Best 483 of Samuel Taylor Coleridge quotes - MyQuotes

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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
By Anonym 19 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

The reader should be carried forward, not merely or chiefly by the mechanical impulse of curiosity, or by a restless desire to arrive at the final solution; but by the pleasurable activity of mind excited by the attractions of the journey itself.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Forth from his dark and lonely hiding-place, (Portentous sight!) the owlet Atheism, sailing on obscene wings athwart the noon, drops his blue-fringed lids, and holds them close, and hooting at the glorious sun in Heaven, cries out, ''Where is it?''

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Those who best know human nature will acknowledge most fully what a strength light hearted nonsense give to a hard working man

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

It is a gentle and affectionate thought, that in immeasurable height above us, at our first birth, the wreath of love was woven with sparkling stars for flowers.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Remorse weeps tears of blood.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Swans sing before they die— 't were no bad thing Should certain persons die before they sing.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

When the whole and the parts are seen at once, as mutually producing and explaining each other, as unity in multeity, there results shapeliness.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

The primary imagination I hold to be the living power and prime agent of all human perception, and as a repetition in the finite mind of the eternal act of creation in the infinite I Am.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Seldom can philosophic genius be more usefully employed than in thus rescuing admitted truths from the neglect caused by the very circumstance of their universal admission.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Too soon did the doctors of the church forget that the heart--the moral nature--was the beginning and the end, and that truth, knowledge, and insight were comprehended in its expansion.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

We should manage our thoughts as shepherds do their flowers in making a garland: first, select the choicest, and then dispose them in the most proper places, that every one may reflect a part of its color and brightness on the next.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Alas! they had been friends in youth; but whispering tongues can poison truth.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Trochee trips from long to short; From long to long in solemn sort Slow Spondee stalks.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Love is the admiration and cherishing of the amiable qualities of the beloved person, upon the condition of yourself being the object of their action.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Therefore all seasons shall be sweet to thee, Whether the summer clothe the general earth With greenness, or the redbreast sit and sing Betwixt the tufts of snow on the bare branch Of mossy apple tree.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

The rules of prudence, like the laws of the stone tables, are for the most part prohibitive. "Thou shalt not" is their characteristic formula.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Farce is nearer tragedy in its essence than comedy is.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Let every book-worm, when in any fragrant, scarce old tome, he discovers a sentence, a story, an illustration, that does his heart good, hasten to give it the widest circulation that newspapers and magazines, penny and halfpenny, can afford.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

How strange and awful is the synthesis of life and death in the gusty winds and falling leaves of an autumnal day!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

All Nature seems at work. Slugs leave their lair— The bees are stirring—birds are on the wing— And Winter, slumbering in the open air, Wears on his smiling face a dream of Spring! And I, the while, the sole unbusy thing, Nor honey make, nor pair, nor build, nor sing. Yet well I ken the banks where amaranths blow, Have traced the fount whence streams of nectar flow. Bloom, O ye amaranths! bloom for whom ye may, For me ye bloom not! Glide, rich streams, away! With lips unbrighten'd, wreathless brow, I stroll: And would you learn the spells that drowse my soul? Work without Hope draws nectar in a sieve, And Hope without an object cannot live. - Work without Hope

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

I have often thought what a melancholy world this would be without children, and what an inhuman world without the aged.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

We are now Courts of equity, and must decide the thing according to all the rights.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Greatness and goodness are not means, but ends! Hath he not always treasures, always friends, The good great man? Three treasures, love and light, And calm thoughts, regular as infants' breath; And three firm friends, more sure than day and night, Himself, his Maker, and the angel Death.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Joy is the sweet voice, joy the luminous cloud. We in ourselves rejoice! And thence flows all that charms or ear or sight, all melodies the echoes of that voice, all colours a suffusion from that light.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Creation rather than painting, or if painting, yet such, and with such co-presence of the whole picture flash'd at once upon the eye, as the sun paints in a camera obscura. (Describing his poetic ideal, 1817)

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

The principle of the Gothic architecture is infinity made imaginable. It is no doubt a sublimer effort of genius than the Greek style; but then it depends much more on execution for its effect.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

The poet, described in ideal perfection, brings the whole soul of man into activity, with the subordination of its faculties to each other according to their relative worth and dignity. He diffuses a tone and spirit of unity, that blends, and (as it were) fuses , each into each, by that synthetic and magical power, to which I would exclusively appropriate the name of Imagination.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

A savage place! as holy and enchanted As e'er beneath a waning moon was haunted By woman wailing for her demon-lover!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

The most happy marriage I can picture or imagine to myself would be the union of a deaf man to a blind woman.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

The heart should have fed upon the truth, as insects on a leaf, till it be tinged with the color, and show its food in every ... minutest fiber.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Of no agenor of any religion, or party or profession. The body and substance of his works came out of the unfathomable depths of his own oceanic mind.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

With no other privilege than that of sympathy and sincere good wishes, I would address an affectionate exhortation to the youthful literati, grounded on my own experience. It will be but short; for the beginning, middle, and end converge to one charge: NEVER PURSUE LITERATURE AS A TRADE.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

The worth and value of knowledge is in proportion to the worth and value of its object.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Lovely was the death Of Him whose life was Love! Holy with power, He on the thought-benighted Skeptic beamed Manifest Godhead.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

It would not be correct to say that every moral obligation involves a legal duty; but every legal duty is founded on a moral obligation.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

The imagination ... that reconciling and mediatory power, which incorporating the reason in images of the sense and organizing (as it were) the flux of the senses by the permanence and self-circling energies of the reason, gives birth to a system of symbols, harmonious in themselves, and consubstantial with the truths of which they are the conductors.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

A great mind must be androgynous.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Men of genius are rarely much annoyed by the company of vulgar people, because they have a power of looking at such persons as objects of amusement of another race altogether.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Prose: words in their best order; poetry: the best words in the best order.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

My eyes make pictures when they are shut.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Deep thinking is attainable only by a man of deep feeling, and all truth is a species of revelation

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Fellows of colleges in the universities are in one sense the recipients of alms, because they receive funds which originally were of an eleemosynary character.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

We have no adequate conception of the perfection of the ancient tragic dance. The pleasure which the greeks received from it had for its basis difference; & the more unfit the vehicle, the more lively was the curiosity & intense the delights at seeing the difficulty overcome.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Some persons have contended that mathematics ought to be taught by making the illustrations obvious to the senses. Nothing can be more absurd or injurious: it ought to be our never-ceasing effort to make people think, not feel.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

This world has angels all too few, and heaven is overflowing.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Frenchmen are like gunpowder, each by itself smutty and contemptible, but mass them together and they are terrible indeed!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

I have found words [in the Bible] for my inmost thoughts, songs for my joy, utterances for my hidden griefs, and pleadings for my shame and my feebleness.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Tranquillity! thou better name Than all the family of Fame.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Silence does not always mark wisdom.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Good and bad men are each less so than they seem.