Best 108 of Pride and prejudice quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

How earnestly did she then wish that her former opinions had been more reasonable, more moderate!

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

I am determined that nothing but the deepest love could ever induce me into matrimony. [Elizabeth]

By Anonym 17 Sep

Jane Austen

Nothing is more deceitful than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion and somethings an indirect boast.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jennifer Paynter

Before I could reply, he had picked me up, literally swept me off my feet, and kissed me. And afterwards, when I tried to speak, he silenced me in much the same manner. It was a shock (but not at all distasteful) to be so caught up. Later - when he at last set me down - he handled me more gently. He took of my glasses and told me that he loved me.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Jane Austen

My dear, dear aunt,' she rapturously cried, what delight! what felicity! You give me fresh life and vigour. Adieu to disappointment and spleen. What are men to rocks and mountains? Oh! what hours of transport we shall spend! And when we do return, it shall not be like other travellers, without being able to give one accurate idea of any thing. We will know where we have gone -- we will recollect what we have seen. Lakes, mountains, and rivers shall not be jumbled together in our imaginations; nor, when we attempt to describe any particular scene, will we begin quarrelling about its relative situation. Let our first effusions be less insupportable than those of the generality of travellers.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jennifer Paynter

I knew it was Peter playing. I fancied he was trying to tell me something - an absurd idea, but it persisted - 'I may not be able to spell, but just you listen to this.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Azar Nafisi

The insistence in Darcy's voice is a symptom of his passion for Elizabeth; it emerges even in their most mundane interactions. We can trace the development of Darcy's feelings for Elizabeth in the tone of his voice. This reaches its climax in the scene in which he proposes to her. His negative persistence, beginning his speech with 'In vain have I struggled. It will not do,' becomes almost violent, in part because the novel itself is so restrained and Darcy is the most restrained of all the characters. Now, please listen carefully to that 'you.' Darcy seldom if ever addresses Elizabeth by her name, but he has a special way of saying 'you' when he addresses her a few times that makes the impersonal pronoun a term of ultimate intimacy. One should appreciate such nuances in a culture such as ours, where everyone is encouraged to demonstrate in the most exaggerated manner his love for the Imam and yet forbidden from any public articulation of private feelings, especially love.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Jane Austen

Oh hang kitty; what has she to do with it? Come, be quick. Be quick. Where is your sash?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jennifer Paynter

Hello, Mary.' It was like hearing a note of divine calm after a dissonant passage of music. My confusion died away.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Django Wylie

It is a truth universally acknowledged, he’d mused, that most people will never find their ‘call me Ishmael’.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Rose Fairbanks

Bingley prowled his library like a caged animal. The rain separating him from Jane imprisoned him in the house, creating his own personal hell. His sisters worked themselves into a frenzy over the ball, his brother-in-law consoled himself with increasing amounts of drink, and Darcy stared into space with a small smile on his lips. He wondered if the world had turned upside down if Darcy was the besotted man, smiling too much while he grumbled over every detail.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Debra White Smith

Always remember to preserve your pride no matter what. Take pride in yourself and our family name. Never show weakness. Never admit failure..

By Anonym 18 Sep

Robert Ludlum

The easiest thing in the world is to convince yourself that you are right. As one grows older, this is easier still.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jennifer Paynter

Blessed with the love of a good man, I felt equal to anything - even the prospect of living out my days in the Antipodes.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Ernest Agyemang Yeboah

There is always a zone where somebody is nobody; there is always a zone where somebody is somebody and there is always a zone where nobody is nobody

By Anonym 20 Sep

Sue Barr

When did all the men in her life become so addlepated over a few country misses?

By Anonym 18 Sep

Jane Austen

Pride," observed Mary, who piqued herself upon the solidity of her reflections, "is a very common failing, I believe. By all that I have ever read, I am convinced that it it very common indeed; that human nature is particularly prone to it, and that there are very few of us who do not cherish a feeling of self-complacency on the score of some quality or the other, real or imaginary. Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have other think of us.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Jane Austen

There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of either merit or sense.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Mary Jane Hathaway

Lucy gripped her chilled glass of orange and raspberry juice. When Rebecca talked about Austen, she’d mostly mentioned Mr. Darcy or Mr. Knightley. She hadn’t really thought of the doe-eyed, pale-skinned heroines. On the screen, Anne Elliot walked down a long hallway, glancing just once at covered paintings, her mouth a grim line. Lucy thought Jane Austen would start the story with the romance, or the loss of it, but instead the tale seemed to begin with Anne’s home, and having to make difficult decisions. Maybe this writer from over two hundred years ago knew how everything important met at the intersection of family, home, love, and loss. This was something Lucy understood with every fiber of her being.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dodie Smith

Did you think of anything when Miss Marcy said Scoatney Hall was being re-opened? I thought of the beginning of Pride and Prejudice – where Mrs. Bennet says 'Netherfield Park is let a last.' And then Mr. Bennet goes over to call on the rich new owner.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth. From this day you must be a stranger to one of your parents.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jeanna Ellsworth

As soon as they had exited Longbourn, Bingley let out a hearty laugh and said, “Darcy, pray do tell me what happened in there!” “Whatever do you mean?” Darcy inquired. “I mean you and Mr. Wickham! That, my dear friend, was the closest thing to a cock fight I have ever witnessed!” Bingley’s face was smiling so broadly that Darcy suspected his cheeks must hurt.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jennifer Paynter

I felt my mouth go dry, my throat constrict. What possible interpretation could Peter place on those words, other than that they were about him? - that the entire song was about him?

