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George Eliot
By Anonym 15 Sep

George Eliot

Those only can thoroughly feel the meaning of death who know what is perfect love.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Eliot

The greatest benefit we owe to the artist, whether painter, poet, or novelist, is the extension of our sympathies.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Eliot

The fact is, both callers and work thicken - the former sadly interfering with the latter.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Eliot

It is seldom that the miserable can help regarding their misery as a wrong inflicted by those who are less miserable.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Eliot

No compliment can be eloquent, except as an expression of indifference.

By Anonym 18 Sep

George Eliot

Rosamund, taken hold of by an emotion stronger than her own--hurried along in a new movement which gave all things some new, awful, undefined aspect--could find no words, but involuntarily she put her lips to Dorothea's forehead which was very near her, and then for a minute the two women clasped each other as if they had been in a shipwreck.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Eliot

In all failures, the beginning is certainly the half of the whole.

By Anonym 20 Sep

George Eliot

You want to find out a mode of renunciation that will be an escape from pain. I tell you again, there is no such escape possible except by perverting or mutilating one's nature. What would become of me, if I tried to escape pain? Scorn and cynicism would be my only opium; unless I could fall into some kind of conceited madness, and fancy myself a favourite of Heaven because I am not a favourite with men.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Eliot

What is better than to love and live with the loved? -- But that must sometimes bring us to live with the dead; and this too turns at last into a very tranquil and sweet tie, safe from change and injury.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Eliot

A picture of human life such as a great artist can give, surprises even the trivial and the selfish into that attention to what is apart from themselves, which may be called the raw material of moral sentiment.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Eliot

History repeats itself.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Eliot

A man never lies with more delicious languor under the influence of a passion than when he has persuaded himself that he shall subdue it to-morrow.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Eliot

Pity that consequences are determined not by excuses but by actions!

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Eliot

Breed is stronger than pasture.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Eliot

"Heaven help us," said the old religion; the new one, from its very lack of that faith, will teach us all the more to help one another.

By Anonym 18 Sep

George Eliot

On the contrary, having the amiable vanity which knits us to those who are fond of us, and disinclines us to those who are indifferent, and also a good grateful nature, the mere idea that a woman had a kindness towards him spun little threads of tenderness from out his heart towards hers.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Eliot

If we use common words on a great occasion, they are the more striking, because they are felt at once to have a particular meaning, like old banners, or everyday clothes, hung up in a sacred place.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Eliot

There are various orders of beauty, causing men to make fools of themselves in various styles.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Eliot

Genius is the capacity for receiving and improving by discipline.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Eliot

Minds fettered by this doctrine no longer inquire concerning a proposition whether it is attested by sufficient evidence, but whether it accords with Scripture; they do not search for facts as such, but for facts that will bear out their doctrine. It is easy to see that this mental habit blunts not only the perception of truth, but the sense of truthfulness, and that the man whose faith drives him into fallacies treads close upon the precipice of falsehood.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Eliot

Perhaps his might be one of the natures where a wise estimate of consequences is fused in the fires of that passionate belief which determines the consequences it believes in.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Eliot

There is no short-cut no patent tram-road, to wisdom. After all the centuries of invention, the soul's path lies through the thorny wilderness which must still be trodden in solitude, with bleeding feet, with sobs for help, as it was trodden by them of old time.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Eliot

It is, I fear, but a vain show of fulfilling the heathen precept, ''Know thyself,'' and too often leads to a self- estimate which will subsist in the absence of that fruit by which alone the quality of the tree is made evident.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Eliot

It's well known there's always two sides, if no more.

By Anonym 16 Sep

George Eliot

Doubtless some ancient Greek has observed that behind the big mask and the speaking-trumpet, there must always be our poor little eyes peeping as usual and our timorous lips more or less under anxious control.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Eliot

What furniture can give such finish to a room as a tender woman's face? And is there any harmony of tints that has such stirring of delight as the sweet modulation of her voice?

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Eliot

Women should be protected from anyone's exercise of unrighteous power... but then, so should every other living creature.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Eliot

News is often dispersed as thoughtlessly and effectively as that pollen which the bees carry off (having no idea how powdery they are) when they are buzzing in search of their particular nectar.

