Best 136 of Japanese quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 16 Sep

Yoko Kamio

Ichigo Ichie --Nishikado Soujiroh

By Anonym 18 Sep

Inazo Nitobe

Read Hearn, the most eloquent and truthful interpreter of the Japanese mind, and you see the working of that mind to be an example of the working of Bushido.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Alan Brown

You know Americans...Self-improvement. No matter who or what we are, we're always working on ways to become somebody else.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Yasunari Kawabata

Be quick as another may be waiting

By Anonym 15 Sep

Peter Hanami

As there is no official textbook or guide for the JLPT N3 level this study guide has been created to help fill an information gap

By Anonym 16 Sep

Haruki Murakami

I was living for one thing only, and that was to confirm my own lack of feeling.

By Anonym 16 Sep

James Patterson

Itsumademo ai shiteru, Yuki. I love you forever, my daughter.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Matthew Amster-burton

Fish at breakfast is sometimes himono (semi-dried fish, intensely flavored and chewy, the Japanese equivalent of a breakfast of kippered herring or smoked salmon) and sometimes a small fillet of rich, well-salted broiled fish. Japanese cooks are expert at cutting and preparing fish with nothing but salt and high heat to produce deep flavor and a variety of textures: a little crispy over here, melting and juicy there. Some of this is technique and some is the result of a turbo-charged supply chain that scoops small, flavorful fish out of the ocean and deposits them on breakfast tables with only the briefest pause at Tsukiji fish market and a salt cure in the kitchen. By now, I've finished my fish and am drinking miso soup. Where you find a bowl of rice, miso shiru is likely lurking somewhere nearby. It is most often just like the soup you've had at the beginning of a sushi meal in the West, with wakame seaweed and bits of tofu, but Iris and I were always excited when our soup bowls were filled with the shells of tiny shijimi clams. Clams and miso are one of those predestined culinary combos- what clams and chorizo are to Spain, clams and miso are to Japan. Shijimi clams are fingernail-sized, and they are eaten for the briny essence they release into the broth, not for what Mario Batali has called "the little bit of snot" in the shell. Miso-clam broth is among the most complex soup bases you'll ever taste, but it comes together in minutes, not the hours of simmering and skimming involved in making European stocks. As Tadashi Ono and Harris Salat explain in their book Japanese Hot Pots, this is because so many fermented Japanese ingredients are, in a sense, already "cooked" through beneficial bacterial and fungal actions. Japanese food has a reputation for crossing the line from subtlety into blandness, but a good miso-clam soup is an umami bomb that begins with dashi made from kombu (kelp) and katsuobushi (bonito flakes) or niboshi (a school of tiny dried sardines), adds rich miso pressed through a strainer for smoothness, and is then enriched with the salty clam essence.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Peter Hanami

In the Asian century, long term business relationships will begin with a good cultural understanding

By Anonym 16 Sep

Timothy S. George

In retrospect, these events are discouraging: too many scientists seem to have been in the service of money and power. Too many in the media saw it as their duty to be "neutral" by uncritically reporting every theory, rather than investigating who sponsored them and whether they were backed by solid evidence. Too many government officials seem to have been willing to sacrifice poor fisherfolk on the altar of high growth.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Peter Hanami

The analysis provides a clear difference between the age and gender of Japanese students in Australia. The difficult management question is “what do these numbers mean”?

By Anonym 17 Sep

Masashi Kishimoto

Once you question your own belief, it's over." -Naruto Uzumaki

By Anonym 17 Sep

Soman Gouda

many took the leap with the frog, only to become Basho's ignoring the frog and the pond

By Anonym 19 Sep

Peter Hanami

The purpose of the research was to better understand all the stages Japanese international students encounter when studying abroad and to better ascertain their buyer behaviour when selecting foreign education

By Anonym 18 Sep

Susan Cain

Other studies have also found unusual levels of persistence in even very young Asian children. For example, the cross-cultural psychologist Priscilla Blinco gave Japanese and American first graders an unsolvable puzzle to work on in solitude, without the help of other children or a teacher, and compared how long they tried before giving up. The Japanese children spent an average of 13.93 minutes on the puzzle before calling it quits, whereas the American kids spent only 9.47 minutes. Fewer than 27 percent of the American students persisted as long as the average Japanese student — and only 10 percent of the Japanese students gave up as quickly as the average American. Blinco attributes these results to the Japanese quality of persistence.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Banana Yoshimoto

Everything in my life revolves around people playing at being something.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dave Barry

I like the relaxed way in which the Japanese approach religion. I think of myself as basically a moral person, but I'm definitely not religious, and I'm very tired of the preachiness and obsession with other people's behavior characteristic of many religious people in the United States. As far as I could tell, there's nothing preachy about Buddhism. I was in a lot of temples, and I still don't know what Buddhists believe, except that at one point Kunio said 'If you do bad things, you will be reborn as an ox.' This makes as much sense to me as anything I ever heard from, for example, the Reverend Pat Robertson.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Yasushi Inoue

Weißt Du, daß es außer den über dreißig Farben in einem Farbtub-Kasten noch eine weitere, für Menschenaugen sehr wohl sichtbare Farbe gibt — die der Traurigkeit?