By Anonym 19 Sep

Jane Austen

They have none of them much to recommend them", replied he: "they are all silly and ignorant like other girls; but Lizzy has something more of quickness than her sisters." "Mr. Bennet, how can you abuse your own children in such a way? You take delight in vexing me. You have no compassion on my poor nerves." "You mistake me my dear. I have a high respect for your nerves. They are my old friends. I have heard you mention them with consideration these twenty years at least.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Jane Austen

Some people call him proud but I am sure I never saw anything of it. To my fancy, it is only because he does not rattle away like other young men.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Abigail Reynolds

When a gentleman spends quite some time telling me in detail about his father's courtship of his mother, I have to assume there is some moral for me in the tale. Since in this case that courtship consisted primarily of his father insisting repeatedly they were to marry and his mother refusing him almost as often, I take the moral to be that there is very little point in refusing, since it would only lead to the question being repeated until I agreed to it out of sheer exhaustion.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Robyn Schneider

Marina rolled her eyes. "Besides, I saw the way you were staring at each other during lunch. You tow are so completely Pride and Prejudice." "You mean he'll scorn me for my family while convincing my sister's soul mate that eh doesn't really love her?" I asked hopefully.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Austen

But your good opinion is rarely bestowed and therefore more worth the earning.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Jane Austen

You may ask questions which I shall not choose to answer.

By Anonym 16 Sep

C. Allyn Pierson

I have come to realise that your are the most important person in the world to me, and I wanted to know if you would consider... if you would do me the honour of becoming my wife

By Anonym 16 Sep

Sarah Maclean

I do hope we shall meet again. Perhaps we could have a reading club of some sorts. I 've read that one." She leaned in. "Have you reached the part where Mr. Darcy proposes?" Asriel narrowed his gaze on Cross. "She did that on purpose." Pippa shook her head. "Oh, I did not ruin it. Elizabeth refuses." She paused. "I suppose I did ruin that. Apologies.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

If you will thank me," he replied, "let it be for yourself alone. That the wish of giving happiness to you might add force to the other inducements which led me on, I shall not attempt to deny. But your family owe me nothing. Much as I respect them, I believe I thought only of you." Elizabeth was too much embarrassed to say a word. After a short pause, her companion added, "You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged; but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever." Elizabeth, feeling all the more than common awkwardness and anxiety of his situation, now forced herself to speak; and immediately, though not very fluently, gave him to understand that her sentiments had undergone so material a change since the period to which he alluded, as to make her receive with gratitude and pleasure his present assurances.The happiness which this reply produced was such as he had probably never felt before, and he expressed himself on the occasion as sensibly and as warmly as a man violently in love can be supposed to do.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Jane Austen

You may well warn me against such an evil. Human nature is so prone to fall into it!

By Anonym 16 Sep

Elizabeth Eulberg

Hardly," I replied. "He despises me. Although probably not as much as I detest him." Tara smirked. "My, we certainly have strong feelings for someone, don't we? Are you sure you detest him, or is it something else?

By Anonym 18 Sep

Elizabeth Adams

So what do you think, Miss Bennet? Will you come to Pemberley?" He Spoke quietly over her shoulder; she hadn't realized he was so close. Feeling a mischievous impulse, likely from her nervousness at his proximity, she said the first thing that came to her mind. "It is tolerable, I suppose, but not hadsome enough to tempt me." Mr. Darcy's face went from shocked and angry, to hurt and confused, and finally to understanding as her words sunk in.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jane Austen

I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty women can bestow.' Miss Bingley immediately fixated her eyes on his face, and desired he would tell her what lady had the credit of inspiring such reflections. Mr. Darcy replied: 'Miss Elizabeth Bennet.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jennifer Paynter

I lost the letter in rather embarrassing circumstances. We were to dine at Parramatta Government House that same evening, and Peter had come in early from harvesting the wheat, sitting down in all his dirt to read the precious missive. I sat beside him, fresh from my bath. And so handsome did my husband look, long legs sprawled in Dungaree trousers and frowning over my father's spiky hand, that I could not resist reaching out to smooth away the frown. He caught my hand to his lips, still reading, and then chancing to look up, and reading my face more swiftly than he would ever read the written word, pulled me onto his lap.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Christopher Hitchens

