Best 75 of Dementia quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 17 Sep

Peggi Speers

Never give up hope. If you do, you'll be dead already.--Dementia Patient, Rose from The Inspired Caregiver

By Anonym 18 Sep

Barry Lyga

Psychologist: "This, ah, is a new sort of, ah, psychopathology that we're only now beginning to, ah, understand. These, ah, super-serial killers have no, ah, 'type' but, ah, rather consider everyone to be their 'type.'" Gramma: "Did you hear that? Your daddy's a superhero!

By Anonym 14 Sep

Simon Callow

Shakespeare wrote all there is that we need to know about dementia in 'King Lear.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Suzka

Violet believed that Jewish people made good doctors and lawyers, a thought that came to the front of her head suggesting she might need one.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Tara Reed

While no one can change the outcome of dementia or Alzheimer's, with the right support you can change the journey.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Suzka

She looked like some damn fool angel that didn't even know the name of God.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Lisa Genova

Her ability to use language, that thing that most separates humans from animals, was leaving her, and she was feeling less and less human as it departed. She's said a tearful good-bye to okay some time ago.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Amy Tan

Dementia. Ruth puzzled over the diagnosis: How could such a beautiful-sounding word apply to such a destructive disease? It was a name befitting a goddess: Dementia, who caused her sister Demeter to forget to turn winter into spring.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Louise Penny

She’d forgotten to love, but she also forgot to hate. (about Clara’s mother, who had dementia)

By Anonym 16 Sep

Suzka

Her eyes were trained to see the missing parts of the world.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Andrea Lochen

What made Olive the saddest about the Gardners was that everyone wanted to be enshrined in someone’s memory. It was the only way of living on after death, really: in the minds of loved ones. Memories were the only things that made aging bearable, a way of reverting to better, simpler days.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Bob Demarco

When you objectify a person living with dementia, you dehumanize them. Once dehumanized, the person becomes a villain.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Michael Zadoorian

Hi lover," he says to me, completely forgetting what happened before. He knows who I am. He knows that I am the one person who he loves, has always loved. No disease, no person can take that away. (p.205)

By Anonym 13 Sep

Don Ihde

I can't experience my brain because I'm inside of it. If you're imaging your brain, you can also find scary things. As one ages, your brain shrinks. And how much it shrinks, and where it shrinks, relates to conditions like Alzheimer's and dementia.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jordan Banks

There will be many cases when researchers will need to look at data to come closer to a cure, in maybe five years, 10 years, 15 years. We can help make that data analysis easier. We can't let this wait. Dementia has potential to cripple our economy.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Vladimir Nabokov

Maud Shade was eighty when a sudden hush Fell on her life. We saw the angry flush And torsion of paralysis assail Her noble cheek. We moved her to Pinedale, Famed for its sanitarium. There she'd sit In the glassed sun and watch the fly that lit Upon her dress and then upon her wrist. Her mind kept fading in the growing mist. She still could speak. She paused, and groped, and found What seemed at first a serviceable sound, But from adjacent cells impostors took The place of words she needed, and her look Spelt imploration as she fought in vain To reason with the monsters in her brain.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Peggi Speers

I believe that most caregivers find that they inherit a situation where they just kind of move into caregiving. It's not a conscious decision for most caregivers, and they are ultimately left with the responsibility of working while still trying to be the caregiver, the provider, and the nurturer.- Sharon Law Tucker

By Anonym 15 Sep

Nancy L. Kriseman

Caregiving will never be one-size-fits-all.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Linda De Quincey

Shut your mouth - there's a bus coming.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Suzka

Violet screamed into her pillow so loudly she scared herself. Her head hurt. It was as if all her memories were trying to kick their way out. They were finished and wanted to leave.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Shaun David Hutchinson

Age isn't stealing from my grandmother; it's slowly unwinding her.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Barry Lyga

He easily gathered her in his arms; Gramma was made up of skin and bones and hate and crazy - and hate and crazy don't weigh anything.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Suzka

The lady roommate said very little and chopped off the better parts of her story.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Anne Carson

So about an hour later we are in the taxi shooting along empty country roads towards town. The April light is clear as an alarm. As we pass them it gives a sudden sense of every object existing in space on its own shadow. I wish I could carry this clarity with me into the hospital where distinctions tend to flatten and coalesce. I wish I had been nicer to him before he got crazy. These are my two wishes.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Emma Donoghue

My mother was wonderfully out about her dementia. She would sort of - she would say to me, I came out to the window cleaner about having dementia. You know, I love the way that verb for coming out of the closet has now become so socially useful for all sorts of situations, like when you need to explain to the window cleaner that you don't know if you paid him or not.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Jonathan Miles

