Best 295 of John Locke quotes - MyQuotes

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John Locke
By Anonym 14 Sep

John Locke

Knowledge being to be had only of visible and certain truth, error is not a fault of our knowledge, but a mistake of our judgment, giving assent to that which is not true.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Locke

Our incomes are like our shoes; if too small, they gall and pinch us; but if too large, they cause us to stumble and to trip.

By Anonym 18 Sep

John Locke

Sec. 10. Besides the crime which consists in violating the law, and varying from the right rule of reason, whereby a man so far becomes degenerate, and declares himself to quit the principles of human nature, and to be a noxious creature, there is commonly injury done to some person or other, and some other man receives damage by his transgression: in which case he who hath received any damage, has, besides the right of punishment common to him with other men, a particular right to seek reparation from him that has done it: and any other person, who finds it just, may also join with him that is injured, and assist him in recovering from the offender so much as may make satisfaction for the harm he has suffered.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Locke

The discipline of desire is the background of character.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Locke

Affectation is an awkward and forced imitation of what should be genuine and easy, wanting the beauty that accompanies what is natural.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Locke

Parents wonder why the streams are bitter, when they themselves have poisoned the fountain.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Locke

Error is none the better for being common, nor truth the worse for having lain neglected.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Locke

So that, in effect, religion, which should most distinguish us from beasts, and ought most peculiarly to elevate us, as rational creatures, above brutes, is that wherein men often appear most irrational, and more senseless than beasts themselves.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Locke

The first step to get this noble and manly steadiness, is... carefully keep children from frights of all kinds, when they are young. ...Instances of such who in a weak timorous mind, have borne, all their whole lives through, the effects of a fright when they were young, are every where to be seen, and therefore as much as may be to be prevented.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Locke

The Commonwealth of Learning is not at this time without Master-Builders, whose mighty Designs, in advancing the Sciences, will leave lasting Monuments to the Admiration of Posterity; But every one must not hope to be a Boyle, or a Sydenham; and in an Age that produces such Masters, as the Great-Huygenius, and the incomparable Mr. Newton, with some other of that Strain; 'tis Ambition enough to be employed as an Under-Labourer in clearing Ground a little, and removing some of the Rubbish, that lies in the way to Knowledge.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Locke

Logic is the anatomy of thought.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Locke

Fashion for the most part is nothing but the ostentation of riches.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

These two, I say, viz. external material things, as the objects of SENSATION, and the operations of our own minds within, as the objects of REFLECTION, are to me the only originals from whence all our ideas take their beginnings.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

When Fashion hath once Established, what Folly or craft began, Custom makes it Sacred, and 'twill be thought impudence or madness, to contradict or question it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Locke

Curiosity in children ... is but an appetite after knowledge and therefore ought to be encouraged in them, not only as a good sign, but as the great instrument nature has provided to remove that ignorance they were born with and which, without this busy inquisitiveness, will make them dull and useless creatures.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

Truth certainly would do well enough, if she were once left to shift for herself...She is not taught by laws, nor has she any need of force, to procure her entrance into the minds of men.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Locke

Revelation in matters where reason cannot judge, or but probably, ought to be hearkened to. First, Whatever proposition is revealed, of whose truth our mind, by its natural faculties and notions, cannot judge, that is purely matter of faith, and above reason.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

business of man is to be happy,

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

What if everything that happened here, happened for a reason?

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Locke

As much land as a man tills, plants, improves, cultivated, and can use the product of, so much is his property. He by his labour does, as it were, enclose it from the common.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

The Ideas of primary Qualities of Bodies, are Resemblances of them, and their Patterns do really exist in the Bodies themselves; but the Ideas, produced in us by these Secondary Qualities, have no resemblance of them at all. There is nothing like our Ideas, existing in the Bodies themselves. They are in Bodies, we denominate from them, only a Power to produce those Sensations in us: And what is Sweet, Blue or Warm in Idea, is but the certain Bulk, Figure, and Motion of the insensible parts in the Bodies themselves, which we call so.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

Till a man can judge whether they be truths or not, his understanding is but little improved, and thus men of much reading, though greatly learned, but may be little knowing.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

When I had gone through the whole, and saw what a plain, simple, reasonable thing Christianity was, suited to all conditions and capacities; and in the morality of it now, with divine authority, established into a legible law, so far surpassing all that philosophy and human reason had attained to, or could possibly make effectual to all degrees of man kind; I was flattered to think it might be of some use in the world.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Locke

