Best 47 of Henryk Sienkiewicz quotes - MyQuotes

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Henryk Sienkiewicz
By Anonym 13 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

If the infinity of the sea may call out thus, perhaps when a man is growing old, calls come to him, too, from another infinity still darker and more deeply mysterious; and the more he is wearied by life the dearer are those calls to him.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

At most, a hundred paces separated him from them. The powerful beast, seeing the riders and horses, rose on his fore paws and began to gaze at them. The sun, which now stood low, illuminated his huge head and shaggy breasts, and in that ruddy luster he was like one of those sphinxes which ornament the entrances to ancient Egyptian temples.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

Amid the stillness of the night, in the depths of the ravine, from the direction in which the corpses lay suddenly resounded a kind of inhuman, frightful laughter in which quivered despair, and joy, and cruelty, and suffering, and pain, and sobbing, and derision; the heart-rending and spasmodic laughter of the insane or condemned.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

In the meantime the groans changed into the protracted, thunderous roar by which all living creatures are struck with terror, and the nerves of people, who do not know what fear is, shake, just as the window-panes rattle from distant cannonading.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

The profession of the writer has its thorns about which the reader does not dream.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

Am auzit sau am citit că filoanele de aur au uneori la suprafață un înveliș de cuarț, din care e greu să extragi metalul. Presupun că și inima ta are un asemenea înveliș; înăuntru se află metalul prețios, dar afurisita asta de coajă nu s-a topit de tot...

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

But the French writers always had more originality and independence than others, and that regulator, which elsewhere was religion, long since ceased to exist for them.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

Numai moartea e o forță la fel de absolută, dar în lupta de veacuri dintre aceste două puteri, dragostea este cea care ia moartea de gât, îi pune genunchiul în piept, o bate ziua și noaptea, o învinge în fiecare primăvară, o urmărește pas cu pas și-n fiecare groapă pe care aceasta o sapă, dragostea aruncă sămânța unei vieți noi.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

I go to church because I am a skeptic in regard to my own skepticism.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

The sky is one whole, the water another; and between those two infinities the soul of man is in loneliness.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

She wasted and grew so thin that she no longer was a little girl, but the shadow of a little girl. The flame of her life flickered so faintly that it appeared sufficient to blow at it to extinguish it. Stas understood that death did not have to wait for a third attack to take her and he expected it any day or any hour.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

Așa-i de când lumea, că cine se introspectează prea mult, acela nu mai e de acord nici cu sine însuși, în cele din urmă, iar cine nu-i de acord cu sine însuși, acela nu-i capabil să ia o hotărâre.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

What dreadful misfortune awaited them among the savage hordes intoxicated with blood?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

He always smiles, even when contemplating nothing good.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

Every novelist should write something for children at least once in his lifetime.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

They were like two poor little leaves in a storm which bore death and annihilation not only to the heads of individuals, but to whole towns and entire tribes. What hand could snatch it and save two small, defenseless children?

By Anonym 19 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

There, about a dozen times during the day, the wind drives over the sky the swollen clouds, which water the earth copiously, after which the sun shines brightly, as if freshly bathed, and floods with a golden luster the rocks, the river, the trees, and the entire jungle.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

I consider that in dialectics I am the equal of Socrates. As to women, I agree that each has three or four souls, but none of them a reasoning one.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

I know from experience that to one who thinks much and feels deeply, it often seems that he has only to put down his thoughts and feelings in order to produce something altogether out of the common; yet as soon as he sets to work he falls into a certain mannerism of style and common phraseology; his thoughts do not come spontaneously, and one might almost say that it is not the mind that directs the pen, but the pen leads the mind into common, empty artificiality.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

He would not now conduct little Nell to the coast; he would not convey her by a steamer to Port Said, would not surrender her to Mr. Rawlinson; he himself would not fall into his father's arms and would not hear from his lips that he had acted like a true Pole! The end, the end! In a few days the sun would shine only upon the lifeless bodies and afterwards would dry them up into a semblance of those mummies which slumber in an eternal sleep in the museums in Egypt

