Best 792 of Theodore Roosevelt quotes - MyQuotes

Follow
Theodore Roosevelt
By Anonym 14 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

Never trust a man who says he is only a little crooked, and that the crookedness is exercised in your interest.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

The absence of effective State, and, especially, national, restraint upon unfair money-getting has tended to create a small class of enormously wealthy and economically powerful men, whose chief object is to hold and increase their power. The prime need is to change the conditions which enable these men to accumulate power which is not for the general welfare that they should hold or exercise. We grudge no man a fortune which represents his own power and sagacity, when exercised with entire regard to the welfare of his fellows.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

There can be no life without change, and to be afraid of what is different or unfamiliar is to be afraid of life.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

There are dreadful moments when death comes very near those we love, even if for the time being it passes by. But life is a great adventure, and the worst of all fears is the fear of living.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

Men with the muckrake are often indispensable to the well-being of society, but only if they know when to stop raking the muck.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

The immigrant must not be allowed to drift or to be put at the mercy of the exploiter. Our object is not to imitate one of the older racial types, but to maintain a new American type and then to secure loyalty to this type. We cannot secure such loyalty unless we make this a country where men shall feel that they have justice and also where they shall feel that they are required to perform the duties imposed upon them.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

The first duty of an American citizen, then, is that he shall work in politics.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

We cannot afford to differ on the question of honesty if we expect our republic permanently to endure. Honesty is not so much a credit as an absolute prerequisite to efficient service to the public. Unless a man is honest, we have no right to keep him in public life; it matters not how brilliant his capacity.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

Black care rarely sits behind the rider whose pace is fast enough.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

I wish to preach not the doctrine of ignoble ease but the doctrine of the strenuous life; the life of toil and effort; of labour and strife; to preach that highest form of success which comes not to the man who desires mere easy peace but to the man who does not shrink from danger, from hardship, or from bitter toil, and who out of these wins the splendid ultimate triumph. A life of ignoble ease, a life of that peace which springs merely from lack either of desire or of power to strive after great things, is as little worthy of a nation as of an individual.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

I hold that in this country there must be complete severance of Church and State; that public moneys shall not be used for the purpose of advancing any particular creed; and therefore that the public schools shall be nonsectarian and no public moneys appropriated for sectarian schools.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

Gradually the true Mason gains experience in using these working tools and can observe subtler and subtler indications of personal flaws.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

There is superstition in science quite as much as there is superstition in theology, and it is all the more dangerous because those suffering from it are profoundly convinced that they are freeing themselves from all superstition.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

Because we are unqualifiedly and without reservation against any system of denominational schools, maintained by the adherents of any creed with the help of state aid, therefore, we as strenuously insist that the public schools shall be free from sectarian influences, and above all, free from any attitude of hostility to the adherents of any particular creed.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

There are two things that I want you to make up your minds to: first, that you are going to have a good time as long as you live - I have no use for the sour-faced man - and next, that you are going to do something worthwhile, that you are going to work hard and do the things you set out to do.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

Every child has inside him an aching void for excitement and if we don't fill it with something which is exciting and interesting and good for him, he will fill it with something which is exciting and interesting and which isn't good for him.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

We have room but for one Language here and that is the English Language, for we intend to see that the crucible turns our people out as Americans of American nationality and not as dwellers in a polyglot boarding-house.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

I can no more explain why I like "natural history" than why I like California canned peaches; nor why I do not care for that enormous brand of natural history which deals with invertebrates any more than why I do not care for brandied peaches. All I can say is that almost as soon as I began to read at all I began to like to read about the natural history of beasts and birds and the more formidable or interesting reptiles and fishes.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

For us is the life of action, of strenuous performance of duty; let us live in the harness, striving mightily; let us rather run the risk of wearing out than rusting out.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

We wish to control big business so as to secure among other things good wages for the wage-workers and reasonable prices for the consumers. Wherever in any business the prosperity of the business man is obtained by lowering the wages of his workmen and charging an excessive price to the consumers we wish to interfere and stop such practices. We will not submit to that kind of prosperity any more than we will submit to prosperity obtained by swindling investors or getting unfair advantages over business rivals.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

It is not the critic who counts...The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

Bodily vigor is good, and vigor of intellect is even better, but far above is character.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

We stand for a living wage. Wages are subnormal if they fail to provide a living for those who devote their time and energy to industrial occupations. The monetary equivalent of a living wage varies according to local conditions, but must include enough to secure the elements of a normal standard of living-a standard high enough to make morality possible, to provide for education and recreation, to care for immature members of the family, to maintain the family during periods of sickness, and to permit of reasonable saving for old age.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

