Best 27 of Widow quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 19 Sep

Lisa Kleypas

They entered the summer parlor, where the Ravenels chatted amiably with his sisters, Phoebe and Seraphina. Phoebe, the oldest of the Challon siblings, had inherited their mother's warm and deeply loving nature, and their father's acerbic wit. Five years ago she had married her childhood sweetheart, Henry, Lord Clare, who had suffered from a chronic illness for most of his life. The worsening symptoms had gradually reduced him to a shadow of the man he'd once been, and he'd finally succumbed while Phoebe was pregnant with their second child. Although the first year of mourning was over, Phoebe hadn't yet returned to her former self. She went outdoors so seldom that her freckles had vanished, and she looked wan and thin. The ghost of grief still lingered in her gaze. Their younger sister, Seraphina, an effervescent eighteen-year-old with strawberry-blonde hair, was talking to Cassandra. Although Seraphina was old enough to have come out in society by now, the duke and duchess had persuaded her to wait another year. A girl with her sweet nature, her beauty, and her mammoth dowry would be targeted by every eligible man in Europe and beyond. For Seraphina, the London Season would be a gauntlet, and the more prepared she was, the better.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Elizabeth Berrien

In the first year of my grief, there were times when I felt like hiding my personal story of loss and other times when I wanted to wear a sign on my body that read "Be nice to me, I'm grieving," or "Don't tick me off; I've already got the world on my shoulders," or maybe even "BEWARE - don't upset the widow!" I needed a variety of signs that I could switch out depending on my daily mood.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Tamara Hoffa

Okay, Charlie, you can do this, all you have to do is convince a career military man that your son shouldn’t join the Army. That shouldn’t be too hard, right?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Shannon Celebi

I think first of the children. What the hell am I supposed to tell them? Then I think about money, the house, all those things no widow will tell you ever crossed her mind.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Ann Benjamin

You're not a virgin and you didn't get divorced, but suddenly there's this thing you can start doing again with someone who is not your husband.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Gabriel Garcia Marquez

From there he saw Fermina Daza walk in on her son's arm, dressed in an unadorned long-sleeved black velvet dress buttoned all the way from her neck to the tips of her shoes, like a bishop's cassock, and a narrow scarf of Castilian lace instead of the veiled hat worn by other widows, and even by many other ladies who longed for that condition

By Anonym 18 Sep

A. Alvarez

[Sylvia Plath] was now far along a peculiarly solitary road on which not many would risk following her. So it was important for her to know that her messages were coming back clear and strong. Yet not even her determinedly bright self-reliance could disguise the loneliness that came from her almost palpably, like a heat haze. She asked for neither sympathy nor help but, like bereaved widow at a wake, she simply wanted company in her mourning.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Artis Henderson

People kept giving me space, all of us hoping my grief had a half-life, but I didn't need space. I needed people to say Miles's name out loud. I needed them not to flinch when I said it. Weren't they curious about the color of his eyes? I needed them to acknowledge not just that he had died but that he had lived.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Tracy Anne Warren

To give herself a measure of credible autonomy, she had decided to invent a husband. Then, in a subsequent flash of inspiration, she had just as quickly killed him off.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lauren Lipton

A hundred years or more, she's bent her crown in storm, in sun, in moonsplashed midnight breeze. surviving all the random vagaries of this harsh world. A dense - twigged veil drifts down from crown along her trunk - mourning slow wood that rustles tattered, in a hint of wind this January dusk, cloudy, purpling the ground with sudden shadows. How she broods - you speculate - on dark surprise and loss, alone these many years, despondent, bent, her bolt-cracked mate transformed to splinters, moss. Though not alone, you feel the sadness of a twilight breeze. There's never enough love; the widow nods to you. Her branches moan.

By Anonym 15 Sep

K. Martin Beckner

Ain't no decent woman ever had that many husbands to die from natural causes.

By Anonym 18 Sep

R. Elizabeth Carpenter

Paco, we are all so much more than our faults, aren’t we?

