Best 165 of Mark Haddon quotes - MyQuotes

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Mark Haddon
By Anonym 16 Sep

Mark Haddon

Carcharadon carcharias. Six thousand pounds of muscle powering a hoop of butcher's knives. The only animal that ate its weaker siblings in the womb. Immune from cancer. Constantly awake.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Mark Haddon

I think she cared more for that bloody dog than for me, for us. And maybe that's not so stupid, looking back... maybe it is easier living on your own looking after some stupid mutt than sharing your life with other actual human beings.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mark Haddon

At 20, 25, 30, we begin to realise that the possibilities of escape are getting fewer. We have jobs, children, partners, debts. This is the part of us to which literary fiction speaks.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mark Haddon

When I was writing for children, I was writing genre fiction. It was like making a good chair. However beautiful it looked, it needed four legs of the same length, it had to be the right height and it had to be comfortable.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mark Haddon

Show me the artist anywhere who's had an utterly stable mental life, and I'll buy you hot dinners for the rest of your life.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mark Haddon

My book has a very simple surface, but there are layers of irony and paradox all the way through it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mark Haddon

Because time is not like space. And when you put something down somewhere, like a protractor or a biscuit, you can have a map in your head to tell you where you have left it, but even if you don't have a map it will still be there because a map is a representation of things that actually exist so you can find the protractor or the biscuits again. And a timetable is a map of time, except that if you don't have a timetable, time isn't there like the landing and the garden and the route to school.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Mark Haddon

It was true. There really was no limit to the ways in which you could say the wrong thing to your children. You offered an olive branch and it was the wrong olive branch at the wrong time.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Mark Haddon

Prime numbers are useful for writing codes and in America they are classed as Military Material and if you find one over 100 digits you have to tell the CIA and they buy it off you for $10,000. But it would not be a very good way of making a living.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mark Haddon

And it occurred to him that there were two parts to being a better person. One part was thinking about other people. The other part was not giving a toss what other people thought.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mark Haddon

Most adults, unlike most children, understand the difference between a book that will hold them spellbound for a rainy Sunday afternoon and a book that will put them in touch with a part of themselves they didn't even know existed.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mark Haddon

All those other lives. You never did get to lead them.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mark Haddon

I am atheist in a very religious mould. I'm always asking myself the big questions. Where did we come from? Is there a meaning to all of this? I read the King James Bible, as all English writers should. And when I find myself in church, I edit the hymns as I sing them.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mark Haddon

If one book's done this well, you want to write another one that does just as well. There's that horror of the second novel that doesn't match up.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mark Haddon

As a kid, I didn't read a great deal of fiction, and I've forgotten most of what I did read.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mark Haddon

Things can be funny when people are uneasy. It softens them up and stops them falling asleep on the sofa. I like those moments where people half-smile and half-wince.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mark Haddon

Usually people look at you when they're talking to you. I know that they're working out what I'm thinking, but I can't tell what they're thinking. It is like being in a room with a one-way mirror in a spy film.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mark Haddon

But in life you have to take lots of decisions and if you don't take decisions you would never do anything because you would spend all your time choosing between things you could do. So it is good to have a reason why you hate some things and you like others.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Mark Haddon

In life, you have to take lots of decisions and if you don't take decisions you would never do anything because you would spend all your time choosing between things you could do.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mark Haddon

The one thing you have to do if you write a book is put yourself in someone else's shoes. The reader's shoes. You've got to entertain them.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mark Haddon

And because there is something they can’t see people think it has to be special, because people always think there is something special about what they can’t see, like the dark side of the moon, or the other side of a black hole, or in the dark when they wake up at night and they’re scared.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mark Haddon

Then he asked if I didn’t like things changing. And I said I wouldn’t mind things changing if I became an astronaut, for example, which is one of the biggest changes you can imagine, apart from becoming a girl or dying.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mark Haddon

Fiction that responds to recent world events is a hostage to fortune because all momentous events look very different a year, two years, three years later.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mark Haddon

I went to boarding school and then I went to Oxford, and I know how easy it is for certain groups of people to become wholly insulated from ordinary life.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mark Haddon

I think the U.K. is too small to write about from within it and still make it seem foreign and exotic and interesting.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mark Haddon

