Best 149 of Political science quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 16 Sep

Victoria Stoklasa

If you have the right to influence the laws that are made in your community, why not take the opportunity to do something good?

By Anonym 18 Sep

Amit Kalantri

Politics should be for people, politics shouldn't be for politicians.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Bangambiki Habyarimana

What some politicians really mean when they say this country: me, my party, my ethnic group international justice is biased: they want to arrest me terrorists: opposition illegal immigrants: refugees elections: remaining in power peace: eliminating the opposition international community: the rich countries the people: sympathisers of my party

By Anonym 16 Sep

Livy

In ancient Greece more than one royal house was guilty of crime which became the stuff of tragedy: now Rome was to follow the same path - but not in vain; for that very guilt was to hasten the coming of liberty and the hatred of kings, and to ensure that the throne it won should never again be occupied.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Daron Acemoglu

...poor countries are poor because those who have power make choices that create poverty. They get it wrong not by mistake or ignorance but on purpose. To understand this, you have to go beyond economics and expert advice on the best thing to do and, instead, study how decisions actually get made, who gets to make them, and why those people decide to do what they do.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

If your spouse gets sick, who would you visit - your non-doctor neighbor or an actual doctor! Any sane person would visit a doctor over a non-doctor neighbor, even if that neighbor happens to be a celebrity, because it is common knowledge that fame or charisma is not equivalent to medical expertise, yet when it comes to choosing a doctor to treat the sickness of a nation, the masses most proudly elect any charismatic chimpanzee over a humble, wise and conscientious leader.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Federico Cartelli

Ogni frammento di libertà consegnato nelle mani dello Stato rischia d'essere perduto per sempre; come una nuova tassa, che una volta introdotta non viene mai più tolta.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ernest Agyemang Yeboah

A sure way a country can develop is through a true development of the masses. Yes! A sure way to ensure a true freedom of the people is for the people take up their own destiny into their hands and bond their strengths to positively dare with a clear vision and fortitude like the eagle for a great change in wisdom and in peace, devoid of rebellious motive, massacre and nepotism, and with tenacity, direct the thought, policy and inspiration of the few people who rule the masses for the best change ever! Until this is done, the masses shall always cry out of ignorance, not knowing the real power within them and beg at the feet of the few people for how they should live their lives!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Amit Kalantri

Business is boss, politics is servant.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Charles A. Lave

God has chosen to give the easy problems to the physicists.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jeffrey A. Miller

Both groups [of pundits] were critics, and that is the heart of the problem. If you are a pundit, you seem so smart when you are telling the President what he did wrong… This [is] mostly BS.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Maximilien De Robespierre

War is always the first object of a powerful government which wishes to increase its power. I shall not speak to you of the opportunity that a war affords for a government to exhaust the people and to dissipate its treasure and to cover with an impenetrable veil its depredations and its errors . . . It is in time of war that the executive power displays the most redoubtable energy and that it wields a sort of dictatorship most ominous to a nascent liberty . . . [trans. G. Rudé; pg. 33].

By Anonym 17 Sep

Alfred Cobban

Mostly what is called political science seems to me a device, invented by university teachers, for avoiding that dangerous subject politics, without achieving science.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Mike Bhangu

My beliefs and my wants are not the same as popular thought—those built inside the box. Mine, built and born outside, are known to throw uppercuts.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Even an orange orangutan can win an election with the power of popularity if it exudes enough charisma, but that doesn't make him a conscientious leader of a people.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Kevin Alan Lee

...the freedom to bear arms may be righteously rejected to encourage the preservation of all corporeal forms of life.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

True progressive, non-conflicted, peaceful, peace-making and sane government is only possible, when the majority is non-conflicted, peaceful and sane.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Amit Kalantri

Politics doesn’t mean playing deceitful and trickery games against the people, it means playing resourceful and organized games for the people.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Mamur Mustapha

Politics is an alternative to war and if you're in it, you live it as such. You win some & you lose at times.

By Anonym 19 Sep

John Peter Nettl

There is no tragedy without commitment; no negation even, without it.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Steven Magee

The Democratic Party would like to be re-elected so that they can continue to uphold almost no Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) whistle-blower complaints, enforce hardly any police internal affairs allegations, and corrupt corporations with lobbyists can continue operating outside of the law.

By Anonym 18 Sep

John Peter Nettl

Personal dislike as a political end to itself was alien to her; one should not attack people in public except as for political purposes. To this extent, her attitude was the exact opposite of her German colleagues' who deplored personal politics in public, but respected personal dislike.

