Best 382 of Immanuel Kant quotes - MyQuotes

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Immanuel Kant
By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Animals... are there merely as a means to an end. That end is man.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Art is purposiveness without purpose.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Immanuel Kant

The human heart refuses To believe in a universe Without a purpose.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Freedom is the alone unoriginated birthright of man, and belongs to him by force of his humanity.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Men will not understand ... that when they fulfil their duties to men, they fulfil thereby God's commandments; that they are consequently always in the service of God, as long as their actions are moral, and that it is absolutely impossible to serve God otherwise.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Reason must approach nature in order to be taught by it. It must not, however, do so in the character of a pupil who listens to everything that the teacher chooses to say, but of an appointed judge who compels the witness to answer questions which he has himself formulated.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

I ought never to act except in such a way that I could also will that my maxim should become a universal law.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

A science of all these possible kinds of space [the higher dimensional ones] would undoubtedly be the highest enterprise which a finite understanding could undertake in the field of geometry... If it is possible that there could be regions with other dimensions, it is very likely that God has somewhere brought them into being.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Act in such a way that you treat humanity, whether in your own person or in the person of any other, never merely as a means to an end, but always at the same time as an end.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Enlightenment is man's leaving his self-caused immaturity. Immaturity is the incapacity to use one's intelligence without the guidance of another. Such immaturity is self-caused if it is not caused by lack of intelligence, but by lack of determination and courage to use one's intelligence without being guided by another. Sapere Aude! Have the courage to use your own intelligence! is therefore the motto of the enlightenment.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

In all judgements by which we describe anything as beautiful, we allow no one to be of another opinion.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Immanuel Kant

The principle of private happiness, however, is the most objectionable, not merely because it is false, and experience contradicts the supposition that prosperity is always proportioned to good conduct, nor yet merely because it contributes nothing to the establishment of morality - since it is quite a different thing to make a prosperous man and a good man, or to make one prudent and sharp-sighted for his own interests, and to make him virtuous - but because the springs it provides for morality are such as rather undermine it and destroy its sublimity, since they put the motives to virtue and to vice in the same class, and only teach us to make a better calculation, the specific difference between virtue and vice being entirely extinguished. On the other hand, as to moral being, this supposed special sense, the appeal to it is indeed superficial when those who cannot think believe that feeling will help them out, even in what concerns general laws; and besides, feelings which naturally differ infinitely in degree cannot furnish a uniform standard of good and evil, nor has anyone a right to form judgments for others by his own feelings...

By Anonym 15 Sep

Immanuel Kant

The more we come in contact with animals and observe their behaviour, the more we love them, for we see how great is their care of the young.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Immaturity is the incapacity to use one's intelligence without the guidance of another.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Enlightenment is man's emergence from his self-incurred immaturity.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Both love of mankind, and respect for their rights are duties; the former however is only a conditional, the latter an unconditional, purely imperative duty, which he must be perfectly certain not to have transgressed who would give himself up to the secret emotions arising from benevolence.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Dare to know! Have the courage to use your own intelligence!

By Anonym 14 Sep

Immanuel Kant

The evil effect of science upon men is principally this, that by far the greatest number of those who wish to display a knowledge of it accomplish no improvement at all of the understanding, but only a perversity of it, not to mention that it serves most of them as a tool of vanity.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

All natural capacities of a creature are destined to evolve completely to their natural end.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Immanuel Kant

[A man], who is in prosperity, while he sees that others have to contend with great wretchedness and that he could help them, thinks: What concern is it of mine? Let everyone be as happy as Heaven pleases, or as he can make himself; I will take nothing from him nor even envy him, only I do not wish to contribute anything to his welfare or to his assistance in distress! Now no doubt, if such a mode of thinking were a universal law, the human race might very well subsist, and doubtless even better than in a state in which everyone talks of sympathy and good-will, or even takes care occasionally to put it into practice, but, on the other side, also cheats when he can, betrays the rights of men, or otherwise violates them. But although it is possible that a universal law of nature might exist in accordance with that maxim, it is impossible to will that such a principle should have the universal validity of a law of nature. For a will which resolved this would contradict itself, inasmuch as many cases might occur in which one would have need of the love and sympathy of others, and in which, by such a law of nature, sprung from his own will, he would deprive himself of all hope of the aid he desires.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Immanuel Kant

It is by his activities and not by enjoyment that man feels he is alive. In idleness we not only feel that life is fleeting, but we also feel lifeless.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Things which we see are not by themselves what we see ... It remains completely unknown to us what the objects may be by themselves and apart from the receptivity of our senses. We know nothing but our manner of perceiving them.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Seek not the favor of the multitude; it is seldom got by honest and lawful means. But seek the testimony of few; and number not voices, but weigh them.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Immanuel Kant

[R]eason is... given to us as a practical faculty, that is, as one that influences the will.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Enlightenment is man's emergence from his self-imposed nonage. Nonage is the inability to use one's own understanding without another's guidance. This nonage is self-imposed if its cause lies not in lack of understanding but in indecision and lack of courage to use one's own mind without another's guidance. Dare to know!