By Anonym 19 Sep

Sadami Yamada

To appreciate the best opportunity for attack and defence, you must fully understand the rhythm of movement. (Page 28).

By Anonym 15 Sep

Hideyuki Kurata

...and where shall we go from here? The Library is vast and infinite.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Sarah Ruhl

There’s a word in Japanese for being sad in the springtime – a whole word for just being sad – about how pretty the flowers are and how soon they’re going to die.” — Sarah Ruhl

By Anonym 15 Sep

Yasunari Kawabata

But even more than her diary, Shimamura was surprised at her statement that she had carefully cataloged every novel and short story she had read since she was fifteen or sixteen. The record already filled ten notebooks. "You write down your criticisms, do you?" "I could never do anything like that. I just write down the author and the characters and how they are related to each other. That is about all." "But what good does it do?" "None at all." "A waste of effort." "A complete waste of effort," she answered brightly, as though the admission meant little to her. She gazed solemnly at Shimamura, however. A complete waste of effort. For some reason Shimamura wanted to stress the point. But, drawn to her at that moment, he felt a quiet like the voice of the rain flow over him. He knew well enough that for her it was in fact no waste of effort, but somehow the final determination that it had the effect of distilling and purifying the woman's existence.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Murakami Haruki

It was deep beyond measuring, and crammed full of darkness, as if all the world's darknesses had been boiled down to their ultimate density.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Peter Hanami

For those wanting a better understanding of Japan and Japanese culture, this is a good visual reference

By Anonym 18 Sep

Yukio Mishima

The law is an accumulation of tireless attempts to block a man's desire to change life into an instant of poetry. Certainly it would not be right to let everybody exchange his life for a line of poetry written with a splash of blood. But the mass of men, lacking valor, pass away their lives without ever feeling the least touch of such a desire.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Natsuki Takaya

Those who hurt others will also hurt themselves.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Yukio Mishima

Might it have been nothing but life itself? Life; this limitless complex sea, filled with assorted flotsam, brimming with capricious, violent, and yet eternally transparent blues and greens.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Joy Kogawa

In a time like this, let us trust in God even more. To trust when life is easy is no trust.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Ruth Ozeki

Otaku (おた) is also a formal way of saying "you". た means "house", and with the honorific お, it literally means "your honorable house", implying that you are less of a person and more of a place, fixed in space and contained under a roof. Makes sense that the stereotype of the modern otaku is a shut-in, an obsessed loner and social isolate who rarely leaves his house.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Shan Sa

I have been brought up in a world dominated by honor. I have known neither crime, poverty, nor betrayal, and here I taste hatred for the first time: it is sublime, like a thirst for justice and revenge." -the girl who played go

By Anonym 15 Sep

Sadami Yamada

[...] before you can control your opponent's body you must first control his mind. (Page 17).

By Anonym 17 Sep

Sen No Rikyu

Miekkani nostan, tämän miekan niin kauan omistamani: on vihdoinkin aika se singota taivasta päin.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Haruki Murakami

Not that we were incompatible: we just had nothing to talk about.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Stacey Anne Baterina Salinas

The various units of Philippine guerrillas, their tactics, military resources, and vigor to survive and end the Japanese maltreatment of the Philippine people paint the Pacific Theater from 1941-1945 as desperate, dark, and bloody for Asian communities throughout East and Southeast Asia

By Anonym 19 Sep

Soman Gouda

they make love in the sculptures on a temple wall

By Anonym 18 Sep

Ruth Ozeki

Ruth was a novelist, and novelists, Oliver asserted, should have cats and books.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Neil Nakadate

Most white Americans were willing to sacrifice civil liberties in the name of national security as long as they were the civil liberties of someone else.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Zita Steele

At this place in time, neither of them were foreign to each other. They were just two humans alone in the middle of the sky. The differences between them now were immaterial, like the faint whisper of traffic far below.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Minae Mizumura

This may sound like a terrible generalization but the Japanese language has taught me that a person's understanding of the world need not be so well articulated -- so rationally articulated -- the way it tends to be in Western languages. The Japanese language has the full potential to be logical and analytical, but it seems to me that it isn't its real business to be that way. At least, not the Japanese language we still use today. You can mix the present and the past tense. You don't have to specify whether something is singular or plural. You aren't always looking for a cogent progression of sentences; conjunctions such as "but," "and," and "so" are hence not all that important. Many Japanese people used to criticize their language for inhibiting rational thought. It was quite liberating to me when I realized that we can understand the world in different ways depending on the language we use. There isn't a right way or a wrong way.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Sylvia Plath