And intuition is what people is what people use in life to make decisions.But logic can help you work out the right answer.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mark Haddon

What I love about the theatre is that it's always metaphorical. It's like going back to being a kid again, and we're all pretending in a room. Sometimes, when the pretending really works, I find it much, much more moving than something on film.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mark Haddon

I was born too late for steam trains and a lazy eye meant I'd never be an astronaut.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mark Haddon

As a teenager, I was always this strange mixture of kind of vice-captain of the rugby team and sensitive artist type the rest of the time. I was sent away to this public school in the middle of nowhere, and I think we managed to completely miss out on normal youth culture.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mark Haddon

At teenage parties he was always wandering into the garden, sitting on a bench in the dark . . . staring up at the constellations and pondering all those big questions about the existence of God and the nature of evil and the mystery of death, questions which seemed more important than anything else in the would until a few years passed and some real questions had been dumped into your lap, like how to earn a living, and why people fell in and out of love, and how long you could carry on smoking and then give up without getting lung cancer.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mark Haddon

You could ask for hugs if you were feeling sad or you'd hurt yourself, but when it happened spontaneously it made you feel warm inside.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mark Haddon

Indeed, I am repeatedly astonished by the number of really good writers who understand human beings so well on paper but don't know how to deal with them in real life.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mark Haddon

Well, we're meant to be writing stories today.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mark Haddon

A scuola la signora Forbes mi disse che quando mia madre era morta era volata in cielo. Mi aveva raccontato questa cosa perché la signora Forbes è molto vecchia e crede nell’aldilà. Porta sempre i pantaloni della tuta perché sostiene che sono molto più comodi dei pantaloni normali. E ha una gamba leggermente più corta dell’altra a causa di un incidente in moto. Quando mia madre è morta, però, non è andata in cielo perché il cielo non esiste. Il marito della signora Peters è un prete che tutti chiamano il Reverendo Peters, e ogni tanto viene a trovarci a scuola per parlare un po’ con noi; un giorni gli chiesi dove fosse il cielo. - Non è nella nostra galassia. È un luogo a sè, - rispose. Qualche volta il Reverendo Peters emette uno strano verso mentre pensa, una specie di ticchettio con la lingua. E fuma e si sente l’odore delle sigarette mentre tespira e a me dà fastidio. Dissi che non c’era niente fuori dall’universo e che non poteva esistere un luogo a sè. A meno che non si attraversi un buco nero, ma un buco nero è ciò che si definisce una Singolarità, che significa che è impossibile scoprire cosa c’è dall’altra parte perché la forza di gravità di un buco nero è talmente potente che persino le onde elettromagnetiche come la luce non riescono a sfuggirle, e le onde elettromagnetiche sono il mezzo attraverso il quale riceviamo le informazioni su tutto ciò che è lontano da noi. Se il cielo si trovasse dall’altro lato di un buco nero i morti dovrebbero essere scaraventati nello spazio su dei razzi per arrivare fin lassù e così non è, altrimenti la gente se ne accorgerebbe. Penso che le persone credano nell’aldilà perché detestano l’idea di morire, perché vogliono continuare a vivere e odiano pensare che altri loro simili possano trasferirsi in casa loro e buttare tutte le loro cose nel bidone della spazzatura. Il Reverendo Peters spiegò: - Be’, quando dico che il cielo è fuori dall’universo è solo un modo di dire. Immagino che ciò che significa veramente è che i defunti sono con Dio. - Ma Dio dov’è? Allora il Reverendo Peters tagliò corto dicendo che avremmo fatto meglio a discuterne in un altro momento, quando avessimo avuto più tempo a disposizione. Ciò che di fatto avviene quando una persona muore è che il cervello smette di funzionare e il corpo si decompone, come quando morí Coniglio e noi lo seppellimmo in fondo al giardino. E tutte le sue molecole si frantumarono in altre molecole e si sparsero nella terra e vennero mangiate dai vermi e defluirono nelle piante, e se tra 10 anni andremo a scavare nello stesso punto non troveremo altro che il suo scheletro. E tra 1000 anni anche il suo scheletro sarà scomparso. Ma va bene ugualmente perché adesso lui è parte dei fiori e del melo e del cespuglio di biancospino. Quando una persona muore qualche volta viene messa in una bara, che significa che il suo corpo non si unirà alla terra per moltissimo tempo, finché anche il legno della bara non marcirà. Mia madre però fu cremata. Questo vuol dire che è stata messa in una bara e bruciata e polverizzata per poi trasformarsi in cenere e fumo. Non so cosa capiti alla cenere e non potei fare domande al cimitero perché non andai al funerale. Però so che il fumo esce da lcamino e si disperde nell’aria e allora qualche volta guardo il cielo e penso che ci siano delle molecole di mia madre lassù, o nelle nuvole sopra l’Africa o l’Antartico, oppure che scendano sotto forma di pioggia nelle foreste pluviali del Brasile, o si trasformino in neve da qualche parte, nel mondo.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mark Haddon

