Best 23 of Caregiver quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 18 Sep

Josephine Harwood

She cleared her throat. “Bryan, I know you’ve interviewed a lot of caregivers—” “Too many,” Bryan shot back. She inched her chin up a notch. “I’m not your typical caregiver. I’m different.” Bryan laughed with no humor. “Yeah, I’ve heard that one before—okay, impress me, Delilah Walker. What exactly makes you different?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Peggi Speers

I believe that most caregivers find that they inherit a situation where they just kind of move into caregiving. It's not a conscious decision for most caregivers, and they are ultimately left with the responsibility of working while still trying to be the caregiver, the provider, and the nurturer.- Sharon Law Tucker

By Anonym 16 Sep

Nancy L. Kriseman

Embracing a healing presence requires you to just be in the moment together.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Judy Cornish

Offering care means being a companion, not a superior. It doesn’t matter whether the person we are caring for is experiencing cancer, the flu, dementia, or grief. If you are a doctor or surgeon, your expertise and knowledge comes from a superior position. But when our role is to be providers of care, we should be there as equals.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Peggi Speers

I love you but I got to love me more.

By Anonym 17 Sep

John Passaro

My original fear that my daughter was going to die before BettyJane and myself has now been replaced with the fear that she is going to outlive us.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Dan Gasby

The literature has only these words of comfort for a patient and her family at this stage. Remember, there is still a living spirit inside this diminished person, the spirit of someone you love.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charisse Montgomery

An exhausted parent can’t provide the best care, although occasionally, we have all had to do so.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Mokokoma Mokhonoana

Not a few millions of parents strongly hope that their own children will step in by instantly becoming their own parents’ foster parents, if and when the parents reach their second childhood.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Sherman Alexie

Gay people were seen as magical, too. I mean, like in many cultures, men were viewed as warriors and women were viewed as caregivers. But gay people, being both male and female, were seen as both warriors and caregivers. Gay people could do anything. They were like Swiss Army knives!

By Anonym 19 Sep

Daniel J. Siegel

... the roots of security and resilience are to be found in the sense of being understood by and having the sense of existing in the heart and mind of a loving, caring, attuned and self-processed other, an other with a mind and heart of her own.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Nancy L. Kriseman

Caregiving will never be one-size-fits-all.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Peggi Speers

Many of us follow the commandment 'Love One Another.' When it relates to caregiving, we must love one another with boundaries. We must acknowledge that we are included in the 'Love One Another.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Josephine Harwood

Bryan, I know you’ve interviewed a lot of caregivers—” “Too many,” Bryan shot back. She inched her chin up a notch. “I’m not your typical caregiver. I’m different.” Bryan laughed with no humor. “Yeah, I’ve heard that one before—okay, impress me, Delilah Walker. What exactly makes you different?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Daniel J. Siegel

Evolutionarily, the function of attachment has been to protect the organism from danger. The attachment figure, an older, kinder, stronger, wiser other (Bowlby, 1982), functions as a safe base (Ainsworth et al., 1978), and is a presence that obviates fear and engenders a feeling of safety for the younger organism. The greater the feeling of safety, the wider the range of exploration and the more exuberant the exploratory drive (i.e., the higher the threshold before novelty turns into anxiety and fear). Thus, the fundamental tenet of attachment theory: security of attachment leads to an expanded range of exploration. Whereas fear constricts, safety expands the range of exploration. In the absence of dyadically constructed safety, the child has to contend with fear-potentiating aloneness. The child will devote energy to conservative, safety enhancing measures, that is, defense mechanisms, to compensate for what's missing. The focus on maintaining safety and managing fear drains energy from learning and exploration, stunts growth, and distorts personality development.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Peggi Speer

Never give up hope. If you do, you'll be dead already.-- Dementia Patient Rose in The Inspired Caregiver

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charisse Montgomery

An informed parent or caregiver becomes empowered, and empowerment can lead to the best care for our children.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Daniel J. Siegel

One form of insecurity of attachment, called "disorganized/disoriented", has been associated with marked impairments in the emotional, social, and cognitive domains, and a predisposition toward a clinical condition known as dissociation in which the capacity to function in an organized, coherent manner is at times impaired. Studies have also found that youths with a history of disorganized attachments are at great risk of expressing hostility with their peers and have the potential for interpersonal violence as they mature (Lyons-Ruth & Jacobwitz, 1999; Carlson, 1998). This disorganized form of attachment has been proposed to be associated with the caregiver's frightened, frightening, or disoriented behavior with the child. Such experiences create a state of alarm in the child. The parents of these children often have an autobiographical narrative finding, as revealed in the Adult Attachment Interview, of unresolved trauma or grief that appears as a disorientation in their narrative account of their childhoods. Such linguistic disorientation occurs during the discussion of loss or threat from childhood experiences. Lack of resolution appears to be associated with parental behaviors that are incompatible with an organized adaptation on the part of the child. Lack of resolution of trauma or grief in a parent can lead to parental behaviors that create "paradoxical", unsolvable, and problematic situations for the child. The attachment figure is intended to be the source of protection, soothing, connections, and joy. Instead, the experience of the child who develops a disorganized attachment is such that the caregiver is actually the source of terror and fear, of "fright without solution", and so the child cannot turn to the attachment figure to be soothed (Main & Hesse, 1990). There is not organized adaptation and the child's response to this unsolvable problem is disorganization (see Hesse et al., this volume).

By Anonym 17 Sep

Peggi Speers

Never give up hope. If you do, you'll be dead already.--Dementia Patient, Rose from The Inspired Caregiver

By Anonym 15 Sep

Melanie Bennett

But in a home where grief is fresh and patience has long worn thin, making it through another day is often heroic in itself.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Peggi Speers

By loving you more, you love the person you are caring for more.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Nancy L. Kriseman

One goal of the mindful caregiver is to find ways to not feel ‘dis-eased’ in the caregiving process.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Nancy L. Kriseman

As your care recipient’s advocate, be involved, don’t accept the status quo, and don’t be afraid to voice your concerns.