By Anonym 19 Sep

Rose Andrews

There was only so much he could stand being mad at her for. She was being a pain but he still liked her.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Ann Benjamin

I guess 'joint' would imply two people had ownership, which, thanks Life, is simply no longer the case.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Tamara Hoffa

Wrapping his arms around her waist, he kissed her cheek. She inhaled his masculine scent, he smelled of engine grease, citrus hand cleaner and man. She turned in his arms and laid her cheek over his beating heart, treasuring the haven of his embrace...

By Anonym 17 Sep

Enock Maregesi

Mwanamke mwenye umri wa miaka arobaini na mbili na kuendelea anafaa kuolewa kama ni mjane na ataweza kuwapenda watoto wako kama mama yao alishafariki. Yule ambaye hajawahi kuolewa au aliyewahi kuolewa lakini akaachika bado ni kubahatisha, kwa sababu hujui kwa nini hajaolewa au kwa nini aliachika, hata kama ana watoto.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Katie Blanchard

Go ahead." That's all I say. Those two words, go ahead. Destroy me with what you are going to tell me. Bring me back to that night and pray it doesn't cripple me again.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walter De La Mare

A poor old Widow in her weeds Sowed her garden with wild-flower seeds; Not too shallow, and not too deep, And down came April -- drip -- drip -- drip. Up shone May, like gold, and soon Green as an arbour grew leafy June. And now all summer she sits and sews Where willow herb, comfrey, bugloss blows, Teasle and pansy, meadowsweet, Campion, toadflax, and rough hawksbit; Brown bee orchis, and Peals of Bells; Clover, burnet, and thyme she smells; Like Oberon's meadows her garden is Drowsy from dawn to dusk with bees. Weeps she never, but sometimes sighs, And peeps at her garden with bright brown eyes; And all she has is all she needs -- A poor Old Widow in her weeds.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Kristen Hope Mazzola

I felt bad for trying to live a happy, full life, while my heart was buried in a dead man’s chest.

By Anonym 18 Sep

K. Martin Beckner

Some of the more superstitious townsfolk even believed she was a witch. The fact that she had four dead husbands lined up in a neat row at the local Promise Land Cemetery was not an argument in her defense.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Sarah Brazytis

Giddy-up, giddy-up!" she cried, switching her horse's flanks with one of her mother's long knitting needles as a riding crop. "Take it easy!" Bear protested. "I'm going as fast as I can!" Caroline had to laugh at the sight. "Now if you don't ride nicely, I'll buck you off and run for the woods!" "No, you won't," retorted Bianca smugly. "It's too cold out there. Giddy-up!

By Anonym 18 Sep

Darrell Drake

She did not belong to the healthy group of widows and widowers who, after mourning, would nurture the seed of their grief into growing from loss—perhaps continuing the dreams of the lost, or learning to cherish alone the things they’d cherished together. She belonged instead to the sad lot who clung to grief, who nurtured it by never moving beyond it. They’d shelter it deep inside where the years padded it in saudade layers like some malignant pearl.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Michael Ben Zehabe

What changes when a woman marries? What does a woman lose and what does she gain? For Abishag, marrying king David gave her instant status. As a wife, impugning Abishag's character meant a swift death. As a wife, she inspired fear. What changes when a woman is widowed? For Abishag, it meant foreign women came to Jerusalem to marry Solomon--and she was relegated to that of a spectator. In Abishag's widowhood, none feared her. pg 17

By Anonym 18 Sep

R. Elizabeth Carpenter

...People are not one-dimensional. People do not live on one plane...

By Anonym 17 Sep

Kevin Hearne

Oberon’s been kidnapped along with one of the werewolves, and that’s why we’re all so upset. We’ll talk more tomorrow, and I promise to answer all your questions if I survive the night,” I said. The widow’s eyebrows raised. “Ye’ve got all these nasty pooches to run around with and ye still might die?” “I’m going to go fight with a god, some demons, and a coven of witches who all want to kill me,” I said, “so it’s a distinct possibility.” “Are y’goin’ t’kill ’em back?” “I’d certainly like to.” “Attaboy,” the widow chuckled. “Off y’go, then. Kill every last one o’ the bastards and call me in the mornin’.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Ann Benjamin

Maybe there is no one way to deal with grief, but knowing that we're not totally alone is the best we can do.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Anthony Liccione

I kiss her ghost, and sleep with the dust on her photograph, next to my bedside.