By Anonym 19 Sep

George Eliot

There is much pain that is quite noiseless; and vibrations that make human agonies are often a mere whisper in the roar of hurrying existence. There are glances of hatred that stab and raise no cry of murder; robberies that leave man or woman forever beggared of peace and joy, yet kept secret by the sufferer—committed to no sound except that of low moans in the night, seen in no writing except that made on the face by the slow months of suppressed anguish and early morning tears. Many an inherited sorrow that has marred a life has been breathed into no human ear.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Eliot

Great Love has many attributes, and shrines For varied worshippers, but his force divine Shows most its many-named fulness in the man Whose nature multitudinously mixed-- Each ardent impulse grappling with a thought-- Resists all easy gladness, all content Save mystic rapture, where the questioning soul Flooded with consciousness of good that is Finds life one bounteous answer.

By Anonym 18 Sep

George Eliot

The brethren sometimes err in measuring the Divine love by the sinner's knowledge.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Eliot

Dark the Night, with breath all flowers, And tender broken voice that fills With ravishment the listening hours,-- Whisperings, wooings, Liquid ripples, and soft ring-dove cooings In low-toned rhythm that love's aching stills! Dark the night Yet is she bright, For in her dark she brings the mystic star, Trembling yet strong, as is the voice of love, From some unknown afar.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Eliot

There's many a good bit o' work done with a sad heart.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Eliot

When gratitude has become a matter of reasoning there are many ways of escaping from its bonds.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Eliot

Surely there was something taught her by this experience of great need; and she must be learning a secret of human tenderness and long-suffering, that the less erring could hardly know?

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Eliot

We have all our secret sins; and if we knew ourselves we should not judge each other harshly.

By Anonym 20 Sep

George Eliot

Young love-making--that gossamer web! Even the points it clings to--the things whence its subtle interlacing are swung--are scarcely perceptible; momentary touches of finger-tips, meetings of rays from blue and dark orbs, unfinished phrases, lightest changes of cheek and lip, faintest tremors. The web itself is made of spontaneous beliefs and indefinable joys, yearnings of one life to another, visions of completeness, indefinite trust.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Eliot

You may try — but you can never imagine what it is to have a man's force of genius in you, and yet to suffer the slavery of being a girl.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Eliot

There are robberies that leave man or woman forever beggared of peace and joy, yet kept secret by the sufferer.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Eliot

But let the wise be warned against too great readiness to explanation: it multiplies the sources of mistake, lengthening the sum for reckoners sure to go wrong.

By Anonym 16 Sep

George Eliot

It spoils my enjoyment of anything when I am made to think that most people are shut from it. 'I call that fanaticism of sympathy,' said Will, impetuously. If you carried it out you ought to be miserable in your own goodness, and then turn evil that you might have no advantage over others. The best piety is to enjoy - when you can. You are doing the most to save the earths character as an agreeable planet. And enjoyment radiates. It is of no use to try and take care of all the world; that is being taken care of when you feel delight - in art or in anything else. Would you turn all the youth of the world into a tragic chorus, wailing and moralizing over misery? I suspect that you have a false belief in the virtues of misery, and want to make your life a martyrdom.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Eliot

A woman's hopes are woven of sunbeams; a shadow annihilates them.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Eliot

Ingenious philosophers tell you, perhaps, that the great work of the steam-engine is to create leisure for mankind. Do not believe them; it only creates a vacuum for eager thought to rush in.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Eliot

The last refuge of intolerance is in not tolerating the intolerant.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Eliot

The first sense of mutual love excludes other feelings; it will have the soul all to itself.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Eliot

So deeply inherent is it in this life of ours that men have to suffer for each other's sins, so inevitably diffusive is human suffering, that even justice makes its victims, and we can conceive no retribution that does not spread beyond its mark in pulsations of unmerited pain.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Eliot

Much of our waking experience is but a dream in the daylight.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Eliot

There is no feeling, perhaps, except the extremes of fear and grief, that does not find relief in music,--that does not make a man sing or play the better.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Eliot

Quick souls have their intensest life in the first anticipatory sketch of what may or will be, and the pursuit of their wish is the pursuit of that paradisiacal vision which only impelled them, and is left farther and farther behind, vanishing forever even out of hope in the moment which is called success.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Eliot

It is never too late to be who you want to be.