And I know I can do this because I went to London on my own, and because I solved the mystery…and I was brave and I wrote a book and that means I can do anything.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mark Haddon

I am really interested in eccentric minds. It's rather like being fascinated by how cars work. It's really boring if your car works all the time. But as soon as something happens, you get the bonnet up. If someone has an abnormal or dysfunctional state of mind, you get the bonnet up.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Mark Haddon

I think prime numbers are like life. They are very logical but you could never work out the rules, even if you spent all your time thinking about them

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mark Haddon

I do not tell lies. Mother used to say that this was because I was a good person. But it is not because I am a good person. It is because I do not tell lie.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mark Haddon

Appalling things can happen to children. And even a happy childhood is filled with sadnesses. Is there any other period in your life when you hate your best friend on Monday and love them again on Tuesday? But at eight, 10, 12, you don't realise you're going to die. There is always the possibility of escape. There is always somewhere else and far away, a fact I had never really appreciated until I read Gitta Sereny's profoundly unsettling Cries Unheard about child-killer Mary Bell. At 20, 25, 30, we begin to realise that the possibilities of escape are getting fewer. We begin to picture a time when there will no longer be somewhere else and far away. We have jobs, children, partners, debts, responsibilities. And if many of these things enrich our lives immeasurably, those shrinking limits are something we all have to come to terms with. This, I think, is the part of us to which literary fiction speaks.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mark Haddon

All the other children at my school are stupid. Except I'm not meant to call them stupid, even though this is what they are.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mark Haddon

Lots of things are mysteries. But that doesn't mean there isn't an answer to them. It's just that scientists haven't found the answer yet.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Mark Haddon

Some people think the Milky Way is a long line of stars, but it isn't. Our galaxy is a huge disk of stars millions of light-years across, and the solar system is somewhere near the outside edge of the disk.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mark Haddon

And when the universe has finished exploding all the stars will slow down, like a ball that has been thrown into the air, and they will come to a halt and they will all begin to fall towards the centre of the universe again. And then there will be nothing to stop us seeing all the stars in the world because they will all be moving towards us, gradually faster and faster, and we will know that the world is going to end soon because when we look up into the sky at night there will be no darkness, just the blazing light of billions and billions of stars, all falling.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Mark Haddon

...most people are almost blind and they don’t see most things and there is lots of spare capacity in their heads and it is filled with things which aren’t connected and are silly, like, “I’m worried that I might have left the gas cooker on.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Mark Haddon

How often did he feel it now, this gorgeous, furtive seclusion? In the bath sometimes, maybe. Though Jean failed to understand his need for periodic isolation and regularly dragged him back to earth mid-soak by hammering on the locked door in search of bleach or dental floss.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mark Haddon

It wasn't about believing this or that, it wasn't even about good and evil and right and wrong, it was about finding the strength to bear the discomfort that came with being in the world.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mark Haddon

Use your imagination and you'll see that even the most narrow, humdrum lives are infinite in scope if you examine them with enough care.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mark Haddon

Jane Austen was writing about boring people with desperately limited lives. We forget this because we've seen too many of her books on screen.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Mark Haddon

people believe in God because the world is very complicated and they think it is very unlikely that anything as complicated as a flying squirrel or the human eye or a brain could happen by chance.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mark Haddon

I think good books have to make a few people angry.