Best 62 of Werner Heisenberg quotes - MyQuotes

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Werner Heisenberg
By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

The more precise the measurement of position, the more imprecise the measurement of momentum, and vice versa.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

The world thus appears as a complicated tissue of events, in which connections of different kinds alternate or overlap or combine and thereby determine the texture of the whole.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

The physicist may be satisfied when he has the mathematical scheme and knows how to use for the interpretation of the experiments. But he has to speak about his results also to non-physicists who will not be satisfied unless some explanation is given in plain language. Even for the physicist the description in plain language will be the criterion of the degree of understanding that has been reached.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

After the conversations about Indian philosophy, some of the ideas of Quantum Physics that had seemed so crazy suddenly made much more sense.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

Whether we like it or not, modern ways are going to alter and in part destroy traditional customs and values.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

Science clears the fields on which technology can build.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

Thus, the more precisely the position is determined, the less precisely the momentum is known, and conversely.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

Whether we electrons, light quanta, benzol molecules, or stones, we shall always come up against these two characteristics, the corpuscular and the undular.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

[T]he atoms or elementary particles themselves are not real; they form a world of potentialities or possibilities rather than one of things or facts.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

The incomplete knowledge of a system must be an essential part of every formulation in quantum theory. Quantum theoretical laws must be of a statistical kind. To give an example: we know that the radium atom emits alpha-radiation. Quantum theory can give us an indication of the probability that the alpha-particle will leave the nucleus in unit time, but it cannot predict at what precise point in time the emission will occur, for this is uncertain in principle.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

The problems of language here are really serious. We wish to speak in some way about the structure of the atoms. But we cannot speak about atoms in ordinary language.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

Natural science, does not simply describe and explain nature; it is part of the interplay between nature and ourselves

By Anonym 14 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

It is probably true quite generally that in the history of human thinking the most fruitful developments frequently take place at those points where two different lines of thought meet. These lines may have their roots in quite different parts of human nature, in different times or different cultural environments or different religious traditions: hence if they actually meet, that is, if they are at least so much related to each other that a real interaction can take place, then one may hope that new and interesting developments may follow.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

The exact sciences also start from the assumption that in the end it will always be possible to understand nature, even in every new field of experience, but that we may make no a priori assumptions about the meaning of the word understand.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

What we observe is not nature itself but nature exposed to our method of questioning. Our scientific work in physics consists in asking questions about nature in the language that we possess and trying to get an answer from experiment by the means that are at our disposal.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

There is a fundamental error in separating the parts from the whole, the mistake of atomizing what should not be atomized. Unity and complementarity constitute reality.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

We will have to abandon the philosophy of Democritus and the concept of elementary particles. We should accept instead the concept of elementary symmetries.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

Even for the physicist the description in plain language will be a criterion of the degree of understanding that has been reached.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

Nature allows only experimental situations to occur which can be described within the framework of the formalism of quantum mechanics

By Anonym 13 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

An expert is someone who knows some of the worst mistakes that can be made in his subject and how to avoid them.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

Modern physics has changed nothing in the great classical disciplines of, for instance, mechanics, optics, and heat. Only the conception of hitherto unexplored regions, formed prematurely from a knowledge of only certain parts of the world, has undergone a decisive transformation. This conception, however, is always decisive for the future course of research.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

Science no longer is in the position of observer of nature, but rather recognizes itself as part of the interplay between man and nature. The scientific method ... changes and transforms its object: the procedure can no longer keep its distance from the object.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

In my paper the fact the XY was not equal to YX was very disagreeable to me. I felt this was the only point of difficulty in the whole scheme...and I was not able to solve it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

The solution of the difficulty is that the two mental pictures which experiment lead us to form - the one of the particles, the other of the waves - are both incomplete and have only the validity of analogies which are accurate only in limiting cases.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

Can quantum mechanics represent the fact that an electron finds itself approximately in a given place and that it moves approximately with a given velocity, and can we make these approximations so close that they do not cause experimental difficulties?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

