Best 387 of Alexander Hamilton quotes - MyQuotes

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Alexander Hamilton
By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

In the main it will be found that a power over a man's support [salary] is a power over his will.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The scheme of separate confederacies, which will always multiply the chances of ambition, will be a never failing bait to all such influential characters in the State administrations as are capable of preferring their own emolument and advancement to the public weal.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

Tyranny has perhaps oftener grown out of the assumptions of power, called for, on pressing exigencies, by a defective constitution, than out of the full exercise of the largest constitutional authorities.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The citizens of America have too much discernment to be argued into anarchy. And I am much mistaken, if experience has not wrought a deep and solemn conviction in the public mind, that greater energy of government is essential to the welfare and prosperity of the community

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

It is far more rational to suppose that the courts were designed to be an intermediate body between the people and the legislature, in order, among other things, to keep the latter within the limits assigned to their authority.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

As to religion a moderate stock will satisfy me. She must believe in god and hate a saint.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

While property continues to be pretty equally divided, and a considerable share of information pervades the community; the tendency of the people's suffrages, will be to elevate merit even from obscurity. As riches increase and accumulate in few hands; as luxury prevails in society; virtue will be in a greater degree considered as only a graceful appendage of wealth, and the tendency of things will be to depart from the republican standard.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

As to Taxes, they are evidently inseparable from Government. It is impossible without them to pay the debts of the nation, to protect it from foreign danger, or to secure individuals from lawless violence and rapine.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The people are turbulent and changing; they seldom judge right or make good decision.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

It is a singular advantage of taxes on articles of consumption that they contain in their own nature a security against excess. They prescribe their own limit, which cannot be exceeded without defeating the end purposed - that is, an extension of the revenue.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The instrument by which it [government] must act are either the AUTHORITY of the laws or FORCE. If the first be destroyed, the last must be substituted; and where this becomes the ordinary instrument of government there is an end to liberty!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

In the general course of human nature, A power over a man's subsistence amounts to a power over his will.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The idea of governing at all times by the simple force of law (which we have been told is the only admissible principle of republican government) has no place but in the reveries of those political doctors whose sagacity disdains the admonitions of experimental instruction.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

To look for a continuation in harmony between a number of independent unconnected sovereignties, situated in the same neighborhood, would be to disregard the uniform course of human events, and to set at defiance the accumulated experience of ages.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The truth is, after all the declamations we have heard, that the Constitution is itself, in every rational sense, and to every useful purpose, A BILL OF RIGHTS.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The sacred rights of mankind are not to be rummaged for among old parchments or musty records. They are written, as with a sunbeam, in the whole volume of human nature, by the Hand of Divinity itself, and can never be erased or obscured by mortal power.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

It is evident from the state of the country, from the habits of the people, from the experience we have had on the point itself, that it is impracticable to raise any very considerable sums by direct taxation.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The true principle of government is this - make the system compleat in its structure; give a perfect proportion and balance to its parts; and the powers you give it will never affect your security.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The State governments possess inherent advantages, which will ever give them an influence and ascendancy over the National Government, and will for ever preclude the possibility of federal encroachments. That their liberties, indeed, can be subverted by the federal head, is repugnant to every rule of political calculation.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

But might not his [the president's] nomination be overruled? I grant it might, yet this could only be to make place for another nomination by himself. The person ultimately appointed must be object of his preference, though perhaps not in the first degree. It is also not very probable that his nomination would often be overruled.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

A national debt, if it is not excessive, will be to us a national blessing.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The constitution of human nature" teaches us not to expect "that the persons, entrusted with the administration of the affairs of the particular members of a confederacy, will at all times be ready, with perfect good humor, and an unbiased regard to the public weal, to execute the resolutions of decrees of the general authority." "This tendency is not difficult to be accounted for," Publius argues, "It has its origin in the love of power.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The prosperity of commerce is now perceived and acknowledged by all enlightened statesmen to be the most useful as well as the most productive source of national wealth, and has accordingly become a primary object of their political cares.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

After an unequivocal experience of the inefficacy of the subsisting federal government, you are called upon to deliberate on a new Constitution for the United States of America.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

Has it not. . . invariably been found that momentary passions, and immediate interests, have a more active and imperious control over human conduct than general or remote considerations of policy, utility and justice?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

An over-scrupulous jealousy of danger to the rights of the people, which is more commonly the fault of the head than of the heart, will be represented as mere pretense and artifice, the stale bait for popularity at the expense of the public good.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

When the sword is once drawn, the passions of men observe no bounds of moderation.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

