Best 27 of Mahabharata quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 19 Sep

Leena Saldanha

The real cost Of Kurukshetra Was the moment When you disappeared Over the horizon At the end of our universe That moment When you looked back And couldn't see me When I strained my eyes But couldn't see you The monumental Incalculable Cost Of war Was an empty horizon. It always has been, Krishna.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Aniket S Sharma

The strength of a warrior is not defined by the wars he wins; but the times he seeks for peace.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Johan Huizinga

For us the chief point of interest is the place where the game is played. Generatly it is a simple circle, dyutamandalam, drawn on the ground. The circle as such, however, has a magic significance. It is drawn with great care, all sorts of precautions being taken against cheating. The players are not allowed to leave the ring until they have discharged their obligations. But, sometimes a special hall is provisionally erected for the game, and this hall is holy ground. The Mahabharata devotes a whole chapter to the erection of the dicing hall - sabha - where the Pandavas are to meet their prtners. Games, of chance, therefore, have their serious side. They are included in ritual.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Shashi Tharoor

They say every dog has its day, Ganapathi, but for this terrier twilight came before tea-time.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Sudha Murty

Suddenly Yudhisthira saw a yaksha approaching him. The being sat in front of him and began firing questions rapidly at him. What is bigger than the Earth? the yaksha asked. "A mother" replied Yudhisthira. What is taller than the sky? "A father" What is faster than the wind? "The mind , of course". Yudhisthira smiled. What grows faster than hay? "Worry" What is the greatest dharma in the world? queried the yaksha "Compassion and conscience" With who is friendship never-ending? "With good people" responded Yudhisthira patiently. What is the secret to never feeling unhappy? "If one can control his or her mind, then that person will never feel sad" The yaksha increase his pace now. What is the greatest kind of wealth. "Education" What is the greatest kind of profit? "Health" What is the greatest kind of happiness? "Contentment" said Yudhisthira, ever prompt with his replies. What is man's worst enemy? "Anger" What disease will never have a cure? "Greed is incurable" The yaksha smiled again. A last question my friend. What is life's biggest irony? "It is the desire to live eternally. Every day, we encounter people dying but we always think that death will never come to us.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Sudha Murty

The day the Pandavas received the Akshaya Patra from the sun god is still celebrated in India as Akshaya Tritiya, which comes every year during the spring harvest in April or May. It is an extremely auspicious day and people believe that whatever they buy that day will grow in value. Most people prefer to purchase gold on this day

By Anonym 19 Sep

Vivek Narayan Sharma

There are many Arjunas in Kalyuga; they are focused, bright, hard-working, loving, righteous young men who want to change the world. Their patience and connectivity to Krishna tests the longevity of their characters; some of them give up and transform into Shakunis and Kauravas.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Shashi Tharoor

The Mahabharata declares, 'What is here is nowhere else; what is not here, is nowhere.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

No text, being human creation, is free from flaws – it is the human mind that should be conscientious enough to accept their good elements and discard the bad ones.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Devdutt Pattanaik

...many forces that influenced the flow of the tale: boons and curses and manmade laws. There was no hero or villain in the epic, just people struggling with life, responding to crises, making mistakes, repeating mistakes, in innocence or ignorance, while trying to make their lives meaningful and worthwhile.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Aniket S Sharma

The fear of losing can make a calm mind restless

By Anonym 20 Sep

Devdutt Pattanaik

Within the infinite myths lies the eternal truth

By Anonym 20 Sep

Stephen Prothero

Widespread criticisms of jihad in Islam and the so-called sword verses in the Quran have unearthed for fair-minded Christians difficult questions about Christianity's own traditions of holy war and 'texts of terror.' Like Hinduism's Mahabharata epic, the Bible devotes entire books to war and rumors thereof. Unlike the Quran, however, it contains hardly any rules for how to conduct a just war.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Krishna-dwaipayana Vyasa

Mahabharata - whatever is not contained in this is not to be found anywhere

By Anonym 18 Sep

Aniket S Sharma

The Beauty of Life is in the Struggles it Throws

By Anonym 20 Sep

Aniket S Sharma

You are always in the truth; And the truth is always in you.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Aniket S Sharma

We Gain, We Lose, We Aspire, We Become

By Anonym 16 Sep

Aditya Iyengar

It seems we would rather have a past filled with great scientists than just great artists and writers who could dream up these wonderful and awe-inspiring creations. It's a strange irony: we're spending our time trying to find the truth in our past, but creating myths of ourselves in the present.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Sudha Murty

It is this Bharata, an ancestor of the Pandavas and Kauravas, after who our country is named - Bharat. Our land is also known as Bharatvarsha, or the kingdom of Bharata.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Aniket S Sharma

History Depicts the Events Happened; the way we Perceive makes the difference

By Anonym 16 Sep

Aniket S Sharma

Future can be created; the truth can never be altered

By Anonym 18 Sep

Tarun J. Tejpal

The greatest book in the world, the Mahabharata, tells us we all have to live and die by our karmic cycle. Thus works the perfect reward-and-punishment, cause-and-effect, code of the universe. We live out in our present life what we wrote out in our last. But the great moral thriller also orders us to rage against karma and its despotic dictates. It teaches us to subvert it. To change it. It tells us we also write out our next lives as we live out our present. The Mahabharata is not a work of religious instruction. It is much greater. It is a work of art. It understands men will always fall in the shifting chasm between the tug of the moral and the lure of the immoral. It is in this shifting space of uncertitude that men become men. Not animals, not gods. It understands truth is relative. That it is defined by context and motive. It encourages the noblest of men - Yudhishtra, Arjuna, Lord Krishna himself - to lie, so that a greater truth may be served. It understands the world is powered by desire. And that desire is an unknowable thing. Desire conjures death, destruction, distress. But also creates love, beauty, art. It is our greatest undoing. And the only reason for all doing. And doing is life. Doing is karma. Thus it forgives even those who desire intemperately. It forgives Duryodhana. The man who desires without pause. The man who precipitates the war to end all wars. It grants him paradise and the admiration of the gods. In the desiring and the doing this most reviled of men fulfils the mandate of man. You must know the world before you are done with it. You must act on desire before you renounce it. There can be no merit in forgoing the not known. The greatest book in the world rescues volition from religion and gives it back to man. Religion is the disciplinarian fantasy of a schoolmaster. The Mahabharata is the joyous song of life of a maestro. In its tales within tales it takes religion for a spin and skins it inside out. Leaves it puzzling over its own poisoned follicles. It gives men the chance to be splendid. Doubt-ridden architects of some small part of their lives. Duryodhanas who can win even as they lose.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni

Were the stories we told each other true? Who knows? At the best of times, a story is a slippery thing. Perhaps that was why it changed with each telling. Or is that the nature of all stories, the reason for their power?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Johan Huizinga

For us the chief point of interest is the place where the game is played. Generally it is a simple circle, dyutamandalam, drawn on the ground. The circle as such, however, has a magic significance. It is drawn with great care, all sorts of precautions being taken against cheating. The players are not allowed to leave the ring until they have discharged their obligations. But, sometimes a special hall is provisionally erected for the game, and this hall is holy ground. The Mahabharata devotes a whole chapter to the erection of the dicing hall - sabha - where the Pandavas are to meet their prtners. Games, of chance, therefore, have their serious side. They are included in ritual.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Aniket S Sharma

The Beauty of Life is in the Struggle it Throws

By Anonym 16 Sep

K Hari Kumar

Do you know which is the greatest epic till date?

By Anonym 18 Sep

Aniket S Sharma

Opportunities if not created today will not knock tomorrow