Best 284 of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie quotes - MyQuotes

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Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
By Anonym 16 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Is Obama Anything but Black? So lots of folk—mostly non-black—say Obama’s not black, he’s biracial, multiracial, black-and-white, anything but just black. Because his mother was white. But race is not biology; race is sociology. Race is not genotype; race is phenotype. Race matters because of racism. And racism is absurd because it’s about how you look. Not about the blood you have. It’s about the shade of your skin and the shape of your nose and the kink of your hair. Booker T. Washington and Frederick Douglass had white fathers. Imagine them saying they were not black. Imagine Obama, skin the color of a toasted almond, hair kinky, saying to a census worker—I’m kind of white. Sure you are, she’ll say. Many American Blacks have a white person in their ancestry, because white slave owners liked to go a-raping in the slave quarters at night. But if you come out looking dark, that’s it. (So if you are that blond, blue-eyed woman who says “My grandfather was Native American and I get discrimination too” when black folk are talking about shit, please stop it already.) In America, you don’t get to decide what race you are. It is decided for you. Barack Obama, looking as he does, would have had to sit in the back of the bus fifty years ago. If a random black guy commits a crime today, Barack Obama could be stopped and questioned for fitting the profile. And what would that profile be? “Black Man.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Your feminist premise should be: I matter. I matter equally. Not "if only." Not "as long as." I matter equally. Full stop.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

I write from real life. I am an unrepentant eavesdropper and a collector of stories. I record bits of overheard dialogue.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

The Tanzanian told her that all fiction was therapy, some sort of therapy, no matter what anybody said.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Americans think African writers will write about the exotic, about wildlife, poverty, maybe AIDS. They come to Africa and African books with certain expectations.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

He spoke so effortlessly, as if his mouth were a musical instrument that just let sound out when touched, when opened.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Show her that she does not need to be liked by everyone. Tell her that if someone does not like her, there will be someone else who will. Teach her that she not merely an object to be liked or disliked, she is also a subject who can like and dislike.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Feminist: A person who believes in the social, political and economic equality of the sexes.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Perhaps it is time to debate culture. The common story is that in "real" African culture, before it was tainted by the west, gender roles were rigid and women were contentedly oppressed.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

it would hurt him to know she had felt that way for a while, that her relationship with him was like being content in a house but always sitting by the window and looking out.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Other men might respond by saying: Okay, this is interesting, but I don’t think like that. I don’t even think about gender. Maybe not. And that is part of the problem. That many men do not actively think about gender or notice gender.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Surround her with a village of aunties, women who have qualities you’d like her to admire. Talk about how much you admire them. Children copy and learn my example. Talk about what you admire about them.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

She did not tell him this, because it would hurt him to know she had felt that way for a while, that her relationship with him was like being content in a house but always sitting by the window and looking out.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

El mundo entero está lleno de artículos de revistas y libros que les dicen a las mujeres qué tienen que hacer, cómo tienen que ser y cómo no tienen que ser si quieren atraer o complacer a los hombres. Hay muchas menos guías para enseñar a los hombres a complacer a las mujeres.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Your life belongs to you and you alone.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

The point of diversity workshops, or multicultural talks, was not to inspire any real change but to leave people feeling good about themselves. They did not want the content of her ideas; they merely wanted the gesture of her presence. They had not read her blog but they had heard that she was a “leading blogger” about race.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

America has always been aspirational to me.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Women must be "covered up" to protect men. I find this deeply dehumanizing because it reduces women to mere props used to manage the appetites of men.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

I can write with authority only about what I know well, which means that I end up using surface details of my own life in my fiction.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Teach her to question men who can have empathy for women only if they see them as relational rather than as individual equal humans.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

They never said “I don’t know.” They said, instead, “I’m not sure,” which did not give any information but still suggested the possibility of knowledge.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Teach her about difference. Make difference ordinary. Make difference normal. Teach her not to attach value to difference. And the reason for this is not to be fair or to be nice but merely to be human and practical. Because difference is the reality of our world. And by teaching her about difference, you are equipping her to survive in a diverse world. She must know and understand that people walk different paths in the world and that as long as those paths do no harm to others, they are valid paths that she must respect. Teach her that we do not know – we cannot know – everything about life. Both religion and science have spaces for the things we do not know, and it is enough to make peace with that. Teach her never to universalise her own standards or experiences. Teach her that her standards are for her alone, and not for other people. This is the only necessary form of humility: the realisation that difference is normal.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Don’t see it as forgiving him. See it as allowing yourself to be happy. What will you do with the misery you have chosen? Will you eat misery?