The president is that invisible force that makes a school of fish suddenly change direction, so that everyone 'ohhs' and 'ahhs' at the glimmering mass and only later wonders what makes them move in that way. I read somewhere-_Harper's_, I'm fairly certain-that the fish are only avoiding pockets of extra cold water.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

No other President ever enjoyed the Presidency as I did.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

I have had a great time as president.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

[Among the books he chooses, a statesman] ought to read interesting books on history and government, and books of science and philosophy; and really good books on these subjects are as enthralling as any fiction ever written in prose or verse.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

There is need of a sound body, and even more need of a sound mind. But above mind and above body stands character-the sum of those qualities which we mean when we speak of a man's force and courage, of his good faith and sense of honor.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

The weakling and the coward cannot be saved by honesty alone; but without honesty the brave and able man is merely a civic wild beast who should be hunted down by every lover of righteousness. No man who is corrupt, no man who condones corruption in others, can possibly do his duty by the community.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

And to lose the chance to see frigatebirds soaring in circles above the storm, or a file of pelicans winging their way homeward across the crimson afterglow of the sunset, or a myriad terns flashing in the bright light of midday as they hover in a shifting maze above the beach -- why, the loss is like the loss of a gallery of the masterpieces of the artists of old time.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

The great man is always the man of mighty effort.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

All the resources we need are in the mind.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

Laws are essential emanations from the self-poised character of God; they radiate from the sun to the circling edge of creation. Verily, the mighty Lawgiver hath subjected himself unto laws.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

If you've got them by the balls, their hearts and minds will follow.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

„Fă ce poți cu ce ai, acolo unde ești.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

My power vanishes into thin air the instant that my fellow citizens, who are straight and honest, cease to believe that I represent them and fight for what is straight and honest. That is all the strength that I have.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

Death is always, under all circumstances, a tragedy, for if it is not then it means that life has become one.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

You cannot create prosperity by law. Sustained thrift, industry, application, intelligence, are the only things that ever do, or ever will, create prosperity. But you can very easily destroy prosperity by law.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

No people on earth have more cause to be thankful than ours, and this is said reverently, in no spirit of boastfulness in our own strength, but with the gratitude to the Giver of good who has blessed us.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

Death by violence, death by cold, death by starvation - they are the normal endings of the stately creatures of the wilderness. The sentimentalists who prattle about the peaceful life of nature do not realize its utter mercilessness.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

This country has nothing to fear from the crooked man who fails. We put him in jail. It is the crooked man who succeeds who is a threat to this country.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

Work hard at work worth doing.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

Books are the ammunition of life.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

Among the wise and high-minded people who in self-respecting and genuine fashion strive earnestly for peace, there are the foolish fanatics always to be found in such a movement and always discrediting it the men who form the lunatic fringe in all reform movements.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

I have a perfect horror of words that are not backed up by deeds.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

I do. That is character!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

There is but one answer to terrorism and it is best delivered with a Winchester rifle.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

It is of little use for us to pay lip-loyalty to the mighty men of the past unless we sincerely endeavor to apply to the problems of the present precisely the qualities which in other crises enabled the men of that day to meet those crises.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

The poorest way to face life is to face it with a sneer. There are many men who feel a kind of twister pride in cynicism; there are many who confine themselves to criticism of the way others do what they themselves dare not even attempt. There is no more unhealthy being, no man less worthy of respect, than he who either really holds, or feigns to hold, an attitude of sneering disbelief toward all that is great and lofty, whether in achievement or in that noble effort which, even if it fails, comes to second achievement. A cynical habit of thought and speech, a readiness to criticise work which the critic himself never tries to perform, an intellectual aloofness which will not accept contact with life’s realities — all these are marks, not as the possessor would fain to think, of superiority but of weakness. They mark the men unfit to bear their part painfully in the stern strife of living, who seek, in the affection of contempt for the achievements of others, to hide from others and from themselves in their own weakness. The role is easy; there is none easier, save only the role of the man who sneers alike at both criticism and performance.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Theodore Roosevelt

I always believe in going hard at everything, whether it is Latin or mathematics, boxing or football, but at the same time I want to keep the sense of proportion. It is never worth while to absolutely exhaust one's self or to take big chances unless for an adequate object. I want you to keep in training the faculties which would make you, if the need arose, able to put your last ounce of pluck and strength into a contest. But I do not want you to squander these qualities.