…wondering, not for the first time, if there was a kind of dark bliss built into dementia: an immunity from death and abandonment, a way of fixing a point in time so that nothing can change, nothing can be rewritten, no one can leave.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Darrell Drake

There is a duality to darkness known only to those who’ve been infected by its touch. Everyone knows the shadows: shallow, comfortable, mostly harmless places where one might nest for a night. But the depths of living pitch only visit the aristocracy of madmen and women who’ve unwittingly pledged fealty to the curse. For some, it outright ruins minds like a hound to fresh meat; for others, it wanes into the deepest parts of its less caustic sibling and waits for the time to strike, returning periodically through life like an incurable disease.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lisa Genova

And while a bald head and a looped ribbon were seen as badges of courage and hope, her reluctant vocabulary and vanishing memories advertised mental instability and impending insanity. Those with cancer could expect to be supported by their community. Alice expected to be an outcast.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Rowan Coleman

looking at my reflection, in the window opposite, hollow and translucent, I see a woman disappearing. It would help if I looked like that in real life – if the more the disease advanced, the more ‘see-through’ I became until, eventually, I would be just a wisp of a ghost. How much more convenient it would be, how much easier for everyone, including me, if my body just melted away along with my mind. Then we’d all know where we were, literally and metaphysically.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Suzka

There is magic just outside our memory.

By Anonym 17 Sep

John Daniel

[Memory]... is a system of near-infinite complexity, a system that seems designed for revision as much as for replication, and revision unquestionably occurs. Details from separate experiences weave together, so that the rememberer thinks of them as having happened together. The actual year or season or time of day shifts to a different one. Many details are lost, usually in ways that serve the self in its present situation, not the self of ten or twenty or forty years ago when the remembered event took place. And even the fresh memory, the 'original,' is not reliable in a documentary sense....Memory, in short, is not a record of the past but an evolving myth of understanding the psyche spins from its engagement with the world.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Suzka

My mother made that dress. She’s somewhere in its unsettling pattern.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Peggi Speers

Many of us follow the commandment 'Love One Another.' When it relates to caregiving, we must love one another with boundaries. We must acknowledge that we are included in the 'Love One Another.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Peggi Speers

I love you but I got to love me more.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Suzka

Her memories got dizzy and fell out of her head.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dorothy Hampton Marcus

I don't know which hurt more: his rejection, his punch, or my own elder siblings laughing at my pain.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Suzka

There were thousands of secrets hidden in her purse, secrets and memories that took her elsewhere. She held onto them tightly and kept them to herself. Even God did not know of them.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Suzka

Violet unwrapped everything old as if it were a ribboned gift given to her by the Gods.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walter Mosley

My experience of people in dementia is that a lot of their personality, a lot of their knowledge, a lot of their experience is still there but there's not a direction connection that they can just reach out and get it and then bring it back.

By Anonym 18 Sep

S. K. Kalsi

The evening's light, silvery, casts its dull brightness onto the trees--trees gelid in this blue light of winter. But whiteness dominates with the pines and evergreens steeped in vibrant grades of silver. I hear notes in the mist, like silvery chattering, coins in a pocket, the jangle of keys. Pg 217

By Anonym 18 Sep

Lisa Genova

She almost thought she'd said the words aloud, but she hadn't. They remained trapped in her head, but not because they were barricaded by plaques and tangles. She just couldn't say them aloud

By Anonym 19 Sep

Janet Turpin Myers

Was the dementia of old age a blessing in disguise? No more thoughts. No more damage inflicted. No more memories of damage survived.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Nancy L. Kriseman

My caregiver mantra is to remember 'The only control you have is over the changes you choose to make.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Suzka

Violet wasn't sure what she was saying. Words fell out of her mouth with no mind and no malice.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Suzka

I saw my mother with eyes opened and not curtained by her motherhood or my ego.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Suzka

The idea of disassociating from one’s surrounding, of taking a step back was rather clever on my mother’s part without her notice.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Suzka

In Dementialand I was able to see for miles without the yesterdays and tomorrows obstructing my view. It was difficult and so simple all at the same time.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Suzka

Violet kept her visits private and never told me where she went. I really never asked. I believed the dementias gave her special powers.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Joyce Rachelle

Dementia: Is it more painful to forget, or to be forgotten?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susan Straley

A PET scan of his brain activity showed diminished capacity on the left side of his brain, hence, planning ahead, strategic thinking is harmed. A positive is that he is less critical of things. He has lost language and gained singing... THAT makes for more fun. What amazes me is that so many times he returns and talks and seems to think like he used to. His voice and laugh returns to normal. How can that be???