By Anonym 16 Sep

John Peter Nettl

If they had kept quiet, and lain low for a time, things might have fizzled out as another unreal Wortstreist, blown up by a few ambitious authors of the party press. As it was, they decided to counter-attack the noisy, irrepressible outsiders--foreigners, to boot--and so forced a reluctant leadership to turn its full, slow, wrath against them; and against Bernstein too. For the most practical manifestation of revisionism was indiscipline and disobedience, a door opened to centrifugal forces of bourgeois influence.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Steven Magee

Politics, it's all corrupt!

By Anonym 16 Sep

Robert David Steele

Integrity, in my view, starts with the individual human being and grows in a compounded manner from there. The citizen must be an 'intelligence minuteman.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Robert Kagan

International order is not an evolution; it is an imposition. It is the domination of one vision over others- in this case, the domination of liberal principles of economics, domestic politics, and international relations over other, nonliberal principles. It will last only as long as those who imposed it retain the capacity to defend it.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Niall Ferguson

The aim of Cold War competition in the third world was not to win a contest between rival models of economic development but above all to "fill(...) a spiritual void," for "even Communism has made many more converts through the theological quality of Marxism than through the materialistic aspect on which it prides itself.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Mike Bhangu

Held by a thread, hung from the heavens, companion to the winds, and swayed by the mandarins of time.

By Anonym 18 Sep

John Peter Nettl

She had privacy, and the privilege of walking up and down the same battlements as the sentries.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Helen Razer

Trump is a broken toilet, and we wish the old bog plumbing problems.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Rosa Luxemburg

I know thy works, that thou are neither cold nor hot; I would that thou wert cold or hot. So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spew thee out of my mouth.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Fyodor Stepun

In any event, we must remember that it's not the blinded wrongdoers who are primarily responsible for the triumph of evil in the world, but the spiritually sighted servants of the good.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Robert David Steele

I am personally optimistic. I share the widespread view that we are entering a new epoch during which we can achieve conscious evolution and the elevation of humanity to a constructive steward of the Earth.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Livy

Now I would solicit the particular attention of those numerous people who imagine that money is everything in this world, and that rank and ability are inseparable from wealth: let them observe that Cincinnatus, the one man in whom Rome reposed all her hope of survival, was at that moment working a little three-acre farm (now known as Quinctian meadows) west of the Tiber, just opposite the spot where the shipyards are today. A mission from the city found him at work on his land - digging a ditch, maybe, or ploughing. Greetings were exchanged, and he was asked - with a prayer for God's blessing on himself and his country - to put on his toga and hear the Senate's instructions. This naturally surprised him, and, asking if all were well, he told his wife Racilia to run to their cottage and fetch his toga. The toga was brought, and wiping the grimy sweat from his hands and face he put it on; at once the envoys from the city saluted him, with congratulations, as Dictator, invited him to enter Rome, and informed him of the terrible danger of Minucius's army.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Livy

The political reputation of Servius rests upon his organization of society according to a fixed scale of rank and fortune. He originated the census, a measure of the highest utility to a state destined, as Rome was, to future preeminence; for by means of its public service, in peace as well as in war, could thence forward be regularly organized on the basis of property; every man's contribution could be in proportion to his means.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Martin N. Marger

Power, it seems, is one of those terms we all understand and can explain--until asked to do so.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Robert David Steele

This lack of accurate, trustworthy information about the true cost of any given policy, product, service, or behavior is paralyzing all action.

By Anonym 19 Sep

T. E. Lawrence

There was among the tribes in the fighting zone a nervous enthusiasm common, I suppose, to all national risings, but strangely disquieting to one from a land so long delivered that national freedom had become like the water in our mouths, tasteless.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Sinclair Lewis

Is it just possible,' he sighed, 'that the most vigorous and obldest idealists have been the worst enemies of human progress instead of its greatest creators?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jefferson Smith

Boys forget what their country means by just reading 'The Land of the Free' in history books. Then they get to be men. They forget even more. Liberty’s too precious a thing to be buried in books.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Rebecca West