I resolutely refuse to believe that the state of Edward's health had anything to do with this, and I don't say this only because I was once later accused of attacking him 'on his deathbed.' He was entirely lucid to the end, and the positions he took were easily recognizable by me as extensions or outgrowths of views he had expressed (and also declined to express) in the past. Alas, it is true that he was closer to the end than anybody knew when the thirtieth anniversary reissue of his Orientalism was published, but his long-precarious condition would hardly argue for giving him a lenient review, let alone denying him one altogether, which would have been the only alternatives. In the introduction he wrote for the new edition, he generally declined the opportunity to answer his scholarly critics, and instead gave the recent American arrival in Baghdad as a grand example of 'Orientalism' in action. The looting and destruction of the exhibits in the Iraq National Museum had, he wrote, been a deliberate piece of United States vandalism, perpetrated in order to shear the Iraqi people of their cultural patrimony and demonstrate to them their new servitude. Even at a time when anything at all could be said and believed so long as it was sufficiently and hysterically anti-Bush, this could be described as exceptionally mendacious. So when the Atlantic invited me to review Edward's revised edition, I decided I'd suspect myself more if I declined than if I agreed, and I wrote what I felt I had to. Not long afterward, an Iraqi comrade sent me without comment an article Edward had contributed to a magazine in London that was published by a princeling of the Saudi royal family. In it, Edward quoted some sentences about the Iraq war that he off-handedly described as 'racist.' The sentences in question had been written by me. I felt myself assailed by a reaction that was at once hot-eyed and frigidly cold. He had cited the words without naming their author, and this I briefly thought could be construed as a friendly hesitance. Or as cowardice... I can never quite act the stern role of Mr. Darcy with any conviction, but privately I sometimes resolve that that's 'it' as it were. I didn't say anything to Edward but then, I never said anything to him again, either. I believe that one or two charges simply must retain their face value and not become debauched or devalued. 'Racist' is one such. It is an accusation that must either be made good upon, or fully retracted. I would not have as a friend somebody whom I suspected of that prejudice, and I decided to presume that Edward was honest and serious enough to feel the same way. I feel misery stealing over me again as I set this down: I wrote the best tribute I could manage when he died not long afterward (and there was no strain in that, as I was relieved to find), but I didn't go to, and wasn't invited to, his funeral.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Elizabeth Jenkins

The celestial brightness of Pride and Prejudice is unequalled even in Jane Austen's other work; after a life of much disappointment and grief, in which some people would have seen nothing but tedium and emptiness, she stepped forth as an author, breathing gaiety and youth, robed in dazzling light.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Lauren Willig

Quite definitely a Bingley

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jennifer Paynter

I found I could listen without envy to Letty's singing, and afterwards when the applause came, I did not mind that Mrs Knowles was heaping praises upon her. Peter's hands were on my chair, and when I leaned back I could feel them against my shoulders.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Jane Austen

There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jeanna Ellsworth

Elizabeth could not believe what she was hearing. Mr. Darcy and Mr. Wickham were having a verbal duel right there in her sitting room!

By Anonym 16 Sep

Pamela Aidan

He had been the recipient, he now gratefully acknowledged, of a rare and precious gift. In demanding the hand of a woman he neither understood nor was capable of knowing, he had instead received from her the chance to see himself and the opportunity to become a better man. And he had changed. He knew he had. He knew that he was not that man stalking angrily back to his chambers in Rosings Hall. What had happened to him in those intervening months? He was not sure; he could offer no complete explanation, but the man who had opened Rosings's doors, already prepared to write an angry letter, was a stranger, a man who had been walking through his entire life asleep. But now, he had awoken.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jennifer Paynter

At that moment a solitary violin struck up. But the music was not dance music; it was more like a song - a solemn, sweet song. (I know now that it was Beethoven's Romance in F.) I listened, and suddenly it was as if the fog that surrounded me had been penetrated, as if I were being spoken to.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jennifer Paynter

I did not have an opportunity to speak privately with Peter until just as he was leaving, when he handed me one of the Burns song-sheets and (with a most earnest look) told me to read it before I went to bed. The song was 'My Love is Like a Red, Red Rose,' but it was not until was up in my bedchamber that I saw he had written on the inside page: 'My mother would be honoured if you visited her after church tomorrow.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Jane Austen

May we take my uncle's letter to read to her? Take whatever you like, and get away.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Jane Austen

Nada más capcioso que las apariencias de humildad. A veces nacen de pereza para sostener una opinión y a veces son un modo indirecto de elogiarse a sí mismo.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jennifer Paynter

After a moment, he added more seriously: 'I don't get as angry as m'father used to about things. Or maybe I', just better at hiding m'feelings.' 'I fear I'm not very good at hiding my feelings.' He covered my hand with his own. 'That's what I like about you. I liked it from the first. You're so different from the others.