Best 25 of Elton Trueblood quotes - MyQuotes

Follow
Elton Trueblood
By Anonym 16 Sep

Elton Trueblood

His (Lincoln's) patriotism was saved from idolatry by the overwhelming sense of the sovereignty of God.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Elton Trueblood

The profound paradox is that the great man became more confident in his approach to others, including the man of his own Cabinet, but he recognized that his major confidence was not himself but in Another.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Elton Trueblood

There are many instances in history of people who allow their skepticism to cut the nerve of moral effort, and there are numerous people, on the other hand, who are fierce crusaders at the price of fanaticism. In his political commitments the fanatic makes claims for his particular case which cannot be validated by either a transcendent Providence or a neutral posterity.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Elton Trueblood

The Biblical language was so deeply embedded in the great man's mind that it became his normal way of speaking.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Elton Trueblood

The difficulty was not that of following a moral principle at personal cost; the difficulty was that of knowing what to do when there is more than one principal, and when the principles clash.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Elton Trueblood

Upon being given a Bible, President Abraham Lincoln replied, "In regard to this Great book, I have but to say, it is the best gift God has given to man.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Elton Trueblood

Always, in Lincoln's mature theology, there is paradox. There is starting this, yet there is also tenderness; there is melancholy, yet there is also humor: there is moral law, yet there is also compassion. History is the scene of the working out God's justice, which we can never escape, but it is also the scene of the revelation of the everlasting mercy.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Elton Trueblood

He was too perplexed to please the conventional and too reverent. to please the infidels.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Elton Trueblood

It is most remarkable that Lincoln, when he saw so much that was vulnerable in the leadership of the Church, did not move to the opposite error and become a scoffer.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Elton Trueblood

It is the vocation of the Christian in every generation to out-think all opposition.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Elton Trueblood

We have not advanced very far in our spiritual lives if we have not encountered the basic paradox of freedom, to the effect that we are most free when we are bound. But not just any way of being bound will suffice; what matters is the character of our binding. The one who would like to be an athlete, but who is unwilling to discipline his body by regular exercise and by abstinence, is not free to excel on the field or the track. His failure to train rigorously and to live abstemiously denies him the freedom to go over the bar at the desired height, or to run with the desired speed and endurance. With one concerted voice the giants of the devotional life apply the same principle to the whole of life with the dictum: Discipline is the price of freedom.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Elton Trueblood

The key to Lincoln's famous employment of humor is not that he failed to appreciate the tragic aspects of human existence, but rather that he felt these with such keeness that some relief was required.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Elton Trueblood

The question, he (Lincoln) said over and over, is not what a man's particular abilities may be, but what his rights are as a human being made in God's image.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Elton Trueblood

He (Lincoln) saw how intellectually and spiritually impoverished a person would be if he was limited to his own personal resources. The Bible, he recognized, vastly enlarged the area of experience on which an individual might depend.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Elton Trueblood

A major element in Lincoln's greatness was the way in which he could hold a strong moral position without the usual accompaniment of self-righteousness.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Elton Trueblood

God, Lincoln believed, is seen more clearly events that in nature, though He maybe seen there also. It is a majestic thing, thought Lincoln, for a person to be RESPONSIBLE.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Elton Trueblood

Deeply convinced of the reality of the divine will, he (Lincoln) had no patience at all with any who were perfectly sure they knew the details of the divine will.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Elton Trueblood

He (Lincoln) differed from fanatical moralists primarily in that he was always perplexed. No sooner did he believe he was doing God's will that he began to admit that God's purposes might be different from his own. In short, he never forgot the men's contrast between the absolute goodness of God and the faltering goodness of all who are in the finite predicament.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Elton Trueblood

He (Lincoln) recognized the delicate balance between immanence and transcendence, refusing to settle for either of these alone. His was a God who was both in the world and above the world.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Elton Trueblood

The writers in the newspapers could sounds smart because they did not have the responsibilities of decision, and they could sound bold by enunciating positions which they were not required to implement.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Elton Trueblood

Contradiction is the perfect evidence, he (Lincoln) thought, of human fallibility.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Elton Trueblood

(The death of his child) "was the first experience of his life, so far as we know, which drove him to look outside of his own mind and heart for help to endure a personal grief. It was the first time in his life when he had not been sufficient for his own experience.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Elton Trueblood

Take all of this Book upon reason that you can, and the balance on faith, and you will live and die a happier man.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Elton Trueblood

Man is most free when he is most guided.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Elton Trueblood

In the Church he (Lincoln) saw people who, though they hated war as much as the editors did, saw with clarity what the moral alternative was.