Best 325 of John Keats quotes - MyQuotes

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John Keats
By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

Dance and Provencal song and sunburnt mirth! On for a beaker full of the warm South, Full of the true, the blushful Hippocrene! With beaded bubbles winking at the brim, And purple-stained mouth.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Keats

There is an old saying "well begun is half done"-'tis a bad one. I would use instead-Not begun at all 'til half done.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Keats

What shocks the virtuous philosopher, delights the chameleon poet.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Keats

We read fine things but never feel them to the full until we have gone the same steps as the author.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Keats

The imagination may be compared to Adam's dream-he awoke and found it truth.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

Feeling well that breathed words Would all be lost, unheard, and vain as swords Against the enchased crocodile, or leaps Of grasshoppers against the sun.

By Anonym 16 Sep

John Keats

I do think the bars That kept my spirit in are burst - that I Am sailing with thee through the dizzy sky! How beautiful thou art!

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

I do think better of womankind than to suppose they care whether Mister John Keats five feet high likes them or not.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Keats

No stir of air was there, Not so much life as on a summer's day Robs not one light seed from the feather'd grass, But where the dead leaf fell, there did it rest.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Keats

To silence gossip, don't repeat it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Keats

'Tis the witching hour of night, Orbed is the moon and bright. And the stars they glisten, glisten, Seeming with bright eyes to listen- For what listen they?

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Keats

Turn the key deftly in the oiled wards, And seal the hushed Casket of my Soul.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Keats

Souls of poets dead and gone, What Elysium have ye known, Happy field or mossy cavern, Choicer than the Mermaid Tavern? Have ye tippled drink more fine Than mine host's Canary wine?

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

Are there not thousands in the world who love their fellows even to the death, who feel the giant agony of the world, and more, like slaves to poor humanity, labor for mortal good?

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Keats

My imagination is a monastery and I am its monk.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Keats

O magic sleep! O comfortable bird, That broodest o'er the troubled sea of the mind Till it is hush'd and smooth!

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

A thing of beauty is a joy forever: its loveliness increases; it will never pass into nothingness.

By Anonym 16 Sep

John Keats

I go amongst the buildings of a city and I see a Man hurrying along - to what?

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Keats

My chest of books divide amongst my friends.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

I have an habitual feeling of my real life having past, and that I am leading a posthumous existence.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Keats

No, no, I'm sure, My restless spirit never could endure To brood so long upon one luxury, Unless it did, though fearfully, espy A hope beyond the shadow of a dream.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Keats

My creed is love and you are its only tenet.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

Don't be discouraged by a failure. It can be a positive experience.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

I saw pale kings and princes too, Pale warriors, death-pale were they all; They cried- "La Belle Dame sans Merci Hath thee in thrall!

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections, and the truth of imagination.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

All my clear-eyed fish, Golden, or rainbow-sided, or purplish, Vermilion-tail'd, or finn'd with silvery gauze... My charming rod, my potent river spells.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

I cannot exist without you - I am forgetful of every thing but seeing you again - my Life seems to stop there - I see no further. You have absorb'd me. I have a sensation at the present moment as though I were dissolving... I have been astonished that Men could die Martyrs for religion - I have shudder'd at it - I shudder no more - I could be martyr'd for my Religion - Love is my religion - I could die for that - I could die for you. My creed is Love and you are its only tenet - You have ravish'd me away by a Power I cannot resist.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Keats

Thou art a dreaming thing, A fever of thyself.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Keats

There is a budding morrow in midnight.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

How astonishingly does the chance of leaving the world improve a sense of its natural beauties upon us. Like poor Falstaff, although I do not 'babble,' I think of green fields; I muse with the greatest affection on every flower I have know from my infancy - their shapes and colours are as new to me as if I had just created them with superhuman fancy.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Keats

There is a budding tomorrow in midnight.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Keats

The poetry of earth is never dead When all the birds are faint with the hot sun, And hide I cooling trees, a voice will run From hedge to hedge about the new-mown mead.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Keats

My friends should drink a dozen of Claret on my Tomb.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Keats

It is a flaw In happiness to see beyond our bourn, - It forces us in summer skies to mourn, It spoils the singing of the nightingale.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

I have two luxuries to brood over in my walks, your loveliness and the hour of my death. O that I could have possession of them both in the same minute.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Keats

Love is my religion - I could die for it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Keats

No one can usurp the heights... But those to whom the miseries of the world Are misery, and will not let them rest.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

And when thou art weary I'll find thee a bed, Of mosses and flowers to pillow thy head.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Keats

The genius of poetry must work out its own salvation in a man; it cannot be matured by law and precept, but by sensation and watchfulness in itself. That which is creative must create itself - In Endymion, I leaped headlong into the sea, and thereby have become better acquainted with the soundings, the quicksands, and the rocks, than if I had stayed upon the green shore, and piped a silly pipe, and took tea and comfortable sdvice.

By Anonym 19 Sep

John Keats

To Sleep" O soft embalmer of the still midnight, Shutting, with careful fingers and benign, Our gloom-pleas'd eyes, embower'd from the light, Enshaded in forgetfulness divine: O soothest Sleep! if so it please thee, close In midst of this thine hymn my willing eyes, Or wait the "Amen," ere thy poppy throws Around my bed its lulling charities. Then save me, or the passed day will shine Upon my pillow, breeding many woes,— Save me from curious Conscience, that still lords Its strength for darkness, burrowing like a mole; Turn the key deftly in the oiled wards, And seal the hushed Casket of my Soul.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Keats

Parting they seemed to tread upon the air, Twin roses by the zephyr blown apart Only to meet again more close.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Keats

They swayed about upon a rocking horse, And thought it Pegasus.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

Faded the flower and all its budded charms,Faded the sight of beauty from my eyes,Faded the shape of beauty from my arms,Faded the voice, warmth, whiteness, paradise!Vanishd unseasonably

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Keats

Or thou might'st better listen to the wind, Whose language is to thee a barren noise, Though it blows legend-laden through the trees.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Keats

There is nothing stable in the world; uproar's your only music.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

I shall soon be laid in the quiet grave--thank God for the quiet grave--O! I can feel the cold earth upon me--the daisies growing over me--O for this quiet--it will be my first.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Keats

I never knew before, what such a love as you have made me feel, was; I did not believe in it; my Fancy was afraid of it, lest it should burn me up. But if you will fully love me, though there may be some fire, 'twill not be more than we can bear when moistened and bedewed with Pleasures.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Keats

To feel forever its soft fall and swell, Awake for ever in a sweet unrest, Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath, And so live ever-or else swoon in death.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Keats

Oh what can ail thee, knight-at-arms, Alone and palely loitering?