Best 21 of Ian Lamont quotes - MyQuotes

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Ian Lamont
By Anonym 15 Sep

Ian Lamont

At the end of the day, taking 50% off a $250 dress still means walking out of the store $125 poorer.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Ian Lamont

I vividly remember going to Google Docs, opening a document at the same time other students were working on it, and seeing their differently colored cursors moving around the screen, typing new words and making edits in real time. It was an epiphany.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Ian Lamont

Manuscript editions didn't immediately die out with the printing explosion that burst across Europe in the 1460s and 1470s. Manuscripts continued to be produced into the 16th century, many decades after presses had spread to most minor cities in Western Europe.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Ian Lamont

Not only are we digital immigrants, we are also media dinosaurs. We enjoy thumbing through glossy magazines, and maybe still subscribe to a daily newspaper. We schedule at least one evening per week around a favorite TV program, created by one of the major television or cable networks. We can name at least one local or national news anchor. And scattered around our homes and offices are veritable graveyards of physical media — old tapes, vinyl records, floppy disks, and magazines — that we insist on keeping, even though we'll probably never use them again.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Ian Lamont

Thanks to relentless media exposure and little-understood financing and sales practices, not to mention the perception of autos as important status indicators, most people replace their cars on a regular basis.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Ian Lamont

We’re creatures of habit when it comes to mobile contracts and the wires piping high-speed data into our homes. It’s a pain to deal with transfers, installations, and customer service interactions, so we shrug and keep paying a premium.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Ian Lamont

In the online math class, there was almost no meaningful student/teacher or student/student interaction. To equate this type of online learning with a real-world classroom experience is a major stretch.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ian Lamont

A new car can be driven for 10 years or more if it’s properly maintained. Heck, drive that sucker into the ground before you replace it!

By Anonym 19 Sep

Ian Lamont

The starting point for ‘discounts’ may be the manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP), an arbitrarily high price that no one will ever pay. By crossing out the high MSRP, retailers are handing shoppers a psychological victory that will make them feel good about the purchase, even if the discounted price is still expensive.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Ian Lamont

Excel suffers from an image problem. Most people assume that spreadsheet programs such as Excel are intended for accountants, analysts, financiers, scientists, mathematicians, and other geeky types. Creating a spreadsheet, sorting data, using functions, and making charts seems daunting, and best left to the nerds.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Ian Lamont

Tweets about the mundane aspects of your life contain something that is vitally important to gaining followers and taking part in discussions: Authenticity.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Ian Lamont

The most effective learning takes place in the classroom, where you can easily raise your hand, engage in spontaneous discussions with classmates and faculty, turn to the person next to you to ask for clarification, or approach the professor after class or during office hours to ask questions or exchange viewpoints in a way that practically guarantees an instant response and is not constrained by typing, software interfaces, or waiting for a response.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Ian Lamont

Old media companies will be further challenged in the next 15 years, as a new wave of user-generated content washes over the Internet, thanks to the increasing availability and affordability of portable, digital-based electronic devices. The cameraphones which seemed like such novelties just a few years ago will be in everyone's purse and pocket a few years from now.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Ian Lamont

I am skeptical that distance education based on asynchronous Internet technologies (i.e., prerecorded video, online forums, and email) is a substitute for live classroom discussion and other on-campus interaction. Distance education students can't raise their hands to ask instructors questions or participate in discussions, and it's difficult or impossible for them to take advantage of faculty office hours. Teaching assistants don't always respond to email, and online class discussion boards can be neglected by students and faculty alike. In this sense, the "process of dialogue" is actually limited by technology.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ian Lamont

Are your kids better off watching 10 hours of Nickelodeon and the Disney Channel every week?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Ian Lamont

In business presentations, positive impressions can help make a sale or win over an audience.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Ian Lamont

If Auto Fill is the Japanese throwing star of spreadsheets, then making charts surely is the equivalent of Japanese calligraphy. With just a few clicks of the mouse, it’s possible to turn your raw data into visual presentations that will impress all who come near.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Ian Lamont

If you’ve driven new cars all of your life, the term “used vehicle” may conjure up images of a dusty old beater with missing hubcaps and no A/C, dragging a clattering muffler down the boulevard. Yes, such cars exist, but I am not advocating that you buy one. Besides the embarrassment, there are also safety concerns and additional maintenance costs associated with clunkers.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ian Lamont

Automatic synchronization is the killer feature of Dropbox, something that will save lots of time and streamline collaboration.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Ian Lamont

The 'fear of change' excuse is something you see trotted out by organizations or management that believe customers are old, stupid, ignorant, and stubborn.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Ian Lamont

Get used to the idea of significant portion of the population walking around with high-speed Internet connections on their person, with sophisticated video cameras built in. They will be shooting all kinds of events all the time. Crime. Crashes. Speeches. Sports. And the footage won't be the short, sanitized and safe versions we usually see on television, courtesy of the old media gatekeepers. The user-generated pictures and video will be raw and real. It will be disturbing, yet illuminating. And it will be shared over the 'Net almost as it happens, and available for everyone to see.