Best 25 of Karen Arnold quotes - MyQuotes

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Karen Arnold
By Anonym 15 Sep

Karen Arnold

As a group, valedictorians have always led well-rounded, socially integrated, ‘normal’ lives.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Karen Arnold

One of the problems with having time to read all that you want is that your interests become so eclectic it's hard to focus.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Karen Arnold

For academically talented women, in contrast, school success does not guarantee occupational success. Even the best female college students need people who will support them, encourage them, and – most important—who will connect them to opportunities.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Karen Arnold

College bonds weakened for students of who lived off campus, took outside employment, and maintained active family commitments. Unskilled in navigating the university, these students were unlikely to enter the personal networks where insiders traded the practical information they desperately needed.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Karen Arnold

From kindergarten to the valedictory address, schools grade, rank, and label their best performers. The top high school student wins the first major life contest, a competition in which most members of society participate. Following high school, victors enter subsequent contests at an advantage. The race is never restarted.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Karen Arnold

Outstanding students of color arrived on campus without the web of white middle-class family and school structures that provided Anglo students with practical knowledge in such areas as college choice strategies and career planning.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Karen Arnold

In their early thirties, the most career-invested women and men in the Illinois Valedictorian Project are those who have found deep personal meaning in vocations. Those qualities and conditions that keep students centered on work are different than those that made them high school valedictorian.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Karen Arnold

Valedictorians were highly motivated to excel academically because of early family and school experiences.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Karen Arnold

Higher education, in contrast, did not always keep its promise to develop the talents of even its best students. Left with classroom achievement alone, many students never found a negotiable path to a clearly envisioned career corresponding to their deepest interests and values.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Karen Arnold

As valedictorians matured from high school they began to change their views of success from stereotypical ideals such as material wealth or emulating their parents’ lifestyle to an idea created on their own. They now sought balance between money, career and family as opposed to, say, only wealth. Academically and careerwise most of them were traditionally successful.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Karen Arnold

Are schools rewarding the right people as the highest achievers? If the goal is hard-working, productive, adaptable adults, then U.S. high schools are recognizing precisely the correct group.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Karen Arnold

The stories of successful channels, stifling ruts, and missed paths all point to the same conclusion: the successful passage from school to postschool achievement requires an interpersonal process of increasing self-understanding, career socialization, and tacit knowledge.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Karen Arnold

To reach the head of the class, students needed to conform to the school system and work equally hard at all subjects.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Karen Arnold

For all students, a network of career exploration opportunities, sponsors, and mentors is a critical accompaniment to coursework.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Karen Arnold

Academically capable men and women almost never follow a single-minded interest from childhood into careers.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Karen Arnold

The happiest have found adult achievement arenas that do engage them, occasionally through the luck of good early choices, sometimes by leaving worn paths, and most often through exploring themselves and careers with the help of guides and sponsors.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Karen Arnold

Female valedictorians marry a little later and participate somewhat more heavily in paid work than women in their age group nationally.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Karen Arnold

To be number one is to be publicly labeled a winner in the system that counts – a system of advancement through personal merit and effort in rugged competition. Labels of success – Rhodes scholar, Nobel laureate, Heisman Trophy winner – follow a person through life and define him or her to the public. One such label, valedictorian, marks academic winners. Schools in the United States have at least one common belief: high academic achievement is a good thing.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Karen Arnold

Are valedictorians successful a decade and a half after high school? Yes is the simple answer to this straightforward question…Yet the answer becomes infinitely less simple when we examine what society and the valedictorians themselves mean by “success.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Karen Arnold

The record is clear; nothing succeeds like success and there is no predictor of academic success better than a history of academic success.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Karen Arnold

For minority students, as for women and working-class white valedictorians, superior college grades did not lead smoothly to high-level satisfying work.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Karen Arnold

That is, ability, values, opportunities, gender, culture, and social class all affect the aspirations and achievements of academically talented students. So does chance.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Karen Arnold

Male valedictorians attended Harvard, Yale, Princeton, MIT, and Stanford. Only one woman chose an Ivy League university-Cornell.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Karen Arnold

Women—and only women—lowered their intellectual self-esteem between high school graduation and sophomore year of college.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Karen Arnold

Extremely talented students face an odd danger: they do so well in the paths they choose that they might not question whether the direction really fits them.