It had been his opinion that it might serve his country if the Chinese and his men saw that he was not afraid to die. For the comprehension of our age and the part treason has played in it, it is necessary to realize there are many English people who would have felt acutely embarrassed if they had to read aloud the story of this young man's death, or to listen to it, or comment on it in public. They would have admitted that he had shown extreme capacity for courage and self-sacrifice, and that these are admirable qualities, likely to help humanity in the struggle for survival; but at the same time he would not please them. They would have felt more at ease with many of the traitors in this book. They would have conceded that on general principles it is better not to lie, not to cheat, not to betray; but they also would feel that Water's heroism has something dowdy about it while treason has a certain style a sort of elegance, or as the vulgar would say, 'sophistication'. William Joyce would not have fallen within the scope of their preference, but the cause for that would be unconnected with his defense of the Nazi cause. The people who harbor such emotions find no difficulty in accepting French writers who collaborated with the Germans during the war. It would be Joyce's readiness to seal his fate with his life which they would have found crude and unappetizing. But Alan Nunn May, and Fuchs, Burgess, and Maclean would seem in better taste. And concerning taste there is no argument. Those who cultivate this preference, would not have been prepared to defend these men's actions if they were set down in black and white. They would have admitted that it is not right for a man to accept employment from the state on certain conditions and break that understanding, when he could have easily obtained alternative employment in which he would not have to give any such undertaking; and that it is even worse for an alien to induce a country to accept him as a citizen when he is homeless and then conspire against its safety by handing over the most lethal secret it possesses to a potential enemy of aggressive character. But, all the same, they would have felt that subtlety was on the side of the traitors, and even morality. To them the classic hero, like poor young Terence Waters, was hamming it. People who practice the virtues are judged as if they had struck the sort of false attitude which betrays an incapacity for art; while the people who practice the vices are judged as if they had shown the subtle rightness of gesture which is the sign of the born artist.

By Anonym 15 Sep

I. Vicente

Coming out on June 15 - "For the People, Time to Take Our Country Back!" Just in time for the presidential general election campaign. More details to follow as the date approaches

By Anonym 15 Sep

Aristotle

Any polis which is truly so called, and is not merely one in name, must devote itself to the end of encouraging goodness. Otherwise, political association sinks into a mere alliance.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Steven Magee

Political corruption works by having an equally corrupt legal system to protect it.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Livy

I am a Roman,' he said to the king; 'my name is Gaius Mucius. I came here to kill you - my enemy. I have as much courage to die as to kill. It is our Roman way to do and to suffer bravely. Nor am I alone in my resolve against your life; behind me is a long line of men eager for the same honor. Brace yourself, if you will, for the struggle - a struggle for your life from hour to hour, with an armed enemy always at your door. That is the war we declare against you: you need fear no action in the battlefield, army against army; it will be fought against you alone, by one of us at a time.' Porsena in rage and alarm ordered the prisoner to be burnt alive unless he at once divulged the plot thus obscurely hinted at, whereupon Mucius, crying: 'See how cheap men hold their bodies when they care only for honor!' thrust his right hand into the fire which had been kindled for a sacrifice, and let it burn there as if he were unconscious of the pain. Porsena was so astonished by the young man's almost superhuman endurance that he leapt to his feet and ordered his guards to drag him from the altar. 'Go free,' he said; 'you have dared to be a worse enemy to yourself than to me. I should bless your courage, if it lay with my country to dispose of it. But, as that cannot be, I, as an honorable enemy, grant you pardon, life, and liberty.' 'Since you respect courage,' Mucius replied, as if he were thanking him for his generosity, 'I will tell you in gratitude what you could not force from me by threats. There are three hundred of us in Rome, all young like myself, and all of noble blood, who have sworn an attempt upon your life in this fashion. It was I who drew the first lot; the rest will follow, each in his turn and time, until fortune favor us and we have got you.' The release of Mucius (who was afterwards known as Scaevola, or the Left-Handed Man, from the loss of his right hand) was quickly followed by the arrival in Rome of envoys from Porsena. The first attempt upon his life, foiled only by a lucky mistake, and the prospect of having to face the same thing again from every one of the remaining conspirators, had so shaken the king that he was coming forward with proposals for peace.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Amit Kalantri

People wishes their friends to be in politics, but their sons in professions.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

It is only when all the peoples of all countries grow together holding hands in harmony and not pointing guns at each other in hatred, that we can really advance in the path of progress as one species.

By Anonym 16 Sep

John Peter Nettl

I am determined to bring even more severity, clarity, and reserve into my life (she wrote in 1908).

By Anonym 16 Sep

Nate Silver

If political scientists couldn’t predict the downfall of the Soviet Union—perhaps the most important event in the latter half of the twentieth century—then what exactly were they good for?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Livy

At last he was to feel that he had the town, as it were, in his pocket, and was ready for anything. Accordingly he sent a confidential messenger to Rome, to ask his father what step he should next take, his power in Gabii being, by God's grace, by this time absolute. Tarquin, I suppose, was not sure of the messenger's good faith: in any case, he said not a word in reply to his question, but with a thoughtful air went out to the garden. The man followed him, and Tarquin, strolling up and down in silence, began knocking off poppy-heads with his stick. The messenger at last wearied of putting his question and waiting for the reply, so he returned to Gabii supposing his mission to have failed. He told Sextus what he had said and what he had seen his father do: the king, he declared, whether from anger, or hatred, or natural arrogance, had not uttered a single word. Sextus realized that though his father had not spoken, he had, by his action, indirectly expressed his meaning clearly enough; so he proceeded at once to act upon his murderous instructions.