another too deeply, are excessively curious about nature, are too open to experience, enjoy a nonstop expense of the senses in an effort to know life intimately and lovingly.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Diane Ackerman

And yet, words are the passkeys to our souls. Without them, we can't really share the enormity of our lives.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Diane Ackerman

In rare moments of deep play, we can lay aside our sense of self, shed time's continuum, ignore pain, and sit quietly in the absolute present, watching the world's ordinary miracles. No mind or heart hobbles. No analyzing or explaining. No questing for logic. No promises. No goals. No relationships. No worry. One is completely open to whatever drama may unfold.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Diane Ackerman

In the absence of touching and being touched, people of all ages can sicken and grow touched starved. Touch seems to be as essential as sunlight.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Our sense of safety depends on predictability, so anything living outside the usual rules we suspect to be an outlaw, a ghoul.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Diane Ackerman

For me, life offers so many complexly appealing moments that two beautiful objects may be equally beautiful for different reasons and at different times. How can one choose?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Diane Ackerman

It's essential to tailor rehab to what impassions someone. The brain gradually learns by riveting its attention-through endless repetitions.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Diane Ackerman

So often loneliness comes from being out of touch with parts of oneself. We go searching for those parts in other people, but there's a difference between feeling separate from others and separate from oneself.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Diane Ackerman

We think of it as a sort of traffic accident of the heart. It is an emotion that scares us more than cruelty, more than violence, more than hatred. We allow ourselves to be foiled by the vagueness of the word. After all, love requires the utmost vulnerability. We equip someone with freshly sharpened knives; strip naked; then invite him to stand close. What could be scarier?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Diane Ackerman

the biggest threat to the religious experience may well come from organized religion itself.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Play is our brain's favorite way of learning

By Anonym 15 Sep

Diane Ackerman

What an odd, ruminating, noisy, self-interrupting conversation we conduct with ourselves from birth to death.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Diane Ackerman

I believe consciousness is brazenly physical, a raucous mirage the brain creates to help us survive.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Writing is my form of celebration and prayer.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Diane Ackerman

If we mammals don't get something to eat every day or two, our temperature drops, all our signs fall off, and we begin to starve. Living at biological red alert, it's not surprising how obsessed we are with food; I'm just amazed we don't pace and fret about it all the time.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Human beings are sloshing sacks of chemicals on the move.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Part of the irony of environmentalism is questing for solutions when you know you're part of the problem.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Variety is the pledge that matter makes to living things.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Home is where the heart is, we say, rubbing the flint of one abstraction against another.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Who you are isn't tied solely to what you say, even though it may feel that way to you now.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Diane Ackerman

A flower's fragrance declares to all the world that it is fertile, available, and desirable, its sex organs oozing with nectar. Its smell reminds us in vestigial ways of fertility, vigor, life-force, all the optimism, expectancy, and passionate bloom of youth. We inhale its ardent aroma and, no matter what our ages, we feel young and nubile in a world aflame with desire.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Diane Ackerman

When I go biking, I am mentally far far away from civilization. The world is breaking someone else's heart.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Diane Ackerman

I'm an Earth ecstatic, and my creed is simple: All life is sacred, life loves life, and we are capable of improving our behavior toward one another. As basic as that is, for me it's also tonic and deeply spiritual, glorifying the smallest life-form and embracing the most distant stars.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Diane Ackerman

One can live at a low flame. Most people do. For some, life is an exercise in moderation (best china saved for special occasions), but given something like death, what does it matter if one looks foolish now and then, or tries too hard, or cares too deeply?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Diane Ackerman

No matter how politely one says it, we owe our existence to the farts of blue-green algae.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Complexity excites the mind, and order rewards it. In the garden, one finds both, including vanishingly small orders too complex to spot, and orders so vast the mind struggles to embrace them.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Though most of us don't hunt, our eyes are still the great monopolists of our senses. To taste or touch your enemy or your food, you have to be unnervingly close to it. To smell or hear it, you can risk being further off. But vision can rush through the fields and up the mountains, travel across time, country, and parsecs of outer space, and collect bushel baskets of information as it goes. Animals that hear high frequencies better than we do

By Anonym 13 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Habitats keep evolving new pageants of species, and we shouldn't interfere.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Diane Ackerman

One of the keystones of romantic love - and also of the ecstatic religion practiced by mystics - is the powerful desire to become one with the beloved.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Diane Ackerman

For if I do something, I never do it thoughtlessly.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Diane Ackerman

It's so acceptably easy for a woman not to strive too hard, not to be too adventure-crazed, not to take too many risks, not to enjoy sex with full candor ... It isn't seemly for a woman to have that much zest.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Success produces success, just as money produces money.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Metaphor isn't just decorative language. If it were, it wouldn't scare us so much. . . . Colorful language threatens some people, who associate it, I think, with a kind of eroticism (playing with language in public = playing with yourself), and with extra expense (having to sense or feel more). I don't share that opinion. Why reduce life to a monotone? Is that truer to the experience of being alive? I don't think so. It robs us of life's many textures. Language provides an abundance of words to keep us company on our travels. But we're losing words at a reckless pace, the national vocabulary is shrinking. Most Americans use only several hundred words or so. Frugality has its place, but not in the larder of language. We rely on words to help us detail how we feel, what we once felt, what we can feel. When the blood drains out of language, one's experience of life weakens and grows pale. It's not simply a dumbing down, but a numbing.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Diane Ackerman

After all, coffee is bitter, a flavor from the forbidden and dangerous realm.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Diane Ackerman

For better or worse, zoos are how most people come to know big or exotic animals. Few will ever see wild penguins sledding downhill to sea on their bellies, giant pandas holding bamboo lollipops in China or tree porcupines in the Canadian Rockies, balled up like giant pine cones.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Invisible prose only!" rules out the sparkling style of [writers]. . . For [whom] vivid prose, and the visionary mind it evinces, rich with speculation, insight, and subjectivity, is the craft and offers a unique caliber of truth. Is there any other art form one would praise by saying it's "invisible"? By definition, art transcends the ordinary, calls attention to itself, and offers virtuosity as its calling card. One that makes it possible to do what metaphor does so well: illuminate what can't be wholly understood.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Words are small shapes in the gorgeous chaos of the world.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Diane Ackerman

We're losing biodiversity globally at an alarming rate, and we need a cornucopia of different plants and animals, for the planet's health and our own.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Diane Ackerman

I was moving in a narrow range between busy distractedness and a pervasive sadness whose granules seemed to enter each cell, weighing it down... I ghosted between islands of anxiety... a fatigue that dulled my zest, decanted it. Sorrow felt like a marble coat I couldn’t shed.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Diane Ackerman

I'm certainly not opposed to digital technology, whose graces I daily enjoy and rely on in so many ways. But I worry about our virtual blinders.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Diane Ackerman

Shaped a little like a loaf of French country bread, our brain is a crowded chemistry lab, bustling with nonstop neural conversations.Imagine the brain, that shiny mound of being, that mouse-gray parliament of cells, that dream factory, that petit tyrant inside a ball of bone, that huddle of neurons calling all the plays, that little everywhere, that fickle pleasuredome, that wrinkled wardrobe of selves stuffed into the skull like too many clothes into a gym bag.