Best 483 of Samuel Taylor Coleridge quotes - MyQuotes

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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

And all who heard should see them there, And all should cry, Beware! Beware! His flashing eyes, his floating hair! Weave a circle round him thrice, And close your eyes with holy dread, For he on honey-dew hath fed, And drunk the milk of Paradise.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

I never knew a trader in philanthropy who was not wrong in his head or heart somewhere or other.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Our own heart, and not other men's opinions, forms our true honor.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Health is a great blessing--competence obtained by honorable industry is a great blessing--and a great blessing it is to have kind, faithful, and loving friends and relatives; but, that the greatest of all blessings, as it is the most ennobling of all privileges, is to be indeed a Christian.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Religion is the most gentlemanly thing in the world. It alone will gentilize, if unmixed with cant.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Centres, or centre-pieces of wood, are put by builders under an arch of stone while it is in the process of construction till the keystone is put in. Just such is the use Satan makes of pleasures to construct evil habits upon; the pleasure lasts till the habit is fully formed; but that done the habit may stand eternal. The pleasures are sent for firewood, and the hell begins in this life.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Language is the armory of the human mind, and at once contains the trophies of its past and the weapons of its future conquests.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

God is everywhere! the God who framed Mankind to be one, mighty family, Himself our Father, and the world our home.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Therefore all seasons shall be sweet to thee, Whether the summer clothe the general earth With greenness, or the redbreast sit and sing Betwixt the tufts of snow on the bare branch Of mossy apple tree.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Never yet did there exist a full faith in the Divine Word (by whom light as well as immortality was brought into the world) which did not expand the intellect, while it purified the heart--which did not multiply the aims and objects of the understanding, while it fixed and simplified those of the desires and passions.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

A woman in a single state may be happy and may be miserable; but most happy, most miserable, these are epithets belonging to a wife.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Oh Sleep! it is a gentle thing, beloved from pole to pole, to Mary Queen the praise be given! She sent the gentle sleep from Heaven, that slid into my soul.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Motives are symptoms of weakness, and supplements for the deficient energy of the living principle, the law within us. Let them then be reserved for those momentous acts and duties in which the strongest and best-balanced natures must feel themselves deficient, and where humility no less than prudence prescribes deliberation.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

I must reject fluids and ethers of all kinds, magnetical, electrical, and universal, to whatever quintessential thinness they may be treble distilled, and as it were super-substantiated.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

In Koln, a town of monks and bones, And pavement fang'd with murderous stones, And rags and hags, and hideous wenches, I counted two-and-seventy stenches, All well defined, and several stinks! Ye nymphs that reign o'er sewers and sinks, The River Rhine, it is well known, Doth wash your city of Cologne; But tell me, nymphs! what power divine Shall henceforth whash the river Rhine.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Seldom can philosophic genius be more usefully employed than in thus rescuing admitted truths from the neglect caused by the very circumstance of their universal admission.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

He holds him with his glittering eye, And listens like a three years' child.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

The wise only possess ideas; the greater part of mankind are possessed by them.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Creation rather than painting, or if painting, yet such, and with such co-presence of the whole picture flash'd at once upon the eye, as the sun paints in a camera obscura. (Describing his poetic ideal, 1817)

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Stimulate the heart to love and the mind to be early accurate, and all other virtues will rise of their own accord, and all vices will be thrown out.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

To carry feelings of childhood into the powers of adulthood, to combine the child's sense of wonder and novelty with the appearances which every day for years has rendered familiar, this is the character and privilege of genius, and one of the marks which distinguish it from talent.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

What if you slept And what if In your sleep You dreamed And what if In your dream You went to heaven And there plucked a strange and beautiful flower And what if When you awoke You had that flower in you hand Ah, what then?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Truths ... are too often considered as so true, that they lose all the power of truth, and lie bed-ridden in the dormitory of the soul, side by side with the most despised and exploded errors.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

It is the duty of the Judge in criminal trials to take care that the verdict of the jury is not founded upon any evidence except that which the law allows.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Humor is consistent with pathos, whilst wit is not.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Man is distinguished from the brute animals in proportion as thought prevails over sense: but in the healthy processes of the mind, a balance is constantly maintained between the impressions from outward objects and the inward operations of the intellect:--for if there be an overbalance in the contemplative faculty, man thereby becomes the creature of mere meditation, and loses his natural power of action.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

A mother is a mother still, The holiest thing alive.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Some persons have contended that mathematics ought to be taught by making the illustrations obvious to the senses. Nothing can be more absurd or injurious: it ought to be our never-ceasing effort to make people think, not feel.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

This world has angels all too few, and heaven is overflowing.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Memory, bosom-spring of joy.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Swans sing before they die— 't were no bad thing Should certain persons die before they sing.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Mr. Lyell's system of geology is just half the truth, and no more. He affirms a great deal that is true, and he denies a great deal which is equally true; which is the general characteristic of all systems not embracing the whole truth.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

The principle of the Gothic architecture is infinity made imaginable.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

There is nothing insignificant-nothing.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Ah! well a-day! what evil looks / Had I from old and young! / Instead of the cross, the Albatross / About my neck was hung.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

The blue and bright-eyed floweret of the brook, Hope's gentle gem, the sweet Forget-me-not.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Talk of the devil, and his horns appear.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

There is in every human countenance either a history or a prophecy which must sadden, or at least soften every reflecting observer.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Shakespeare knew the human mind, and its most minute and intimate workings, and he never introduces a word, or a thought, in vain or out of place; if we do not understand him, it is our own fault.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Iambics march from short to long;-- With a leap and a bound the swift Anapaests throng

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

To leave no interval between the sentence and the fulfillment of it doth beseem God only, the Immutable!

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Method means primarily a way or path of transit. From this we are to understand that the first idea of method is a progressive transition from one step to another in any course. If in the right course, it will be the true method; if in the wrong, we cannot hope to progress.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

The moving moon went up the sky, And nowhere did abide: Softly she was going up, And a star or two beside.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Work without hope draws nectar in a sieve, And hope without an object cannot live.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

I do not call the sod under my feet my country; but language-religion-government-blood-identity in these makes men of one country.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Alas! they had been friends in youth; but whispering tongues can poison truth.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

An instinctive taste teaches men to build their churches with spire steeples which point as with a silent finger to the sky and stars.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Genius must have talent as its complement and implement, just as in like manner imagination must have fancy. In short, the higher intellectual powers can only act through a corresponding energy of the lower.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

I shall attack Chemistry, like a Shark.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Let every book-worm, when in any fragrant, scarce old tome, he discovers a sentence, a story, an illustration, that does his heart good, hasten to give it the widest circulation that newspapers and magazines, penny and halfpenny, can afford.