[I]t being reasonable and just, I should have a right to destroy that which threatens me with destruction: for by the fundamental law of nature, man being to be preserved as much as possible, when all cannot be preserved, the safety of the innocent is to be preferred: and one may destroy a man who makes war upon him, or has discovered an enmity to his being, for the same reason that he may kill a Wolf or a lion.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

There is frequently more to be learned from the unexpected questions of a child than the discourses of men.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Locke

Liberty is to be free from restraint and violence from others

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Locke

But there is only one thing which gathers people into seditious commotion, and that is oppression

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Locke

Slavery is so vile and miserable an Estate of Man, and so directly opposite to the generous Temper and Courage of our Nation; that 'tis hardly to be conceived, that an Englishman, much less a Gentleman, should plead for't.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Locke

Children have as much mind to show that they are free, that their own good actions come from themselves, that they are absolute and independent, as any of the proudest of you grown men, think of them as you please.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

The native and untaught suggestions of inquisitive children do often offer things, that may set a considering man's thoughts on work. And I think there is frequently more to be learn'd from the unexpected questions of a child than the discourses of men, who talk in a road, according to the notions they have borrowed, and the prejudices of their education.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Locke

It is reported of that prodigy of parts, Monsieur Pascal, that till the decay of his health had impaired his memory, he forgot nothing of what he had done, read, or thought, in any part of his rational age. This is a privilege so little known to most men, that it seems almost incredible to those who, after the ordinary way, measure all others by themselves; but yet, when considered, may help us to enlarge our thoughts towards greater perfections of it, in superior ranks of spirits.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Locke

He that in the ordinary affairs of life would admit of nothing but direct plain demonstration would be sure of nothing in this world but of perishing quickly.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

When we know our own strength, we shall the better know what to undertake with hopes of success.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

Where there is no property there is no injustice.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

Whoever has used what means he is capable of, for the informing of himself, with a readiness to believe and obey what shall be taught and prescribed by Jesus, his Lord and King, is a true and faithful subject of Christ s kingdom:;; and cannot be thought to fail in any thing necessary to salvation.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

The only fence against the world is a thorough knowledge of it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Locke

Justice and truth are the common ties of society

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Locke

..every Man has a Property in his own Person. This no Body has any Right to but himself. The Labour of his Body, and the Work of his Hands, we may say, are properly his. .... The great and chief end therefore, of Mens uniting into Commonwealths, and putting themselves under Government, is the Preservation of their Property.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

The works of nature and the works of revelation display religion to mankind in characters so large and visible that those who are not quite blind may in them see and read the first principles and most necessary parts of it and from thence penet into those infinite depths filled with the treasures of wisdom and knowledge.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

There cannot be greater rudeness than to interrupt another in the current of his discourse.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Locke

From whence it is obvious to conclude that, since our Faculties are not fitted to penetrate into the internal Fabrick and real Essences of Bodies; but yet plainly discover to us the Being of a GOD, and the Knowledge of our selves, enough to lead us into a full and clear discovery of our Duty, and great Concernment, it will become us, as rational Creatures, to imploy those Faculties we have about what they are most adapted to, and follow the direction of Nature, where it seems to point us out the way.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Locke

The Church which taught men not to keep faith with heretics, had no claim to toleration.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Locke

If punishment reaches not the mind and makes not the will supple, it hardens the offender.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Locke

All the entertainment and talk of history is nothing almost but fighting and killing: and the honour and renown that is bestowed on conquerors (who for the most part are but the great butchers of mankind) farther mislead growing youth, who by this means come to think slaughter the laudable business of mankind, and the most heroic of virtues.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Locke

It is of great use to the sailor to know the length of his line, though he cannot with it fathom all the depths of the ocean.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Locke

False and doubtful positions, relied upon as unquestionable maxims, keep those who build on them in the dark from truth. Such are usually the prejudices imbibed from education, party, reverence, fashion, interest, et cetera.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Locke

It is ambition enough to be employed as an under-labourer in clearing the ground a little, and removing some of the rubbish that lies in the way to knowledge.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Locke

A man may live long, and die at last in ignorance of many truths, which his mind was capable of knowing, and that with certainty.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

There are two sides, two players. One is light, the other is dark.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Locke

Who hath a prospect of the different state of perfect happiness or misery that attends all men after this life, depending on their behavior, the measures of good and evil that govern his choice are mightily changed.