Best 414 of Climate change quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 17 Sep

Steven Pinker

One response to the prospect of climate change is to deny that it is occurring or that human activity is the cause. It's completely appropriate of course to challenge the hypothesis of anthropogenic climate change on scientific grounds, particularly given the extreme measures it calls for if it is true. The great virtue of science is that a true hypothesis will in the long run withstand attempts to falsify it. Anthropogenic climate change is the most vigorously challenged scientific hypothesis in history. By now, all the major challenges such as that global temperatures have stopped rising, that they only seem to be rising because they were only measured in urban heat islands, or that they really are rising, but only because the sun is getting hotter, have been refuted, and even many skeptics have been convinced. A recent survey found that exactly 4 out of 69,406 authors of peer reviewed articles in the scientific literature rejected the hypothesis of anthropogenic global warming. And that the peer reviewed literature contains no convincing evidence against the hypothesis. Nonetheless, a movement within the American political right, heavily underwritten by fossil fuel interests, has prosecuted a fanatical and mendacious campaign to deny that greenhouse gases are harming the planet. In doing so, they have advanced the conspiracy theory that the scientific community is fatally infected with political correctness and ideologically committed to a government takeover of the economy. As someone who considers himself something of a watchdog for politically correct dogma in academia, I can state that this is nonsense. Physical scientists have no such agenda and the evidence speaks for itself. And it's precisely because of challenges like this that scholars in all fields have a duty to secure the credibility of the academy by not enforcing political orthodoxies.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Peter Singer

We have no obligation to assist countries whose governments have policies that will undermine the effectiveness of our aid.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Mark Helprin

Then, just at the peak of complacency, when it was assumed that the climate of the world had changed forever, when the conductor of the philharmonic played Vivaldi’s Four Seasons and left out an entire movement, and when to children of a young age stories of winter were told as if they were fairy tales, New York was hit by a cataclysmic freeze, and, once again, people huddled together to talk fearfully of the millennium.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Sol Luckman

global warming: (n.) result of excessive hot-air emissions by climate scientists.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alfred W. Crosby

Nature's standard operating procedure, pairing a population explosion with a population crash.

By Anonym 18 Sep

William Macaskill

Over your lifetime, your individual greenhouse gas contribution will only increase the temperature of the planet by about a half a billionth of a degree Celsius. That, you might think, is such a small difference as to be negligible, so you shouldn't bother trying to reduce your personal emissions. This reasoning, however, doesn't consider expected value. It's true that increasing the planet's temperature by half a billionth of a degree probably won't make a difference to anyone, but sometimes it will make a difference, and when it does, the difference will be very large. Occasionally , that increase of half a billionth of a degree will cause a flood or a heatwave that wouldn't have happened otherwise. In which case the expected harm of raising global temperatures by half a billionth of a degree would be fairly great. We know that something like this has to be the case because we know that, if millions of people emit greenhouse gases, the bad effects are very large, and millions of people emitting greenhouse gases is just the sum of millions of individual actions.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Ned Hayes

I watched water dripping off the ferns and the needles of the Western Red Cedar next door. I watched it running in runnels down the bark of the Cherry tree, and I looked at the small droplets of misty water that were accumulating on the broad leaves of the Bigleaf Maple.I touched one of the accumulated droplets, and instantly it was gone.

By Anonym 15 Sep

David Wallace-wells

A state of half-ignorance and half-indifference is a much more pervasive climate sickness than true denial or true fatalism.

By Anonym 14 Sep

David Goodstein

No matter what else happens, this is the century in which we must learn to live without fossil fuel.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Naomi Klein

we are left with a stark choice: allow climate disruption to change everything about our world, or change pretty much everything about our economy to avoid that fate. But we need to be very clear: because of our decades of collective denial, no gradual, incremental options are now available to us. ”(…) That’s tough for a lot of people in important positions to accept, since it challenges something that might be even more powerful than capitalism, and that is the fetish of centrism—of reasonableness, seriousness, splitting the difference, and generally not getting overly excited about anything. This is the habit of thought that truly rules our era, far more among the liberals who concern themselves with matters of climate policy than among conservatives, many of whom simply deny the existence of the crisis. Climate change presents a profound challenge to this cautious centrism because half measures won’t cut it. (…) The challenge, then, is not simply that we need to spend a lot of money and change a lot of policies; it’s that we need to think differently, radically differently, for those changes to be remotely possible. Right now, the triumph of market logic, with its ethos of domination and fierce competition, is paralyzing almost all serious efforts to respond to climate change. (…) It seems to me that our problem has a lot less to do with the mechanics of solar power than the politics of human power—specifically whether there can be a shift in who wields it, a shift away from corporations and toward communities,