By Anonym 14 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Prudence approaches, conscience accuses.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Immanuel Kant

We ourselves introduce that order and regularity in the appearance which we entitle "nature". We could never find them in appearances had we not ourselves, by the nature of our own mind, originally set them there.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Simply to acquiesce in skepticism can never suffice to overcome the restlessness of reason.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Is it reasonable to assume a purposiveness in all the parts of nature and to deny it to the whole?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Con las piedras que con duro intento los críticos te lanzan, bien puedes erigirte un monumento.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Immanuel Kant

If I have a book that thinks for me, a pastor who acts as my conscience, a physician who prescribes my diet, and so on... then I have no need to exert myself. I have no need to think, if only I can pay; others will take care of that disagreeable business for me.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing admiration and awe, the oftener and more steadily we reflect on them: the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

I am an investigator by inclination. I feel a great thirst for knowledge.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

cruelty to animals is contrary to man's duty to himself, because it deadens in him the feeling of sympathy for their sufferings, and thus a natural tendency that is very useful to morality in relation to other human beings is weakened.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Immanuel Kant

A good will is good not because of what it performs or effects, not by its aptness for the attainment of some proposed end, but simply by virtue of the volition - that is, it is good in itself, and considered by itself is to be esteemed much higher than all that can be brought about by it in favor of any inclination, nay, even of the sum-total of all inclinations... like a jewel, it would still shine by its own light, as a thing which has its whole value in itself.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Space is only the form of external intuition, and not a real object that could be perceived externally, nor is it a correlate of phenomena, but the form of phenomena themselves. Space, therefore, cannot exist absolutely (by itself) as something determining the existence of things, because it is no object, but only the form of possible objects. Things, therefore, as phenomenal, may indeed determine space, that is, impart reality to one or other of its predicates (quality and relation); but space, on the other side, as something existing by itself, cannot determine the reality of things in regard to quantity or form, because it is nothing real in itself.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Great minds think for themselves.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Nature, when left to universal laws, tends to produce regularity out of chaos.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Even a man's exact imitation of the song of the nightingale displeases us when we discover that it is a mimicry, and not the nightingale.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Immanuel Kant

But, though all our knowledge begins with experience, it by no means follows that all arises out of experience.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Immanuel Kant

The ideal of the supreme being is nothing but a regulative principle of reason which directs us to look upon all connection in the world as if it originated from an all-sufficient necessary cause.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Ingratitude is the essence of vileness.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Thus he has two standpoints from which he can consider himself...: first, as belonging to the world of sense, under the laws of nature (heteronomy), and, second, as belonging to the intelligible world under laws which, independent of nature, are not empirical but founded only on reason.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Immanuel Kant

On the other hand, the moral law, although it gives no such prospect, does provide a fact absolutely inexplicable from any data of the world of sense or from the whole compass of the theoretical use of reason, and this fact points to a pure intelligible world―indeed, it defines it positively and enable us to know something of it, namely a law. This law gives to the sensible world, as sensuous nature (as this concerns rational beings), the form of an intelligible world, i.e., the form of supersensuous nature, without interfering with the mechanism of the former. Nature, in the widest sense of the word, is the existence of things under laws. The sensuous nature of rational beings in general is their existence under empirically conditioned laws, and therefore it is, from the point of view of reason, heteronomy. The supersensuous nature of the same beings, on the other hand, is their existence according to laws which are independent of all empirical conditions and which therefore belong to the autonomy of pure reason. And since the laws, according to which the existence of things depends on cognition, are practical, supersensuous nature, so far as we can form a concept of it, is nothing else than nature under the autonomy of the pure practical reason. The law of this autonomy is the moral law, and it, therefore, is the fundamental law of supersensuous nature and of a pure world of the understanding, whose counterpart must exist in the world of sense without interfering with the laws of the latter. The former could be called the archetypal world (*natura archetypa*) which we know only by reason; the latter, on the other hand, could be called the ectypal world (*natura ectypa*), because it contains the possible effect of the idea of the former as the determining ground of the will." ―from_Critique of Practical Reason_. Translated, with an Introduction by Lewis White Beck, p. 44.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Happiness, though an indefinite concept, is the goal of all rational beings

By Anonym 13 Sep

Immanuel Kant

In law a man is guilty when he violates the rights of others. In ethics he is guilty if he only thinks of doing so.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Immanuel Kant

That all our knowledge begins with experience there can be no doubt. For how should the faculty of knowledge be called into activity, if not by objects which affect our senses and which, on the one hand, produce representations by themselves or on the other, rouse the activity of our understanding to compare, connect, or separate them and thus to convert the raw material of our sensible impressions into knowledge of objects, which we call experience? With respect to time, therefore, no knowledge within us is antecedent to experience, but all knowledge begins with it. But though all our knowledge begins with experience, is does not follow that it all arises from experience. For it is quite possible that even our empirical knowledge is a compound of that which we perceive through impressions, and of that which our own faculty of knowledge (incited by sense impressions) supplies from itself, a supplement which we do not distinguish from that raw material until long practice and rendered us capable of separating one from the other. It is therefore a question which deserves at least closer investigation and cannot be disposed of at first sight: Whether there is any knowledge independent of all experience and even of all impressions of the senses? Such knowledge is called 'a priori' and is distinguished from empirical knowledge, which has its source 'a posteriori', that is, in experience...

By Anonym 14 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Standing armies shall in time be totally abolished.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Immanuel Kant

The arts of speech are rhetoric and poetry. Rhetoric is the art of transacting a serious business of the understanding as if it were a free play of the imagination; poetry that of conducting a free play of the imagination as if it were a serious business of the understanding.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Immanuel Kant

Physicians think they do a lot for a patient when they give his disease a name.