By Anonym 17 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

More than once have I thought, Why does crime, even when as powerful as Cæsar, and assured of being beyond punishment, strive always for the appearances of truth, justice, and virtue? Why does it take the trouble? I consider that to murder a brother, a mother, a wife, is a thing worthy of some petty Asiatic king, not a Roman Cæsar; but if that position were mine, I should not write justifying letters to the Senate. But Nero writes. Nero is looking for appearances, for Nero is a coward. But Tiberius was not a coward; still he justified every step he took. Why is this? What a marvellous, involuntary homage paid to virtue by evil! And knowest thou what strikes me? This, that it is done because transgression is ugly and virtue is beautiful. Therefore a man of genuine æsthetic feeling is also a virtuous man. Hence I am virtuous.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

Wealth is not a hindrance, but rather a help towards attaining a proper standing in a chosen field of activity. I confess that as far as I am concerned, it has done me some service as it preserved my character from many a crookedness poverty might have exposed it to.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

In the presence of the storm, thunderbolts, hurricane, rain, darkness, and the lions, which might be concealed but a few paces away, he felt disarmed and helpless.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

Day is like day as two beads in a rosary, unless changes of weather form the only variety.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

I know that even the meanest person has still at his disposition high-sounding words wherewith to mask his real character.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

On an exhausted field, only weeds grow.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

My position is such that there is no necessity for me to enter into competition with struggling humanity. As to expensive and ruinous pleasures, I am a sceptic who knows how much they are worth, or rather, knows that they are not worth anything.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

The shots had dispersed the birds; there remained only two marabous, standing between ten and twenty paces away and plunged in reverie. They were like two old men with bald heads pressed between the shoulders.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

A man who leaves memoirs, whether well or badly written, provided they be sincere, renders a service to future psychologists and writers, giving them not only a faithful picture, but likewise human documents that may be relied upon.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

Life deserves laughter, hence people laugh at it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

Anxiety prepares the organism badly for an ordeal which even under more favorable circumstances would not be an easy thing to bear.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

Tell me,' asked Stas, 'what is a wicked deed?' 'If anyone takes away Kali's cow,' he answered after a brief reflection, 'that then is a wicked deed.' 'Excellent!' exclaimed Stas, 'and what is a good one?' This time the answer came without any reflection: 'If Kali takes away the cow of somebody else, that is a good deed.' Stas was too young to perceive that similar views of evil and good deeds were enunciated in Europe not only by politicians but by whole nations.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

If we repay evil with good, then how do we repay the good?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

There is within us a moral instinct which forbids us to rejoice at the death of even an enemy.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

An excessive preponderance of an idealistic mood is harmful to society: it creates daydreaming, political Don Quixotism, hope for heavenly intervention. This is an undeniable truth--but it is also true that every extreme is harmful.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

...he began to fear whether in the presence of far greater events, all his acts would not fade into insignificance, just as a drop of rain disappears into the sea.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

It is an altogether wrong idea that the modern product of civilization is less susceptible to love. I sometimes think it is the other way.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

Nevertheless, in this sea of human wretchedness and malice there bloomed at times compassion, as a pale flower blooms in a putrid marsh.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

This homage has been rendered not to me - for the Polish soil is fertile and does not lack better writers than me - but to the Polish achievement, the Polish genius.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

The fact is that between the classes there is a vast gulf that precludes all mutual understanding, and makes simultaneous efforts simply impossible.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

They did not, however, infect the air as the Sudanese sun dried them up like mummies; all had the hue of gray parchment, and were so much alike that the bodies of the Europeans, Egyptians, and negroes could not be distinguished from each other.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

The sky is one whole, the water another

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henryk Sienkiewicz

Evidently the merit depends on the result of the work.