By Anonym 19 Sep

Guy R. Mcpherson

there's no money in extinction

By Anonym 18 Sep

Brian Fagan

The Gulf Stream is part of a vast global conveyor belt of moving water that has the power to change climate and alter human lives.... The Atlantic conveyor system has power equivalent to one hundred Amazon Rivers and is one of the great drivers of global climate.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Al Gore

This is by far the most serious crisis civilisation has ever faced.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Diwali is a festival of light and hope, not of pollution and death.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Tony Abbott

Climate change is crap.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Ned Hayes

Many people think trees grow so big from soil and water, but this is not true. Trees get their mass from the air. They gobble up airborne carbon dioxide and perform an act of chemical fission by using the energy from sunshine... Essentially, trees are made of air and sunshine.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Coleman

It is the greatest scam in history. I am amazed, appalled and highly offended by it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Bill Mckibben

When you are in a hole, stop digging!

By Anonym 19 Sep

Oliver Markus Malloy

The problem with Trump voters is, they're so dumb, they don't even know how much stuff they don't know. They just assume no one else knows more about evolution or global warming than they do.

By Anonym 17 Sep

William T. Vollmann

Once again I choose to quote the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (If somebody were to ask why I believe that organization instead of one that made opposing claims, I suppose I would say: About scientific matters a scientist is more credible than a non-scientist. A large panel of peer-reviewed scientists, expressing a common judgment, with the caveats and qualifications denoting honesty, increases this credibility from the beginning, while I start by distrusting a lobbyist who was paid to say a certain thing. Scientists may be as corruptible as anybody else, but why was it that the regulated community, with all the money at its disposal, found so few individuals in lab coats who would oppose the climate change Cassandras?—To which a true believer could always say: "I don't care about that, Bill. I rest easy. You'll see how wonderful it will be once God steps in.")

By Anonym 19 Sep

Richard Powers

Trees know when we are close by. The chemistry of their roots and the perfumes of their leaves pump out change when we're near...when you feel good after a walk in the woods, it may be that certain species are bribing you

By Anonym 16 Sep

Alastair Agutter

For a more knowing and informed world, we are becoming forever more complicit based on the evidence presented to us, regarding the demise of our Earth we all know as home.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Peter Singer

What we are doing to strangers in other communities right now is, therefore, far more serious and far more widespread than the harm we would do if we were in the habit of occasionally sending out a group of warriors to rape and pillage a village or two. Yet causing imperceptible harm at a distance by the release of waste gases is a completely new form of harm, and so we lack any kind of instinctive inhibitions or emotional response against causing it. We have trouble seeing it as harm at all.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Joseph D'lacey

The Earth was not dead. She had been sick, yes, weakened by an infestation. Now she was ridding herself of it. For those who remained alive the choice was a simple one, whether they realised it yet or not: Work with the land-- respect it and give back to it-- or die.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Mayra Mejia

We all deserve a love as deep as the oceans. Let us keep our oceans clean and enjoyable for us all.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Peter Singer

Climate change is already causing, every week, as many deaths as occurred in the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Grace Lee Boggs

The physical threat posed by climate change represents a crisis that is not only material but also profoundly spiritual at its core because it challenges us to think seriously about the future of the human race and what it means to be a human being.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Angela Merkel

It's not five minutes to midnight. It's five minutes after midnight.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Bill Maher

I'm always amazed at the human capacity to not make fundamental changes, but instead merely adapt. I see these pictures of people in Beijing and New Delhi, walking around with masks on, because you can't walk outside your house and breathe? If you can't breathe?…If that's not the cue to make a fundamental change, I don't know what is!

By Anonym 19 Sep

Graham Hancock

This ability to zoom in at very high resolution on a time window just 21 years wide and almost 13,000 years in the past comes to us courtesy of an amazing scientific resource consisting of ice cores from Greenland. Extracted with tubular drills that can reach depths of more than 3 kilometers, these cores preserve an unbroken 100,000-year record of any environmental and climatic events anywhere around the globe that affected the Greenland ice cap. What they show, and what Allen is referring to, is a mysterious spike in the metallic element platinum--'a 21-year interval with elevated platinum,' as he puts it now--'so we know that was the length of the impact event because there's very little way, once platinum falls on the ice sheet, that it can move around. It's pretty well locked in place.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Peter Singer

