Best 387 quotes in «manners quotes» category

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    The greater man the greater courtesy.

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    The great thing about being always among people of noble manners was the inevitable elevation of one's own.

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    The Japanese have perfected good manners and made them indistinguishable from rudeness.

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    The manners of women are the surest criterion by which to determine whether a republican government is practicable in a nation or not.

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    The mind must not be forced; artificial and constrained manners fill it with foolish presumption, through unnatural elevation and vain and ridiculous inflation, instead of solid and vigorous nutriment.

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    There is no excuse for bad manners, except fast reflexes.

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    The most part of all princes have more delight in warlike manners and feats of chivalry than in the good feats of peace.

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    There is certainly something of exquisite kindness and thoughtful benevolence in that rarest of gifts,--fine breeding.

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    There is a nobility in the world of manners.

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    There is no nobility with bad manners.

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    The ruin of a State is generally preceded by an universal degeneracy of manners and contempt of religion.

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    The society of women is the element of good manners.

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    The seasons change their manners, as the year Had found some months asleep and leapt them over.

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    The sign of a person who has had an education is good manners.

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    The talent of a meat packer, the morals of a money changer, and the manners of an undertaker.

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    To Americans, English manners are far more frightening than none at all.

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    The wolf changes his coat, but not his disposition.

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    To be always thinking about your manners is not the way to make them good; the very perfection of manners is not to think about yourself.

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    To be good and disagreeable is high treason against the royalty of virtue.

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    To be audacious with tact, you have to know to what point you can go too far.

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    To be thoroughly imbued, with the liberal arts refines the manners, and makes men to be mild and gentle in their conduct.

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    To offend is my pleasure; I love to be hated.

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    To have properly studied the liberal sciences gives a polish to our manners, and removes all awkwardness.

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    To make a pleasant and friendly impression is not alone good manners, but equally good business.

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    To use bad taste, you have to know the rules of good taste. I've always thanked my mother for that. She taught how to eat with proper table manners and all that stuff, to the point of rebellion. But I couldn't have rebelled from it if I didn't know it.

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    To rest, the cushion and soft dean invite, who never mentions hell to ears polite.

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    Unbecoming forwardness oftener proceeds from ignorance than impudence.

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    Wearing the correct dress for any occasion is a matter of good manners.

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    Unfortunately, manipulation and defamation are part of the bad manners that have been prevailing in Poland's politics for ten years now.

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    Vampire politics make the very complicated dance of manners that is werewolf protocol look like the Hokey Pokey.

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    Vulgarity of manners defiles fine garments more than mud.

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    We who have been born and nurtured on this soil, we, whose habits, manners, and customs are the same in common with other Americans, can never consent to - be the bearers of the redress offered by that Society to that much afflicted.

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    We cough because we can't help it, but others do it on purpose.

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    Well, I'm from the South originally. I grew up in South Carolina definitely learning about manners and being proper and having to go to cotillions.

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    Whoever one is, and wherever one is, one is always in the wrong if one is rude.

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    When one wants to change manners and customs, one should not do so by changing the laws.

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    When there's friction in the house, the only answer is good manners.

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    All the important roles shortly boiled down to one: remember your with other people; show some consideration.

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    Wouldn't it be a helluva joke if all this were really burnt cork and you people were being tolerant for nuthin'?

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    [Yankees] are pretty much like southerners except with worse manners, of course, and terrible accents.

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    Your manners will depend very much upon the quality of what you frequently think on; for the soul is as it were tinged with the colour and complexion of thought.

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    A chief cause of worry and unhappiness in life is trading what we want most for what we want at the moment.

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    A gentleman holds my hand. A man pulls my hair. A soulmate will do both.

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    Words can be worrisome, poeple complex, motives and manners unclear, grant her the wisdom to choose her path right, free from unkindness and fear.

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    You learn, just as you learn good manners, how to approach things with a certain amount of diplomacy.

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    You lose your manners when you're poor.

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    Always be one and not more than that!

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    Always refer to those of the female gender as ladies. The descriptive woman is usually reserved in Dixie for females of questionable respect.

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    Among the people to whom he belonged, nothing was written or talked about at that time except the Serbian war. Everything that the idle crowd usually does to kill time, it now did for the benefit of the Slavs: balls, concerts, dinners, speeches, ladies' dresses, beer, restaurants—all bore witness to our sympathy with the Slavs. With much that was spoken and written on the subject Konyshev did not agree in detail. He saw that the Slav question had become one of those fashionable diversions which, ever succeeding one another, serve to occupy Society; he saw that too many people took up the question from interested motives. He admitted that the papers published much that was unnecessary and exaggerated with the sole aim of drawing attention to themselves, each outcrying the other. He saw that amid this general elation in Society those who were unsuccessful or discontented leapt to the front and shouted louder than anyone else: Commanders-in-Chief without armies, Ministers without portfolios, journalists without papers, and party leaders without followers. He saw that there was much that was frivolous and ridiculous; but he also saw and admitted the unquestionable and ever-growing enthusiasm which was uniting all classes of society, and with which one could not help sympathizing. The massacre of our coreligionists and brother Slavs evoked sympathy for the sufferers and indignation against their oppressors. And the heroism of the Serbs and Montenegrins, fighting for a great cause, aroused in the whole nation a desire to help their brothers not only with words but by deeds. Also there was an accompanying fact that pleased Koznyshev. It was the manifestation of public opinion. The nation had definitely expressed its wishes. As Koznyshev put it, ' the soul of the nation had become articulate.' The more he went into this question, the clearer it seemed to him that it was a matter which would attain enormous proportions and become epoch-making.

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    As a girl, it had been firmly set down that one ought never speak until one was spoken to, and when one did, one ought not speak of anything that might provoke or worry. One referred to the limb of the table, not the leg, the white meat on the chicken, not the breast. Good manners were the foundations of civilization. One knew precisely with whom one sat in a room based entirely on how well they behaved, and in what manner. Forks and knives were placed at the ten-twenty on one's plate when one was finished eating, One ought to walk straight and keep one's hands to oneself when one s poke, least one be taken for an Italian or Jew. A woman was meant to tend a child, a garden, or a conversation. A woman ought to know how to mind the temperature in a room, adding a little heat in a well-timed question, or cool a warm temper with the suggestion of another drink, a bowl of nuts, and a smile. What Kitty had learned at Miss Porter's School---handed down from Sarah Porter through the spinsters teaching there, themselves the sisters of Yale men who handed down the great words, Truth. Verity. Honor--was that your brothers and your husbands and your sons will lead, and you will tend., You will watch and suggest, guide and protect. You will carry the torch forward, and all to the good. There was the world. And one fixed an eye keenly on it. One learned its history; one understood the causes of its wars. One debated and, gradually, a picture emerged of mankind over the centuries; on understood the difference between what was good and what was right. On understood that men could be led to evil, against the judgment of their better selves. Debauchery. Poverty of spirit. This was the explanation for so many unfortunate ills--slavery, for instance. The was the reason. Men, individual men, were not at fault. They had to be taught. Led. Shown by example what was best. Unfairness, unkindness could be addressed. Queitly. Patiently.. Without a lot of noisy attention. Noise was for the poorly bred. If one worried, if one were afraid, if one doubted--one kept it to oneself. One looked for the good, and one found it. The woman found it, the woman pointed it out, and the man tucked it in his pocket, heartened. These were the rules.