Best 1 053 of George Orwell quotes - MyQuotes

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George Orwell
By Anonym 13 Sep

George Orwell

I had the lonely child's habit of making up stories and holding conversations with imaginary persons, and I think from the very start my literary ambitions were mixed up with the feeling of being isolated and undervalued. I knew that I had a facility with words and a power of facing unpleasant facts, and I felt that this created a sort of private world in which I could get my own back for my failure in everyday life.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Orwell

Think of something you really care about. Then add hour to hour and calculate the fraction of your life that you've actually spent in doing it. And then calculate the time you've spent on things like shaving, riding to and fro on buses, waiting in railway junctions, swapping dirty stories, and reading the newspapers.

By Anonym 18 Sep

George Orwell

The essential act of war is destruction, not necessarily of human lives, but of the products of human labour. War is a way of shattering to pieces, or pouring into the stratosphere, or sinking in the depths of the sea, materials which might otherwise be used to make the masses too comfortable, and hence, in the long run, too intelligent.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Orwell

A peace that was truly permanent would be the same as a permanent war.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Orwell

It was terribly dangerous to let your thoughts wander when you were in any public place or within range of a telescreen. The smallest thing could give you away. A nervous tic, an unconscious look of anxiety, a habit of muttering to yourself-anything that carried with it the suggestion of abnormality, of having something to hide. In any case, to wear an improper expression on your face ... was itself a punishable offense. There was even a word for it in Newspeak: facecrime.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Orwell

Winston Smith: Does Big Brother exist? O'Brien: Of course he exists. Winston Smith: Does he exist like you or me? O'Brien: You do not exist.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Orwell

Each generation imagines itself to be more intelligent than the one that went before it, and wiser than the one that comes after it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Orwell

Take pleasure in the impact of one sound on another.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Orwell

The upper class desire to remain so, the middle class wish to overthrow the upper class, and the lower class want a classless system.

By Anonym 17 Sep

George Orwell

Moreover [pacifists] do not as a rule condemn violence as such, but only violence used in defence of western countries

By Anonym 19 Sep

George Orwell

Ti rendi conto che il passato, compreso quello più recente, è stato abolito? Se mai sopravvive da qualche parte, è in oggetti concreti e privi di un nome che li definisca, come quel pezzo di vetro. Noi già non sappiamo praticamente nulla della Rivoluzione e degli anni che l'hanno preceduta. Tutti i documenti sono stati distrutti o falsificati, tutti i libri riscritti, tutti i quadri dipinti da capo, tutte le statue, le strade e gli edifici cambiati di nome, tutte le date alterate, e questo processo è ancora in corso, giorno dopo giorno, minuto dopo minuto. La storia si è fermata. Non esiste altro che un eterno presente nel quale il Partito ha sempre ragione.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Orwell

.... And above all, it is your civilization, it is you. However much you hate it or laugh at it, you will never be happy away from it for any length of time

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Orwell

But what a way to do things-never to perform a decent action until you are kicked into it and the rest of the world has ceased to believe that your motives can possibly be honest.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Orwell

The Catholic and the Communist are alike in assuming that an opponent cannot be both honest and intelligent.

By Anonym 16 Sep

George Orwell

He is simply a hole in the air.

By Anonym 18 Sep

George Orwell

Prose consists less and less of words chosen for the sake of their meaning, and more and more of phrases tacked together like the sections of a prefabricated hen-house.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Orwell

Tea is one of the main stays of civilization in this country.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Orwell

Money writes books, money sells them. Give me not righteousness, O Lord, give me money, only money.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Orwell

Pacifism is objectively pro-Fascist

By Anonym 17 Sep

George Orwell

Num mundo no qual todos trabalhassem pouco, tivessem o alimento necessário, vivessem numa casa com banheiro e refrigerador e possuíssem carro ou até avião, a forma mais óbvia e talvez mais importante de desigualdade já teria desaparecido. Desde o momento em que se tornasse geral, a riqueza perderia seu caráter distintivo. Claro, era possível imaginar uma sociedade na qual a riqueza, no sentido de bens e luxos pessoais, fosse distribuída equitativamente, enquanto o poder permanecia nas mãos de uma pequena casta privilegiada. Na prática, porém, uma sociedade desse tipo não poderia permanecer estável por muito tempo. Porque se lazer e segurança fossem desfrutados por todos igualmente, a grande massa de seres humanos que costuma ser embrutecida pela pobreza se alfabetizaria e aprenderia a pensar por si; e depois que isso acontecesse, mais cedo ou mais tarde essa massa se daria conta de que a minoria privilegiada não tinha função nenhuma e acabaria com ela. A longo termo, uma sociedade hierárquica só era possível num mundo de pobreza e ignorância.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Orwell

Sanity was statistical. It was merely a question of learning to think as they thought.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Orwell

If you turn the other cheek, you will get a harder blow on it than you got on the first one. This does not always happen, but it is to be expected, and you ought not to complain if it does happen.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Orwell

And shall I still be allowed to wear ribbons in my mane?" asked Mollie. "Comrade," said Snowball, "those ribbons that you are so devoted to are the badge of slavery. Can you not understand that liberty is worth more than ribbons?" Mollie agreed, but she did not sound very convinced.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Orwell

Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print. Never use a long word where a short one will do. If it is possible to cut a word out always cut it out. Never use the passive voice where you can use the active. Never use a foreign phrase a scientific word or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent. Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Orwell

The four great motives for writing prose are sheer egoism, esthetic enthusiasm, historical impulse, and political purpose.