We have an obligation to help those in absolute poverty that is no less strong than our obligation to rescue a drowning child from a pond.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Colin Beavan

The senior British economic thinker on climate, Sir Nicholas Stern, has estimated that if we don't reverse climate change, the costs of dealing with the resulting catastrophe would be as much as twenty percent of the world's Gross Domestic Product. He's saying that if we do nothing about climate change, then we will have to spend a full fifth of our planet's economic energy on dealing with the floods, hurricanes, droughts, food shortages, and epidemics that will result.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ban Ki-moon

A deal must include an equitable global governance structure. All countries must have a voice in how resources are deployed and managed.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jeffrey A. White

In the end, it’s fear, greed and stupidity that will destroy us.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Madhav Datt

When I was in third grade, we had a mandatory environmental science class. The only thing I remember from that class, was when our teacher told us, 8 year olds, that in the state of Haryana in India - where I grew up - the water table was falling by almost 2 feet every year. For me, this fact suddenly converted this abstract idea of sustainable development into a very real problem that affected communities and people I knew.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Rush Limbaugh

Global warming, climate change, it's a total.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Nicholas D. Kristof

Isn't it time to talk not only about weather, but also about climate?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

As the planet gets warmer, we are going to have more intense and frequent heat waves, which would in turn increase the rate of death from illnesses as well, like heart attack, heat stroke, organ failure, and others.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Michael E. Mann

The science that we are doing is a threat to the world’s most powerful and wealthiest special interests. The most powerful and wealthiest special interest that has ever existed: the fossil fuel industry. They have used their immense resources to create fake scandals and to fund a global disinformation campaign aimed at vilifying the scientists, discrediting the science, and misleading the public and policymakers. Arguably, it is the most villainous act in the history of human civilisation, because it is about the short-term interests of a small number of plutocrats over the long-term welfare of this planet and the people who live on it.

By Anonym 18 Sep

David Wallace-wells

So that we are always coming to terms with what is just ahead of us, decrying what lies beyond that, and forgetting all that we had ever said about the absolute moral unacceptability of the conditions of the world we are passing through in the present tense, and blithely.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Mohith Agadi

Environment isn't asking us to conserve her for her but for our future generations.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Paul Hawken

If you look at the science that describes what is happening on earth today and aren't pessimistic, you don't have the correct data. If you meet people in this unnamed movement and aren't optimistic, you haven't got a heart.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mark Lynas

Human releases of carbon dioxide are almost certainly happening faster than any natural carbon release since the beginning of life on Earth.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Carolyn Baker

I invite the reader to consider the possibility that we are now entering a period of hospice for ourselves and with one another. Never before in human history or in our own personal history has our full embodiment, the healing of the mind-body split, been as urgent as it is in this moment. Never before have we so desperately needed to reflect upon our lives and find meaning in them as we do now.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Mehmet Murat Ildan

The message snow gives us is very valuable: The environment you live in can suddenly change! Are you ready for this? Let us be thankful to the snow for this spectacular warning!

By Anonym 19 Sep

Naomi Klein

what should we do with this fear that comes from living on a planet that is dying, made less alive every day? First, accept that it won’t go away. That it is a fully rational response to the unbearable reality that we are living in a dying world, a world that a great many of us are helping to kill, by doing things like making tea and driving to the grocery store and yes, okay, having kids. Next, use it. Fear is a survival response. Fear makes us run, it makes us leap, it can make us act superhuman. But we need somewhere to run to. Without that, the fear is only paralyzing

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Hansen

How long have we got? We have to stabilize emissions of carbon dioxide within a decade, or temperatures will warm by more than one degree... We don't have much time left.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Courtney Praski

Global climate change, over-consumption of natural resources, terror-fueled wars that led to xenophobia—these were our ancestors’ mistakes. Nations were starving to death, and people were being massacred in the thousands by radicals, and do you know what the other nations did? They did nothing. The second they stopped caring for each other is when they sealed their fate. They closed their borders. Instead of trying to save, they instead sought to preserve what they had left. This forced nations to invade in order to survive, and nuclear weapons no longer became a deterrent but a catalyst, ultimately creating a war that ended their world.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Physicist Freeman Dyson

The warming effect of carbon dioxide is strongest where the air is cold and dry; mainly in the arctic rather than in the tropics; mainly in winter rather than in summer, and mainly at night rather than in daytime. The warming is real, but it is mostly making cold places warmer rather than making hot places hotter. To represent this local warming by a global average is grossly misleading.