Best 368 of Simone Weil quotes - MyQuotes

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Simone Weil
By Anonym 13 Sep

Simone Weil

If someone does me injury I must desire that this injury shall not degrade me. I must desire this out of love for him who inflicts it, in order that he may not really have done evil.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Simone Weil

In a general way, the literature of the twentieth century is essentially psychological; and psychology consists of describing states of the soul by displaying them all on the same plane, without any discrimination of value, as though good and evil were external to them, as though the effort toward the good could be absent at any moment from the thought of any man.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Simone Weil

The whole evolution of present-day society tends to develop the various forms of bureaucratic oppression and to give them a sort of autonomy in regard to capitalism as such.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Simone Weil

A Pharisee is someone who is virtuous out of obedience to the Great Beast.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Simone Weil

In this world we live in a mixture of time and eternity. Hell would be pure time.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Simone Weil

To love purely is to consent to distance, it is to adore the distance between ourselves and that which we love.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Simone Weil

War, which perpetuates itself under the form of preparation for war, has once and for all given the State an important role in production.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Simone Weil

With no matter what human being, taken individually, I always find reasons for concluding that sorrow and misfortune do not suit him; either because he seems too mediocre for anything so great, or, on the contrary, too precious to be destroyed.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Simone Weil

Capitalism has brought about the emancipation of collective humanity with respect to nature. But this collective humanity has itself taken on with respect to the individual the oppressive function formerly exercised by nature.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Simone Weil

Evil being the root of mystery, pain is the root of knowledge.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Simone Weil

Our patriotism comes straight from the Romans. This is why French children are encouraged to seek inspiration for it in Corneille. It is a pagan virtue, if these two words are compatible. The word pagan, when applied to Rome, early possesses the significance charged with horror which the early Christian controversialists gave it. The Romans really were an atheistic and idolatrous people; not idolatrous with regard to images made of stone or bronze, but idolatrous with regard to themselves. It is this idolatry of self which they have bequeathed to us in the form of patriotism.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Simone Weil

We cannot take a step toward the heavens. God crosses the universe and comes to us.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Simone Weil

A beautiful woman looking at her image in the mirror may very well believe the image is herself. An ugly woman knows it is not.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Simone Weil

It is not enough that France should be regarded as a country which enjoys the remains of a freedom acquired long ago. If she is still to count in the world--and if she does not intend to, she may as well perish--she must be seen by her own citizens and by all men as an ever-flowing source of liberty. There must not be a single genuine lover of freedom in the whole world who can have a valid reason for hating France.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Simone Weil

The contemporary form of true greatness lies in a civilization founded upon the spirituality of work.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Simone Weil

There is something in our soul that loathes true attention much more violently than flesh loathes fatigue. That something is much closer to evil than flesh is. That is why, every time we truly give our attention, we destroy some evil in ourselves. If one pays attention with this intention, fifteen minutes of attention is worth a lot of good works.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Simone Weil

We have to try to cure our faults by attention and not by will.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Simone Weil

We do injury to a child if we bring it up in a narrow Christianity, which prevents it from ever becoming capable of perceiving that there are treasures of purest gold to be found in non-Christian civilizations. Laical education does an even greater injury to children. It covers up those treasures, and those of Christianity as well.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Simone Weil

The real stumbling-block of totalitarian regimes is not the spiritual need of men for freedom of thought; it is men's inability to stand the physical and nervous strain of a permanent state of excitement, except during a few years of their youth.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Simone Weil

The villagers seldom leave the village; many scientists have limited and poorly cultivated minds apart from their specialty.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Simone Weil

The poet produces the beautiful by fixing his attention on something real.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Simone Weil

Compassion directed to oneself is humility.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Simone Weil

Love needs reality. What is more terrible than the discovery that through a bodily appearance we have been loving an imaginary being. It is much more terrible than death, from death does not prevent the Beloved from having lived. That is the punishment for having fed love on imagination.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Simone Weil