By Anonym 18 Sep

George Orwell

Quien con­tro­la el pa­sa­do —decía la con­sig­na del Par­ti­do— con­tro­la el fu­tu­ro. Quien con­tro­la el pre­sen­te con­tro­la el pa­sa­do

By Anonym 19 Sep

George Orwell

The sinister fact about literary censorship in England is that it is largely voluntary. Unpopular ideas can be silenced, and inconvenient facts kept dark, without the need for any official ban. Anyone who has lived long in a foreign country will know of instances of sensational items of news — things which on their own merits would get the big headlines-being kept right out of the British press, not because the Government intervened but because of a general tacit agreement that ‘it wouldn’t do’ to mention that particular fact. So far as the daily newspapers go, this is easy to understand. The British press is extremely centralised, and most of it is owned by wealthy men who have every motive to be dishonest on certain important topics. But the same kind of veiled censorship also operates in books and periodicals, as well as in plays, films and radio. At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed that all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to say this, that or the other, but it is ‘not done’ to say it, just as in mid-Victorian times it was ‘not done’ to mention trousers in the presence of a lady. Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with surprising effectiveness. A genuinely unfashionable opinion is almost never given a fair hearing, either in the popular press or in the highbrow periodicals.

By Anonym 16 Sep

George Orwell

It was intended that when Newspeak had been adopted once and for all and Oldspeak forgotten, a heretical thought - that is, a thought diverging from the principles of Ingsoc - should be literally unthinkable, at least so far as thought is dependent on words.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Orwell

You would not make the act of submission which is the price of sanity.

By Anonym 16 Sep

George Orwell

For whom, it suddenly occured to him to wonder, was he writing this diary? For the future, for the unborn.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Orwell

On the whole, human beings want to be good, but not too good, and not quite all the time.

By Anonym 16 Sep

George Orwell

It is difficult to see how Gandhi's methods could be applied in a country where opponents of the regime disappear in the middle of the night and are never heard of again. Without a free press and the right of assembly, it is impossible not merely to appeal to outside opinion, but to bring a mass movement into being, or even to make your intentions known to your adversary. Is there a Gandhi in Russia at this moment? And if there is, what is he accomplishing?

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Orwell

Pessimism is reactionary because it makes the very idea of improving the world impossible.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Orwell

The child thinks of growing old as an almost obscene calamity, which for some mysterious reason will never happen to itself. All who have passed the age of thirty are joyless grotesques, endlessly fussing about things of no importance and staying alive without, so far as the child can see, having anything to live for. Only child life is real life.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Orwell

No doubt alcohol, tobacco, and so forth, are things that a saint must avoid; but sainthood is also a thing that human beings must avoid.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Orwell

He examined the chess problem and set out the pieces. It was a tricky ending, involving a couple of knights. 'White to play and mate in two moves.' Winston looked up at the portrait of Big Brother. White always mates, he thought with a sort of cloudy mysticism. Always, without exception, it is so arranged. In no chess problem since the beginning of the world has black ever won. Did it not symbolize the eternal, unvarying triumph of Good over Evil? The huge face gazed back at him, full of calm power. White always mates.

By Anonym 18 Sep

George Orwell

The greatest enemy of clear language is insincerity.

By Anonym 16 Sep

George Orwell

It appeared that even in Barcelona there were hardly any bullfights nowadays; for some reason all the best matadors were Fascists.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Orwell

The atom bombs are piling up in the factories, the police are prowling through the cities, the lies are streaming from the loudspeakers, but the earth is still going round the sun.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Orwell

England is perhaps the only great country whose intellectuals are ashamed of their own nationality. In left-wing circles it is always felt that there is something slightly disgraceful in being an Englishman and that it is a duty to snigger at every English institution, from horse racing to suet puddings. It is a strange fact, but it is unquestionably true that almost any English intellectual would feel more ashamed of standing to attention during God save the King than of stealing from a poor box.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Orwell

A scrupulous writer, in every sentence that he writes, will ask himself at least four questions, thus: 1. What am I trying to say? 2. What words will express it? 3. What image or idiom will make it clearer? 4. Is this image fresh enough to have an effect?

By Anonym 16 Sep

George Orwell

He seemed to be lying on the bed. He could not see very well. Her youthful, rapacious face, with blackened eyebrows, leaned over him as he sprawled there. “‘How about my present?’ she demanded, half wheedling, half menacing. “Never mind that now. To work! Come here. Not a bad mouth. Come here. Come closer. Ah! “No. No use. Impossible. The will but not the way. The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak. Try again. No. The booze, it must be. See Macbeth. One last try. No, no use. Not this evening, I’m afraid. “All right, Dora, don’t you worry. You’ll get your two quid all right. We aren’t paying by results. “He made a clumsy gesture. ‘Here, give us that bottle. That bottle off the dressing-table.’ “Dora brought it. Ah, that’s better. That at least doesn’t fail.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Orwell

One cannot really be a Catholic and grown up.

By Anonym 16 Sep

George Orwell

It is bound to be a failure, every book is a failure, but I do know with some clarity what kind of book I want to write.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Orwell

All nationalistic distinctions - all claims to be better than somebody else because you have a different-shaped skull or speak a different dialect - are entirely spurious, but they are important so long as people believe in them.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Orwell

At present nothing is possible except to extend the area of sanity little by little. We cannot act collectively. We can only spread our knowledge outwards from individual to individual, generation after generation.

By Anonym 17 Sep

George Orwell

Ništa nije tvoje vlastito osim nekoliko kubičnih centimetara u tvojoj lubanji.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Orwell

Man is the only creature that consumes without producing

By Anonym 20 Sep

George Orwell

With its grace and carelessness, it seemed to annihilate a whole culture, a whole system of thought, as though [all] could be swept into a nothingness by a single splendid movement of the arm.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Orwell

Even through the shut window pane, the world looked cold.