Mrs Guinea answered my letter and invited me to lunch at her home. That was where I saw my first finger-bowl. The water had a few cherry blossoms floating in it, and I thought it must be some clear sort of Japanese after-dinner soup and ate every bit of it, including the crisp little blossoms. Mrs Guinea never said anything, and it was only much later, when I told a debutant I knew at college about dinner, that I learned what I had done.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Yukio Mishima

By means of microscopic observation and astronomical projection the lotus flower can become the foundation for an entire theory of the universe and an agent whereby we may perceive the Truth. And first we must know that each of the petals has eighty-four thousand veins and that each vein gives eighty-four thousand lights.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Peter Hanami

The study looks at the Japanese student market and aims to better understand it by concentrating on age and gender insights of the market to ascertain trends, awareness and key features that will allow marketers to appreciate and reach out to these customers

By Anonym 15 Sep

Yoshida Kenko

After all, things thought but left unsaid only fester inside you.

By Anonym 17 Sep

N. M. Kelby

No kitchen is complete without veal stock." "Do you have veal stock in this kitchen? Does your neighbor?" "It is the foundation of all sauces. It adds a complexity. Deliciousness. Has Escoffier not told you of this theory of five tastes? A Japanese chemist proved it, and called it 'umami,' which means deliciousness.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Sir Laurens Van Der Post

[The] Japanese were a people in a profound, inverse, reverse, or if I preferred it, even perverse sense, more in love with death than living.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Shizuko Go

These days, even plain tea has become a treat, hasn't it?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Yoko Hasegawa

5.6.2. Egocentricity "The linguistic phenomenon of evidentiality reflects a strong awareness of the self in Japanese language usage, however primordial and simplistic such a notion may be. In order to use the language appropriately, the speaker needs to be aware of the distinction between self and all others. This fact runs counter to many researchers in anthropology, linguistics, and sociology who contend that the Japanese people lack the concept of the individualistic self akin to the Western notion of self. Some even insist that Japan is a "selfless" society. Actual observation of Japanese society clearly demonstrates these notions to be myths. Quite the contrary, Japanese is a highly egocentric language, in which the presence of "I" as the speaker is so obvious as to not have to be expressed overtly.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Murasaki Shikibu

To be pleasant, gentle, calm and self-possessed: this is the basis of good taste and charm in a woman. No matter how amorous or passionate you may be, as long as you are straightforward and refrain from causing others embarrassment, no one will mind. But women who are too vain and act pretentiously, to the extent that they make others feel uncomfortable, will themselves become the object of attention; and once that happens, people will find fault with whatever they say or do; whether it be how they enter a room, how they sit down, how they stand up or how they take their leave. Those who end up contradicting themselves and those who disparage their companions are also carefully watched and listened to all the more. As long as you are free from such faults, people will surely refrain from listening to tittle-tattle and will want to show you sympathy, if only for the sake of politeness. I am of the opinion that when you intentionally cause hurt to another, or indeed if you do ill through mere thoughtless behavior, you fully deserve to be censured in public. Some people are so good-natured that they can still care for those who despise them, but I myself find it very difficult. Did the Buddha himself in all his compassion ever preach that one should simply ignore those who slander the Three Treasures? How in this sullied world of ours can those who are hard done by be expected to reciprocate in kind?

By Anonym 18 Sep

Victoria Abbott Riccardi

Strangely enough, the Japanese base most of their traditional desserts on beans. Called an, this smooth chocolatey-looking paste is made from azuki beans boiled in sugar and water. I encountered it for the first time one afternoon when I helped myself to a traditional Kyoto sweet resembling a triangular ravioli stuffed with fudge. What a shock to find a center made from azuki beans, instead of cocoa beans! Sometimes sweet makers choose chestnuts or white kidney beans to make the an, which they craft into dainty flowers, leaves, and fruits that look just like marzipan. Using special tools and food coloring, they fashion such masterpieces as prickly green-jacketed chestnuts with dark brown centers, winter white camellias with red stamens, and pale pink cherry blossoms with mint-colored leaves to commemorate the flower's arrival in April. The bean fudge also fills and frosts other confections, including pounded glutinous rice taffy called mochi and bite-size cakes, made from flour, water, and eggs that are baked until golden. These moist confections go by the name of namagashi and are always served before the thick whipped green tea at the tea ceremony.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Haruki Murakami

Allowing ourselves to become pure point of view, we hang in midair over the city. What we see now is a gigantic metropolis waking up. Commuter trains of many colors move in all directions, transporting people from place to place. Each of those under transport is a human being with a different face and mind, and at the same time each is a nameless part of the collective identity. Each is simultaneously a self-contained whole and a mere part. Handling this dualism of theirs skillfully and advantageously, they perform their morning rituals with deftness and precision: brushing teeth, shaving, tying neckties, applying lipstick. They check the morning news on TV, exchange words with their families, eat, defecate.