Nothing is worse than extreme affliction which destroys the "I" from the outside, because after that we can no longer destroy it ourselves.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Simone Weil

The development of the faculty of attention forms the real object and almost the sole interest of studies.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Simone Weil

If the middle classes haven’t the same need of an apocalypse, it is because long rows of figures have a poetry, a prestige which tempers in some sort the boredom associated with money; whereas, when money is counted in sixpences, we have boredom in its pure, unadulterated state. Nevertheless, that taste shown by bourgeois, both great and small, for Fascism, indicates that, in spite of everything, they too can feel bored.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Simone Weil

The great error of nearly all studies of war, an error into which all socialists have fallen, has been to consider war as an episode in foreign politics when it is especially an act of internal politics and the most atrocious act of all . . . Since the directing apparatus has no other way of fighting the enemy than by sending its own soldiers, under compulsion, to their death-the war of one state against another state resolves itself into a war of the state and the military apparatus against its own people.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Simone Weil

Purity is the power to contemplate defilement.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Simone Weil

We have invented the distinction between justice and charity. It is easy to understand why. Our notion of justice dispenses him who possesses from the obligation of giving. If he gives all the same, he thinks he has a right to be pleased with himself.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Simone Weil

A doctrine serves no purpose in itself, but it is indispensable to have one if only to avoid being deceived by false doctrines.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Simone Weil

Those who are unhappy have no need for anything in this world but people capable of giving them their attention.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Simone Weil

Man requires, not rice or potatoes, but food; not wood or coal, but heating. In the same way, for the needs of the soul, we must recognize the different, but equivalent, sorts of satisfaction which cater for the same requirements.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Simone Weil

Every atheist is an idolater- unless he is worshipping the true God in his impersonal aspect. The majority of the pious are idolaters.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Simone Weil

To write the lives of the great in separating them from their works necessarily ends by above all stressing their pettiness, because it is in their work that they have put the best of themselves.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Simone Weil

Someone who does not see a pane of glass is not aware of not seeing it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Simone Weil

We are only geometricians of matter; the Greeks were, first of all, geometricians in the apprenticeship to virtue.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Simone Weil

In general the relative value of the various religions is a very difficult thing to discern; it is almost impossible, perhaps quite impossible. For a religion is known only from inside.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Simone Weil

The human soul has need of security and also of risk. The fear of violence or of hunger or of any other extreme evil is a sickness of the soul. The boredom produced by a complete absence of risk is also a sickness of the soul.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Simone Weil

To want friendship is a great fault. Friendship ought to be a gratuitous joy, like the joys afforded by art or life.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Simone Weil

The need of truth is more sacred than any other need.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Simone Weil

Whoever is uprooted himself uproots others. Whoever is rooted himself doesn't uproot others.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Simone Weil

On reaching a certain degree of pain we lose the world.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Simone Weil

If Germany, thanks to Hitler and his successors, were to enslave the European nations and destroy most of the treasures of their past, future historians would certainly pronounce that she had civilized Europe.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Simone Weil

The poison of skepticism becomes, like alcoholism, tuberculosis, and some other diseases, much more virulent in a hitherto virgin soil.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Simone Weil

Even if our efforts of attention seem for years to be producing no result, one day a light that is in exact proportion to them will flood the soul.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Simone Weil

Sin is not a distance, it is a turning of our gaze in the wrong direction.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Simone Weil

Only he who has measured the dominion of force, and knows how not to respect it, is capable of love andjustice.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Simone Weil

Justice consists in seeing that no harm is done to men. Whenever a man cries inwardly: 'Why am I being hurt?' harm is being done to him. He is often mistaken when he tries to define the harm, and why and by whom it is being inflicted on him. But the cry itself is infallible.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Simone Weil

If three steps are taken without any other motive than the desire to obey God, those three steps are miraculous; they are equally so whether they take place on dry land or on water.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Simone Weil

Life does not need to mutilate itself in order to be pure.