By Anonym 18 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

The longer she spent in America, the better she had become at distinguishing, sometimes from looks and gait, but mostly from bearing and demeanor, that fine-grained mark that culture stamps on people. (Chapter 17)

By Anonym 18 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

She rested her head against his and felt, for the first time, what she would often feel with him: a self-affection. He made her like herself. With him, she was at ease; her skin felt as though it was her right size.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

When we say fathers are "helping," we are suggesting that child care is a mother's territory, into which fathers valiantly venture. It is not.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Be a full person. Motherhood is a glorious gift, but do not define yourself solely by motherhood. Be a full person. Your child will benefit from that.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Mama had greeted him the traditional way that women were supposed to, bending low and offering him her back so that he would pat it with his fan made of the soft, straw-colored tail of an animal. Back home that night, Papa told Mama that it was sinful. You did not bow to another human being. It was an ungodly tradition, bowing to an Igwe. So, a few days later, when we went to see the bishop at Awka, I did not kneel to kiss his ring. I wanted to make Papa proud. But Papa yanked my ear in the car and said I did not have the spirit of discernment: the bishop was a man of God; the Igwe was merely a traditional ruler.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

His optimism blinded her. He was full of plans. "I have an idea!" he said often. She imagined him as a child surrounded by too many brightly colored toys, always being encouraged to carry out "projects", always being told that his mundane ideas were wonderful.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

The best thing about America is that it gives you space. I like that. I like that you buy into the dream, it's a lie but you buy into it and that's all that matters.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Papa said that the parish priest in Abba was not spiritual enough. That was the problem with our people, Papa told us, our priorities were wrong; we cared too much about huge church buildings and mighty statues. You would never see white people doing that.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

And then we do a much greater disservice to girls, because we raise them to cater to the fragile egos of males.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

We condition girls to aspire to marriage and we do not condition boys to aspire to marriage, and so there is already a terrible imbalance at the start. The girls will grow up to be women preoccupied with marriage. The boys will grow up to be men who are not preoccupied with marriage. The women marry those men. The relationship is automatically uneven because the institution matters more to one than the other. Is it any wonder that, in so many marriages, women sacrifice more, at a loss to themselves, because they have to constantly maintain an uneven exchange?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

The real tragedy of our postcolonial world is not that the majority of people had no say in whether or not they wanted this new world; rather, it is that the majority have not been given the tools to negotiate this new world.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

You Americans, always peering under people's beds to look for communism.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

In a healthy relationship, it is the role of whoever can provide to provide.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

White writers can be blunt about race and get all activist because their anger isn’t threatening

By Anonym 18 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

She felt a sense that things were in order, the way they were meant to be, and that even if they tumbled down once in a while, in the end they would come back together again.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Feminism and femininity are not mutually exclusive. It is misogynistic to suggest that they are.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Some people ask: "Why the word feminist? Why not just say you are a believer in human rights, or something like that?" Because that would be dishonest. Feminism is, of course, part of human rights in general-but to choose to use the vague expression human rights is to deny the specific and particular problem of gender. It would be a way of pretending that it was not women who have, for centuries, been excluded. It would be a way of denying that the problem of gender targets women.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Why must we always talk about race anyway? Can't we just be human beings? And Professor Hunk replied - that is exactly what white privilege is, that you can say that. Race doesn't really exist for you because it has never been a barrier. Black folks don't have that choice.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

If the justification for controlling women's bodies were about women themselves, then it would be understandable. If, for example, the reason was 'women should not wear short skirts because they can get cancer if they do.' Instead the reason is not about women, but about men. Women must be 'covered up' to protect men. I find this deeply dehumanizing because it reduces women to mere props used to manage the appetites of men.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

She felt as if she had somehow failed him and herself by allowing his mother’s behavior to upset her. She should be above it; she should shrug it off as the ranting of a village woman; she should not keep thinking of all the retorts she could have made instead of just standing mutely in that kitchen. But she was upset, and made even more so by Odenigbo's expression, as if he could not believe she was not quite as high-minded as he had thought.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

She rested her head against his and felt, for the first time, what she would often feel with him: a self-affection. He made her like herself. With him, she was at ease; her skin felt as though it was her right size.. It seemed so natural, to talk to him about odd things. She had never done that before. The trust, so sudden and yet so complete, and the intimacy, frightened her.. But now she could think only of all the things she yet wanted to tell him, wanted to do with him.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

How [stories] are told, who tells them, when they’re told, how many stories are told — are really dependent on power.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

He was left-leaning and well-meaning, crippled by his acknowledgement of his own many privileges. He never allowed himself to have an opinion. 'Yes, I see what you mean,' he said often.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

That her relationship with him was like being content in a house but always sitting by the window and looking out

By Anonym 15 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

A father is as much a verb as a mother.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

They are always so quiet," he said, turning to Papa. "So quiet." "They are not like those loud children people are raising these days, with no home training and no fear of God," Papa said, and I was certain that it was pride that stretched Papa's lips and lightened his eyes. "Imagine what the Standard would be if we were all quiet." It was a joke. Ade Coker was laughing; so was his wife, Yewanda. But Papa did not laugh. Jaja and I turned and went back upstairs, silently.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

We're all social beings. We internalize ideas from our socialization.