By getting to smaller and smaller units, we do not come to fundamental or indivisible units. But we do come to a point where further division has no meaning.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

The conception of objective reality ... has thus evaporated ... into the transparent clarity of mathematics that represents no longer the behavior of particles but rather our knowledge of this behavior.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

In the strict formulation of the law of causality—if we know the present, we can calculate the future—it is not the conclusion that is wrong but the premise. On an implication of the uncertainty principle.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

The existing scientific concepts cover always only a very limited part of reality, and the other part that has not yet been understood is infinite.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

"Uncertainty" is NOT "I don't know." It is "I can't know." "I am uncertain" does not mean "I could be certain.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

It will never be possible by pure reason to arrive at some absolute truth.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

...separation of the observer from the phenomenon to be observed is no longer possible.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

If we wanted to construct a basic philosophical attitude from these scientific utterances of Pauli's, at first we would be inclined to infer from them an extreme rationalism and a fundamentally skeptical point of view. In reality however, behind this outward display of criticism and skepticism lay concealed a deep philosophical interest even in those dark areas of reality of the human mind which elude the grasp of reason. And while the power of fascination emanating from Pauli's analyses of physical problems was admittedly due in some measure to the detailed and penetrating clarity of his formulations, the rest was derived from a constant contact with the field of creative processes, for which no rational formulation as yet exists.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

Here the attention of the research workers is primarily directed to the problem of reconciling the claims of the special relativity theory with those of the quantum theory. The extraordinary advances made in this field by Dirac ... leave open the question whether it will be possible to satisfy the claims of the two theories without at the same time determining the Sommerfeld fine-structure constant.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

The discontinuous 'reduction of the wave packets' which cannot be derived from Schroedinger's equation is ... a consequence of the transition from the possible to the actual.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

In general, scientific progress calls for no more than the absorption and elaboration of new ideas- and this is a call most scientists are happy to heed.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

I am firmly convinced that we must never judge political movements by their aims, no matter how loudly proclaimed or how sincerely upheld, but only by the means they use to realize these aims.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

Quantum theory provides us with a striking illustration of the fact that we can fully understand a connection though we can only speak of it in images and parables.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

Therefore, the two processes, that of science and that of art, are not very different. Both science and art form in the course of the centuries a human language by which we can speak about the more remote parts of reality, and the coherent sets of concepts as well as the different styles of art are different words or groups of words in this language.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

The violent reaction on the recent development of modern physics can only be understood when one realises that here the foundations of physics have started moving; and that this motion has caused the feeling that the ground would be cut from science

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

When I meet God, I am going to ask him two questions: Why relativity ? And why turbulence ? I really believe he will have an answer for the first.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

The positivists have a simple solution: the world must be divided into that which we can say clearly and the rest, which we had better pass over in silence. But can anyone conceive of a more pointless philosophy, seeing that what we can say clearly amounts to next to nothing? If we omitted all that is unclear, we would probably be left completely uninteresting and trivial tautologies.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

It was about three o'clock at night when the final result of the calculation [which gave birth to quantum mechanics] lay before me ... At first I was deeply shaken ... I was so excited that I could not think of sleep. So I left the house ... and awaited the sunrise on top of a rock.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

The structure underlying the phenomena is not given by material objects like the atoms of Democritus but by the form that determines the material objects. The Ideas are more fundamental than the objects.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

The ontology of materialism rested upon the illusion that the kind of existence, the direct "actuality" of the world around us, can be extrapolated into the atomic range. This extrapolation is impossible, however.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

Nonsense. Space is blue and birds fly through it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

Every tool carries with it the spirit by which it has been created.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

The 'path' comes into existence only when we observe it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

The basic idea is to shove all fundamental difficulties onto the neutron and to do quantum mechanics in the nucleus.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Werner Heisenberg

I believe that the existence of the classical "path" can be pregnantly formulated as follows: The "path" comes into existence only when we observe it.