Even to observe neutrality you must have a strong government.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

A powerful, victorious ally is yet another name for master.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

[In the event of war, Americans would] resort for repose and security to institutions which have a tendency to destroy their civil and political rights. To be more safe they, at length, become willing to run the risk of being less free.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The rights of neutrality will only be respected when they are defended by an adequate power. A nation, despicable by its weakness, forfeits even the privilege of being neutral.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

Has it been found that bodies of men act with more rectitude or greater disinterestedness than individuals? The contrary of this has been inferred by all accurate observers of the conduct of mankind; and the inference is founded upon obvious reasons. Regard to reputation has a less active influence, when the infamy of a bad action is to be divided among a number than when it is to fall singly upon one.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

As the duties of superintending the national defense and of securing the public peace against foreign or domestic violence involve a provision for casualties and dangers to which no possible limits can be assigned, the power of making that provision ought to know no other bounds than the exigencies of the nation and the resources of the community.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The Convention probably foresaw what it has been a principal aim of these papers to inculcate that the danger which most threatens our political welfare is, that the state governments will finally sap the foundations of the Union.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The laws of certain states . . . give an ownership in the service of Negroes as personal property . . . . But being men, by the laws of God and nature, they were capable of acquiring liberty - and when the captor in war . . . thought fit to give them liberty, the gift was not only valid, but irrevocable.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The representatives of the people, in a popular assembly, seem sometimes to fancy that they are the people themselves, and betray strong symptoms of impatience and disgust at the least sign of opposition from any other quarter; as if the exercise of its rights, by either the executive or judiciary, were a breach of their privilege and an outrage to their dignity.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

It is presumable that no country will be able to borrow of foreigners upon better terms than the United States, because none can, perhaps, afford so good security.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The experience of past ages may inform us, that when the circumstances of a people render them distressed, their rulers generally recur to severe, cruel, and oppressive measures. Instead of endeavoring to establish their authority in the affection of their subjects, they think they have no security but in their fear.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

[S]ound policy condemns the practice of accumulating debts.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

A fondness for power is implanted in most men, and it is natural to abuse it when acquired.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The increasing remoteness of consanguinity is everyday diminishing the force of the family compact between France and Spain. And politicians have ever with great reason considered the ties of blood as feeble and precarious links of political connection.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

It is a general principle of human nature, that a man will be interested in whatever he possesses, in proportion to the firmness or precariousness of the tenure by which he holds it; will be less attached to what he holds by a momentary or uncertain title, than to what he enjoys by a durable or certain title; and, of course, will be willing to risk more for the sake of the one, than for the sake of the other.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

If we set out with... a scrupulous regard to the Constitution, the government will acquire a spirit and a tone productive of permanent blessings to the community. If on the contrary,... the Constitution is slighted, or explained away, upon every frivolous pretext, the future of government will be feeble, distracted and arbitrary. The rights of the subjects will be the sport of every party vicissitude. There will be no settled rule of conduct, but everything will fluctuate with the alternate prevalency of contending factions.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The complete independence of the courts of justice is peculiarly essential in a limited Constitution. By a limited Constitution, I understand one which contains certain specified exceptions to the legislative authority. Limitations of this kind can be preserved in practice no other way than through the medium of courts of justice, whose duty it must be to declare all acts contrary to the manifest tenor of the Constitution void. Without this, all the reservations of particular rights or privileges would amount to nothing.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The changes in the human condition are uncertain and frequent. Many, on whom fortune has bestowed her favours, may trace their family to a more unprosperous station; and many who are now in obscurity, may look back upon the affluence and exalted rank of their ancestors.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

There was a time when we were told . . . that a sense of common interest would preside over the conduct of the respective members...This language at the present day would appear as wild as that great part of what we now hear from the same quarter will be thought, when we shall have received further lessons from that best oracle of wisdom, experience.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

What plan for the regulation of the militia may be pursued by the national government is impossible to be foreseen...The project of disciplining all the militia of the United States is as futile as it would be injurious if it were capable of being carried into execution... Little more can reasonably be aimed at with the respect to the people at large than to have them properly armed and equipped ; and in order to see that this be not neglected, it will be necessary to assemble them once or twice in the course of a year.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

Every power vested in a government is in its nature sovereign, and includes by force of the term a right to employ all the means requisite . . . to the attainment of the ends of such power.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

In disquisitions of every kind there are certain primary truths, or first principles, upon which all subsequent reasoning must depend.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The superiority...enjoyed by nations that have...perfected a branch of industry, constitutes a...formidable obstacle.